The 1984 24 Hours of Daytona Winner

1983 March-Porsche 83G GTP

Offered by Gooding & Company | Amelia Island, Florida | March 7, 2014

Photo - Gooding & Company

Photo – Gooding & Company

March Engineering was founded in 1969. The name March comes from the names of its founders: Max Mosley, Alan Rees, Graham Coaker, and Robin Herd. They were an F1 team until they built an Indy Car in 1981. In 1983 they entered the arena of Group C prototype racing cars and the 83G you see here was part of that effort.

The car was designed by the now-very-famous Adrian Newey and it is powered by a 3.0-liter turbocharged flat-six making between 650 and 800 horsepower depending on configuration. In any case, it is fast. This car competed in the U.S. IMSA GTP championship. And, in 1983, it won it. The competition of this car includes:

  • 1983 Charlotte 500km – 1st (with Al Holbert and Jim Trueman)
  • 1983 Lime Rock IMSA GTP – 9th (with Holbert)
  • 1983 Brainerd IMSA GTP – 1st (with Holbert and Trueman)
  • 1983 Sears Point 3 Hours – 1st (with Holbert and Trueman)
  • 1983 Portland 3 Hours – 1st (with Holbert)
  • 1983 Mosport 6 Hours – 7th (with Holbert)
  • 1983 Road America IMSA GTP – 15th (with Holbert)
  • 1983 Pocono IMSA GTP – 36th, DNF (with Holbert)
  • 1983 3 Hours of Daytona – 1st (with Holbert and Trueman)
  • 1983 IMSA GTP Champhionship – 1st (with Holbert)
  • 1984 24 Hours of Daytona – 1st (with Sarel van der Merwe, Tony Martin, and Graham Duxbury)
  • 1984 Grand Prix of Miami – 8th (with van der Merwe and Martin)
  • 1984 12 Hours of Sebring – DNF (with van der Merwe, Martin, and Duxbury)
  • 1984 Lime Rock IMSA GTP – 1st (with van der Merwe)

It raced more than that but I’m not running down every race in multiple IMSA seasons. The car’s racing career ended after 1986. In 2003 the car was restored and was acquired by the present owner in 2005. It’s been used in several historic events including the Rennsport Reunion in 2004 and has been repainted to its 24 Hours of Daytona-winning livery. You can buy it for between $750,000-$1,000,000. Click here for more and here for more from Gooding at Amelia Island.

Update: Not sold.

MG NB Magnette

1936 MG NB Magnette Cresta Tourer by Enrico Bertelli

Offered by Bonhams | Oxford, U.K. | March 8, 2014

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

The MG N-Type was introduced in 1934 and the NB version came in 1935 and lasted through 1936. It was the final version, chronologically, but not alphabetically. It was also the most popular built (690 NA and NBs were built total with only handfuls of the other two models).

The engine is a 56 horsepower 1.3-liter straight-six. It was a sporty car for 1936 (remember that it weighs practically nothing). It could do 80 mph. What makes this particular car special, however, is the body. Cresta Motor Company was a dealer in West Sussex, England. One of the owners was an Aston Martin factory driver and he bought an NB Magnette but didn’t like the body. So he – and Cresta – sent 10 NBs to the Aston Martin designer Enrico Bertelli to have special bodies fitted.

So this is a special coachbuilt MG. One of only 10 or 12 built. The most recent restoration was carried out in 2001. It is one of three Cresta Tourers still in existence (although a fourth is rumored to be out there somewhere). It is one of the rarest MGs in the world and the price reflects it with a pre-sale estimate of between $130,000-$140,000. Click here for more info and here for the rest of Bonhams’ Oxford lineup.

Update: Not sold.

Alco Runabout

1909 Alco 40HP Runabout

Offered by Gooding & Company | Amelia Island, Florida | March 7, 2014

Photo - Gooding & Company

Photo – Gooding & Company

Alco was the shortened name of the American Locomotive Company – a company formed when seven small locomotive manufacturers combined in 1901. Automobiles arrived in 1906 (as licensed-built copies of French Berliet cars). In 1909 they switched to cars of their own design – and they were fantastic.

For 1910, the 40HP model would become known as the “Model 40” but for its introductory year it was known only by the power output of its 8.0-liter straight-four engine (in actuality it makes 42 horsepower). Alco lost an average of $500 on every car it made as it used, literally, the highest-quality materials available. Production ceased in 1913.

This one featured dual chain drive and arrived in the Indianapolis Speedway Museum in 1961, fully restored. The current owner acquired it in 2011 and the car still sports a 50-year-old restoration – and that is less than the halfway point of its life! When new, this car cost between $5,500 and $9,000. Today it should bring between $300,000-$400,000. It is one of only 12 Alcos known to still exist. Read more here and check out more from Gooding here.

Update: Sold $280,500.

