Bristol 406

1961 Bristol 406

Offered by H&H Classics | Duxford, U.K. | March 20, 2019

Photo – H&H Classics

The Bristol 404 and 405 were a 2-door coupe or a 4-door sedan/2-door convertible, respectively. In 1958, they gave way to this, the 2-door 406 coupe. Naturally, it would be replaced by the 407 in 1961.

The 406 was the final Bristol to use the, by then, antiquated BMW-based 2.2-liter straight-six. While the engine was larger than in previous models, the power output was unchanged at 105 horsepower, which left the Bristol in the dust of most of its competitors. So the company had to make up for it in luxury and engineering. For instance, it was one of the first cars to receive 4-wheel disc brakes.

The 406 is not all that rare by Bristol standards, with a whopping 174 units produced in its short production run. This nice example is selling at no reserve. Click here for more info and here for more from H&H Classics.

1902 Gardner-Serpollet

1902 Gardner-Serpollet Type F

Offered by Osenat | Fontainebleau, France | March 23, 2019

Photo – Osenat

Gardner-Serpollet was a car engineered by Leon Serpollet, an important figure in the pioneering days of the automobile. He invented the flash boiler and built steam cars under his name as well as under the Gardner-Serpollet name after joining forces with Frank Gardner, a wealthy American.

This early steam-powered Type F features a flat-four engine fed by a flash boiler running on kerosene. It has chain drive and will apparently cruise for 50-75 miles before… running out of steam. It looks remarkably ancient compared to this 1904 Gardner-Serpollet. A lot changed in terms of automotive design in only two years time.

Fun fact, Leon Serpollet was the first person to set a land speed record in a non-electric automobile. This particular car was not used for that feat, but it does have known history to 1959 and has been more recently restored. It should sell for between $225,000-$285,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

March 2019 Auction Highlights

We’ll start off our March rundown with Historics at Brooklands where the top sale was this 1956 Bentley S1 Continental Coupe by Park Ward that brought $195,961.

Photo – Historics at Brooklands

A previously-featured Railton woodie wagon sold here for $36,371. Click here for more results.

We stay in Britain for Brightwells’ Leominster sale where our lone feature car, the Jaguar XJS Monaco, failed to sell. The top seller was this 1989 Ferrari 328 GTS for $75,101. Click here for additional results.

Photo – Brightwells

Onward now to Amelia Island and Bonhams, where we featured a lot of interesting cars. Remarkably, only one of them didn’t sell according to Bonhams’ results: the 1910 Pope-Hartford that was supposed to be offered without reserve. Not sure what’s going on there.

On the open-wheel side of things, Michael Andretti’s CART car sold for $56,000, while Jacky Ickx’s Brabham was our biggest money feature car at $1,105,000. That leads us to the overall top sale, this 1930 Cadillac Series 452 V-16 Fleetwood Roadster for $1,187,500.

Photo – Bonhams

Other $100k+ cars included the 1904 Peerless for $698,000, the Thomas Flyer for $489,000, the Welch tourer for $456,000, the Tincher for $423,000, the 1906 Pope-Toledo for $318,500, the Matheson for $212,800, the Haynes-Apperson for $190,400, the Stevens-Duryea for $173,600, the 1910 Knox for $156,800, the 1904 Pope-Toledo for $134,400, and the three-wheeled Knox for $106,400.

Relative deals consisted of the $62,720 Columbus and the $60,480 Crow-Elkhart. A previously-featured 1904 Knox sold here for $252,000. Final results can be found here.

We also featured quite a few cars from the RM Sotheby’s sale in Amelia Island, including some we featured from past sales like this 1924 Isotta Fraschini, this V-12 Cadillac, this AAR Eagle – all three of which failed to sell. The big-dollar Bugatti failed to find a new home as well. The overall top sale was the 1930 Duesenberg we featured. It sold for $1,650,000. We will award Most Interesting to this wicker-bodied 1911 Napier 15HP Victoria that brought $156,800.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Other classics that found homes included the Delaunay-Belleville for $196,000 and the 1926 Hispano-Suiza for $1,352,500. The Lotus T125 brought $417,500, while previously-featured cars that sold included the Bugatti Sang Noir for $1,500,000 and this Stoddard-Dayton for $190,400. Check our further results here.

