Saoutchik-bodied Talbot-Lago

1951 Talbot-Lago T26 Grand Sport Coupe by Saoutchik

Offered by Barrett-Jackson | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 13-21, 2018

Photo – Barrett-Jackson

It’s kind of crazy to think this car is from 1951, especially if you consider the golden age of coachbuilding to be in the 1930s. This was pretty late in the game to get a custom-bodied car from a major coachbuilder as luxury cars pretty much standardized themselves not too long after this car was built.

But it helped that there was such a luxurious manufacturer like Talbot-Lago still operating at this point. The T26 Grand Sport was new for 1948 and Talbot-Lago sent all of the road cars to coachbuilders (there were race cars bodied in-house). This one was bodied by the legendary Jacques Saoutchik and it’s pure art.

Under the hood you’ll find the 4.5-liter straight-six that pumps out 190 horsepower. This body is one-of-one and is from one of the most sought-after coachbuilders of the post-WWII era. Few T26 Grand Sports were built and even fewer remain. You’ll need at least a million to top the reserve, but in the meantime, check out more about this one here and see more from Barrett-Jackson’s ever-expanding Scottsdale lineup here.

Update: Not sold.

TVR 2500

1971 TVR 2500 Coupe

Offered by Bonhams | London, U.K. | December 6, 2017

Photo – Bonhams

The TVR Vixen of 1967 was an evolution of the Grantura that dated back another five years (the first Granturas go back to 1958, but the styling of the Series III cars is mostly represented here). While the styling may have been a carryover, the drivetrain underneath was the real news.

The first Vixens were powered by a 1.6-liter Ford unit. But the same year the Vixen was introduced, TVR also launched the Tuscan, which had a V-8 or V-6. Unfortunately neither of these engines met U.S. emissions standards so TVR built a best-of-both-worlds car: the 2500 (or as it was called in the U.S., the Vixen 2500).

Built in 1971 and 1972 only, the 2500 was powered by a 2.5-liter Triumph straight-six that made a modest 105 horsepower. This made it the most powerful Vixen model, but it lacked power when compared to its competition.

Fortunately, a recent owner of this particular example had this car restored in the 1990s. In the process, they hopped up the engine a little bit, making it more of a performer. Only 289 of these were built (though an extra 96 cars were constructed with a different chassis from the M Series… of which there was a “2500M” model that is unrelated to the car pictured above and the 96 “2500”s built on their shared chassis. Confused yet?).

This car should bring between $29,000-$34,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $33,845.

Copper-bodied Rolls-Royce

1937 Rolls-Royce Phantom III Sedanca de Ville by Freestone & Webb

Offered by Barrett-Jackson | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 13-21, 2018

Photo – Barrett-Jackson

The Phantom III was the third (obviously) Phantom model introduced by Rolls-Royce and the final large car introduced by the company before WWII. First shown in 1936, the company built just 727 examples before production was suspended in 1939. It did not return after the war.

The body that this car carries was actually custom built in 1946 for the car’s second owner, as it was originally supplied with a limousine body. Freestone & Webb of London built this over the top, yet still gorgeous Sedanca de Ville body in a style that could’ve certainly been built in 1937. The windswept fenders and running boards are brushed copper over steel, as is the radiator and other trim pieces.

The Phantom III was the first Rolls-Royce to be powered by a V-12 engine – and the last until the Silver Seraph went on sale in 1998. That V-12 is a 7.3-liter unit that makes an “adequate” amount of power (though in reality it was about 160 horsepower). This is a very striking automobile that has been making concours appearances since it was essentially new. It will be one of a few cars offered at Barrett-Jackson this January with a reserve. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Alfa Romeo GTC

1966 Alfa Romeo Giulia GTC

Offered by Coys | London, U.K. | December 5, 2017

Photo – Coys

Shortly before the Giulietta went out of production, Alfa Romeo introduced the Giulia Sprint GT (in 1963), which was based on a shortened version of the Giulia sedan’s chassis. It, and later cars like the GTV, would be hugely successful and are sought after by those in the know today.

First shown in 1965, the Giulia GTC was a convertible version of the Sprint GT. The convertible conversion was handled by Carrozzeria Touring and the result is fantastic. The coupes are great looking cars in their own right, but who doesn’t want a little sun? The GTC is powered by a 1.6-liter straight-four making 105 horsepower.