The Winner of the 1968 24 Hours of Daytona

1968 Porsche 907 Longtail

Offered by Gooding & Company | Amelia Island, Florida | March 7, 2014

Photo - Gooding & Company

Photo – Gooding & Company

The Porsche 907 was, you guessed it, the successor to the 906 and the predecessor to the 908. (Well okay, the 910 was technically slotted between the 906 and 907, but that doesn’t make any numerical sense, now does it?).

Anyway, in 1967 Porsche introduced the 907 at the 24 Hours of Le Mans gunning for a head start on the rule changes coming for 1968 that mandated smaller engines. The car you see here uses a screaming 278 horsepower 2.2-liter flat-eight. The 907 would bring Porsche it’s first 24 hour endurance victory – setting off a streak unlike any other in motorsports history (although corporate cousin Audi is trying its damnedest to top it).

The competition history for this car includes the following:

  • 1968 24 Hours of Daytona – 1st (with Vic Elford, Jochen Neerpasch, Rolf Stommelen, Jo Siffert, and Hans Herrmann)
  • 1968 1000km Monza – 2nd (with Neerpasch and Stommelen)
  • 1968 24 Hours of Le Mans – 29th, DNF (with Alex Soler-Roig and Rudi Lins)
  • 1969 24 Hours of Daytona – DNF (with Soler-Roig and Lins)
  • 1969 12 Hours of Sebring – 4th (with Soler-Roig and Lins)
  • 1970 1000km Monza – 15th, 1st in class (with Andre Wicky and Mario Cabral)
  • 1970 1000km Nurburgring – 9th, 1st in class (with Wicky and Cabral)
  • 1970 24 Hours of Le Mans – 23rd, DNF (with Wicky and Jean-Pierre Hanrioud)
  • 1971 1000km Monza – DNF (with Wicky and Peter Mattli)
  • 1971 24 Hours of Le Mans – 7th, 1st in class (with Mattli and Walter Brun)
  • 1972 1000km Monza – 4th, 1st in class (with Mattli and Herve Bayard)
  • 1972 24 Hours of Le Mans – 18th, 2nd in class (with Mattli, Brun, and Bayard)

What is most awesome about this car is that a later American owner tried to enter it in the 1998 24 Hours of Daytona because its performance from 1968 was on par with current cars. How cool would that have been?

This car was meticulously restored to 1968 race-ready condition and one of eight 907 Longtails built and one of only two that remain. It’s a very important racing Porsche that can be yours for between $3,500,000-$5,000,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

S/N: 907-005

Update: Sold $3,630,000.

BSA Scout

1935 BSA Scout Series I

Offered by Bonhams | Oxford, U.K. | March 8, 2014

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

The Birmingham Small Arms Company began motorized vehicle production in 1907 with some prototype cars. Motorcycles arrived in 1910 and would become the company’s signature product through the 1960s and into the 1970s. BSA motorcycles are some of the most classic British bikes from the era.

Early BSA cars were kind of a mess and it wasn’t until their fourth attempt at automobile production that they finally got it right (or as close to right as they would before realizing that maybe they should stick with motorcycles). The Scout was introduced in 1935 and used a 1.1-liter straight-four engine making 9 (RAC) horsepower (which I think is around 30hp in today’s terms).

The Scout was available in six series through 1939 and established BSA as a builder of reliable automobiles. Unfortunately the War killed any hopes of them continuing after the Scout ceased production. It’s a small, light car with really good looks. This one was a basket case when it was found in the 1970s and eventually restored to great condition. It’s a cool little car from a company better known for their two-wheelers. It should sell for between $10,000-$13,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Bonhams’ Oxford sale.

Update: Sold $20,249.

Kissel White Eagle

1929 Kissel Model 8-95 White Eagle Tourster

Offered by RM Auctions | Amelia Island, Florida | March 8, 2014

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

Hartford, Wisconsin’s Kissel Motor Car Company built a variety of automobiles between 1906 and 1930, the most famous being the Gold Bug Speedster. In 1927, they introduced a four-seater version of the Gold Bug and called it the White Eagle.

Kissel’s were high quality, luxurious and sporty. I would liken them to Aston Martin today – not track-ready but quick, plush and stylish. The White Eagle was available with a few different engines and this one carries a 4.0-liter Lycoming straight-eight making 95 horsepower. The styling was updated for 1929 as Kissel tried to stay in business and fend off the Depression.

The Tourster body style is ultra sporty for a four-door convertible. Look at the long, pillar-less side – I bet this thing looks downright bitchin’ with the top down. This is the only known 1929 Tourster model known to exist and it was purchased new in Canada. The restoration is older than 1991 and has been freshened since. It’s a beautiful car and it should bring between $80,000-$120,000. Click here for more info and here for the rest of RM’s Amelia Island lineup.

Update: Sold (or stolen) $60,500.