Only about 1,000 of these were built in three years (there were about 100 assembled at the end of 1964). This is one of 45 right-hand-drive examples built in 1966 and one of just 292 GTCs built in 1966 total. This one has been restored at a decent cost and should bring between $130,000-$175,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Coys in December.

Two Bristol 411s

1970 Bristol 411 Series I

Offered by Bonhams | London, U.K. | December 2, 2017

Photo – Bonhams

The Bristol 411 was the replacement for the short lived 410. It debuted in 1969 and was built in five distinct series until 1976. We’ve previously featured a Series II car and what you see here is a Series I, which was built between 1969 and 1970.

The engine in the 411 was a 6.3-liter Chrysler V-8 making 335 horsepower. Top speed was 140 mph. For the Series II, Bristol added a self-leveling suspension. The styling would get an update for the Series III. Only about 50 examples of the Series I were produced, out of a total production run of 287 cars. This 77,000 mile example should bring between $79,000-$92,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.


1974 Bristol 411 Series IV

Offered by Bonhams | London, U.K. | December 6, 2017

Photo – Bonhams

The fourth series of the Bristol 411 was only sold in 1974. It sports the same styling as the Series III, with revised grille and headlight setup. The engine was also different as Bristol went with more displacement, installing a 6.6-liter version of Chrysler’s V-8. The larger engine wasn’t enough to counteract a lower compression ratio and stricter environmental guidelines as power dropped to 264 horsepower.

This example was restored over a five year period between 2006 and 2011. The Series IV had the shortest production run, but I’m not sure how many were built (of the 287 total). Always rare and always collectible, this Bristol should bring between $59,000-$72,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $58,459.

Ferrari 288 GTO

1985 Ferrari 288 GTO

Offered by Bonhams | London, U.K. | December 2, 2017

Photo – Bonhams

“GTO” are three exotic letters in the land of the prancing horse. Originally applied to the Ferrari 250 GTO, the most expensive car in the world, Ferrari brought it back in the 1980s. Sort of related to the comparatively lackluster Ferrari 308 GTB, the 288 GTO was destined to be a homologation special so Ferrari could go racing in a Group B Circuit series that ultimately never materialized. You could call it Ferrari’s first supercar.

The mid-rear-mounted engine is a twin-turbo 2.9-liter V-8 making 400 horsepower. The car hits 60 mph in five seconds and tops out at 179 mph. When new, this car cost significantly more than even the best Rolls-Royce on sale in the 1980s. It was a true halo car.

Ferrari planned to build 200 examples but ended up at 278 when it was all said and done. This makes it rarer than the Ferrari halo models that followed, such as the F40 and F50. This example was delivered new to the U.K. and sports over 14,000 miles. It has been enjoyed. It’s had major service done and is ready for the next owner to pack on some more miles. Once kind of a supercar bargain, the 288 GTO now out-prices the Ferrari supercars that followed it. This one should bring between $2,600,000-$3,300,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Marmon Sixteen Convertible Coupe

1932 Marmon Sixteen Convertible Coupe by LeBaron

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | New York, New York | December 6, 2017

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Marmon of Indianapolis introduced their Sixteen model in 1931. It was their top-of-the-line model that year, sitting alongside three different eight-cylinder models. In 1932 the Sixteen was offered alongside a single eight-cylinder model. 1933 was Marmon’s last and the brilliant Sixteen was the only model you could get.

There haven’t been many sixteen cylinder cars in history. Cadillac’s V-16 was the chief rival for this car, as were cars like the Duesenberg Model J. The engine here is an 8.0-liter V-16 that makes 200 horsepower. That kind of power aimed it squarely at the Model J. In 1931, a Marmon Sixteen Convertible Coupe would set you back $5,300. A Model J would’ve cost $9,500 as a bare chassis. The body was extra.

This particular car was purchased by Bill Harrah and restored in the 1960s. It’s next owner didn’t acquire the car until 1987 and the current owners bought it from him. It still sports Harrah’s restoration, a testament to the quality of work he pursued for his cars. Fewer than 400 Marmon Sixteens were built and eight with with this body style are known to exist. They do not change hands often. It should bring between $1,000,000 and $1,200,000. Click here for more info and here for the rest of the lots in this sale.

Update: Sold $962,000.

Peugeot D3A

1955 Peugeot D3A

Offered by Historics at Brooklands | November 25, 2017

Photo – Historics at Brooklands

Chenard et Walcker was a French automobile manufacturer that built some fantastic cars before WWII. After WWII, car production never resumed, but they did get into the van business. Their corporate overlords, Chausson, was bought out by Peugeot and Chenard’s little van was re-branded as a Peugeot for 1950.

The D3 was originally introduced in 1947 and it was replaced by the D4 in late 1955, making this example from the last year of D3 production. The D4 would last another 10 years. It’s a forward control van, meaning the engine was sort of between the front passengers and you sat with your feet pressed against the front of the van, making you the crumple zone in the event of an accident.

This D3A is powered by a 1.3-liter straight-four making 32 horsepower. It was a direct rival to Citroen’s ubiquitous H-Van. Most of these were used and abused so to find one in such great condition is a treat. Peugeot built about 75,000 of these between the D3 and D4, but this is as nice of one as you’re likely to find. It should sell for between $10,500-$15,750. Click here for more info and here for the rest of Historics’ lineup.

Pagani Huayra

2014 Pagani Huayra

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | New York, New York | December 6, 2017

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The vowel-laden Huayra is Pagani’s most recent model, going on sale in 2012. Only 100 coupes were built, with a Roadster version supposedly going on sale this year. That means, if you buy this car, you will own 1% of all Pagani Huayra Coupes.

Horacio Pagani‘s engine deal is with Mercedes-Benz’s AMG division and they supply the 6.0-liter twin-turbo V-12 that sits behind the driver. Horsepower is rated at 720 and the top speed is 238 mph. This 4,900 mile example is #78 of the 100 built. Huayras feature gullwing doors and active aerodynamics that make it a supercar that can do more than just fly in a straight line.

Pretty much each example was built-to-order and no two are quite alike. This one was delivered new to San Francisco and is being sold by its first and only owner. Costing around $2,000,000 when new, this is (I think) the second one to come up for auction (Gooding & Company has another one in Arizona this coming January and RM had one a few months ago in Monterey). The estimate is $1,900,000-$2,300,000… so with the as-new price in mind, it will be interesting to see if this brings a solid return on investment. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $1,850,000.

November 2017 Auction Highlights

November started off with one of our favorite sales of the year, Bonhams’ London-to-Brighton. We featured nearly half the cars in the sale and some for big money, including $376,362 for the Westfield and $295,610 for the Germain, but neither of those were enough to be this year’s top seller, which was this $428,230 1903 Panhard et Levassor Model B 10HP Four-Cylinder Rear-Entrance Tonneau.

Photo – Bonhams

The Eldredge and the Santler failed to sell, but the Salvesen Steam Cart brought $207,516. Some of the lighter cars that sold were the Toledo Steam car for $34,673, the La Libellule Tricar for $42,211, and the Royal Enfield Quadricycle for $66,332. Another Quadricycle, the Daley, sold for $39,196.

A previously featured Humber finally found a new home for $81,250. The rest of our feature cars all sold with the Vivinus bringing $76,845, the Ader $117,221, and the Schaudel $192,834. Click here for the other sales.

This 1925 Bugatti Type 35 was the top sale at Artcurial’s sale in Paris. It went for $1,669,913.

Photo – Artcurial

The similar-looking G.A.R. cyclecar we featured sold for $20,750, a comparative bargain. Click here for the rest of the results.

Next up, Silverstone Auctions’ NEC Classic Motor Show Sale. The top seller was this 2010 Ferrari 458 Italia for $181,032. The TVR Tina failed to meet its reserve. Click here for more results.

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

Onward to Aguttes’ sale in Lyon. No feature cars here, but the top seller was this 1970 Alpine A110 1600 S that sold for $102,478. Click here for other sales.

Photo – Aguttes

Finally, Mecum in Las Vegas. The top sale here was $600,000 for this 1968 Chevrolet Camaro Yenko.

Photo – Mecum

We featured three beautiful American station wagons from this sale and their results are as follows: ’48 Buick –  not sold, high bid of $26,000; ’53 Chrysler – sold, $48,000; ’69 Dodge Coronet – not sold, high bid of $13,000. Click here for the rest of the results.