An American De Dion

1901 American De Dion New York Type Motorette

Offered by RM Auctions | Amelia Island, Florida | March 8, 2014

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

Jackpot. There are automobile manufacturers of the past that I know existed and I always assumed that any examples that still existed – if there were any at all – are locked away in permanent museums. And then along comes one at auction proving that the past does indeed survive.

De Dion-Bouton was one of the first automotive giants. Their empire was vast and they built many times more engines for other manufacturers (many of these were license deals) than they built cars. And they built a fair number of cars. In 1900, some businessmen in New York decided to build the De Dion-Bouton under license in Brooklyn. The American De Dion was built for 1900 and 1901 only before it was shut down for violating their license contract (they were of shoddy quality).

And the car you see here is one of what has to have been not too terribly many built and one of very few that likely survive. There were three American De Dion models offered and this is the New York Type (there was also a Brooklyn Type and a stodgy Doctor’s Brougham). The car uses De Dion’s famous 402cc single-cylinder engine making 3.5 horsepower.

This car was found in a barn in the 1960s – parasol top and all. In 1992 the engine was cleaned out and this all-original 101-year-old car completed the London-to-Brighton Run. The engine was rebuilt afterward but otherwise this car is as it left the factory – 113 years ago. It is incredible. You can buy it for between $140,000-$180,000. You can read more here and see more from RM here.

Update: Sold $115,500.

A Very Original B.N.C.

1930 B.N.C. Type 527 Voiturette

Offered by RM Auctions | Amelia Island, Florida | March 8, 2014

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

B.N.C. is not a household name when it comes to classic cars. They were only around from 1923 through 1935 and most of their cars were very sporty, competing in races at tracks such as Spa and Le Mans. The car you see here was actually raced during the very first race at Watkins Glen.

The Type 527 was a racing model that used a 927cc straight-four Ruby engine. This particular car had a Ford 2.2-liter V-8 dropped in it during the 1940s after it was purchased by an American in 1940. This car could be found at SCCA events throughout the East Coast in the immediate Post-War period and in 1948 it finished 8th overall in the inaugural Watkins Glen Grand Prix.

This car has been preserved and is pretty much all-original (except for the engine of course). And that’s pretty remarkable considering how much this thing has been raced in its life. It should sell for between $170,000-$220,000. You can check out more here and see more from this sale here.

Update: Sold $181,500.

Delahaye Torpedo Roadster

1937 Delahaye 135 Competition Court Torpedo Roadster by Figoni et Falaschi

Offered by RM Auctions | Amelia Island, Florida | March 8, 2014

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

There are cars that serious collectors must have. This is one of those cars. Figoni et Falaschi-bodied cars are some of the most desirable coachbuilt cars in the world. And the Delahaye Torpedo Roadster is one of their most iconic designs. It’s the teardrop bodystyle combined with open air motoring. It is Paris in the 1930s.

The Delahaye 135 was introduced in 1935 and it uses a 3.6-liter straight-six making 95 horsepower. The Competition Court version of the 135 was the top-of-the-line model and this chassis was shipped to Figoni et Falaschi to receive this body for Delahaye, who showed the car at least once before selling it.

This car arrived in New York in 1939 and has been in American ownership since. The engine was actually replaced in 1939 and painted red at some point. In 1970 it was freshened and repainted its original colors – the ones you see here. It’s been with the same owner for 50 years so this is the first time this car has come up for public sale in a long time.

Only 13 streamlined Figoni et Falaschi bodies like this would be built and this is one of only two short-chassis Torpedo Roadsters that still exist. This is a multi-million dollar car with an “estimate available upon request.” Click here for more info and here for more from RM at Amelia Island. And look at these lines – tell me it isn’t worth it:

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

Update: Sold $6,600,000.

Duesenberg SJ-494

1934 Duesenberg Model SJ Convertible Sedan by LeBaron

Offered by RM Auctions | Amelia Island, Florida | March 8, 2014

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

Another beautiful Duesenberg for sale at another top auction. This is a supercharged Model J (or “SJ”) and it is one done originally by Duesenberg – as many Model Js have been converted to this more desirable variant years later.

These cars would do speeds approaching 140 mph – which is insane considering it was 1934. Power was up to 320 with the supercharger attached to the 6.9-liter straight-eight engine. This car lost its supercharger at one point and has a dual-carb setup on it, good for almost 400 horsepower. Could you imagine doing 150 mph in this car!?

The car was owned by it’s first lady owner for about 10 years, appearing in a film during that time. It has had many owner since – including a former president of the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Club. The restoration is old but the car holds up incredibly well. This is the only LeBaron Convertible Sedan attached to an SJ – if you thought it wasn’t rare enough already.

Pre-sale estimate is $1,500,000-$1,750,000 and you can find out more here and see more form RM in Amelia Island here.

Update: Sold $1,567,500.