Gooding & Company’s Amelia Island sale saw this 1930 Packard Eight Series 734 Speedster sell for $1,765,000.

Photo – Gooding & Company

Of our feature cars, the OSCA 1600 GT sold for $489,000 and the Kurtis $263,200. A previously-featured Abarth 207/A went for $362,500. Click here for complete results.

1939 Imperial

1939 Chrysler Imperial Sedan

Offered by H&H Classics | Duxford, U.K. | March 20, 2019

Photo – H&H Classics

The Imperial is one of Chrysler‘s classic nameplates. Last used on a kind-of-sad Y-body sedan in 1993, the name dates to 1926. Between 1931 and 1933, Imperials were the best product Chrysler had and rivaled the best from Cadillacand Lincoln. And for a little while, Imperial was a brand in its own right.

The 1937-1939 Imperial was produced in fairly limited numbers and in two distinct series. This five-passenger sedan model has an unknown production total, as sedan production between the Imperial, Saratoga, and New Yorker combined to total 10,536 units. It’s a C-23 series Imperial (the Custom Imperial C-24 cars were even more expensive and much rarer).

The 5.3-liter inline-six was good for 130 horsepower and a 95 mph top speed. This particular car was assembled as a knock-down kit in England and is said to be one of 16 right-hand drive examples built – and the only one remaining. It’s a big European version of a pre-war American sedan. It is being sold at no reserve. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Miller Shooting Brake

1954 Miller Shooting Brake

Offered by Bonhams | Goodwood, U.K. | April 7, 2019

Photo – Bonhams

Geoffrey Miller of Cornwall, England was a craftsman who had earlier built his own motorcycle when he decided to build himself a station wagon. This is the result, and it is the only such example. Most homebuilt cars look, well, home-built. However, this has all of the look of a series production car from 1950s England.

Somewhat Allard-like in its appearance, the four-door woodie wagon is powered by a 2.9-liter Austin-Healey straight-six. He used some production parts that were readily available but is said to have actually done the body and woodwork by hand.

With only three owners since new – including its creator – this is the time to get it if you want a car that is an original design. It’s quite interesting and should bring between $59,000-$72,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Bonhams.

Stutz Blackhawk

1973 Stutz Blackhawk

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Ft. Lauderdale, Florida | March 29-30, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

When Stutz was revived in 1968, it’s most famous product was the Virgil Exner-styled Blackhawk that was produced between 1971 and 1987. They were definitely a product of their time, but they kind of have a following and were pretty nice cars when new.

The original cars were based on Pontiac Grand Prix running gear, which was okay because they kind of looked like a gussied-up Grand Prix anyway. This particular car is described as having a “V8 engine” which is not too helpful as a variety of engines were used during the course of production.

The 1973 models were considered their own generation as the cars received annual updates during the first three years of production. These were expensive cars (they’d over $150,000 today), and there were a lot of celebrity owners, too. By the time production wrapped, about 600 examples had been produced. This one is expected to bring between $75,000-$105,000, which seems like a lot. Oh yeah, they also built other models that were essentially the same car but with four doors, which is kind of weird. Click here for more info about this car and here for more from this sale.

Salmson 2300 S

1954 Salmson 2300 S EX

Offered by Aguttes | Paris, France | March 17, 2019

Photo – Aguttes

Well apparently somethings don’t translate well from French to English. Perhaps “EX” isn’t the best trim level to add to a car called the 2300 S. At least there’s a space, right? Or is this just some romantic French thing?

Salmson is actually still around, though they haven’t produced a car since 1957 when they went bankrupt and Renault bought their factory. Today they’re an engineering firm that produces industrial products like hydraulic pumps. Exciting stuff.

Their last automotive hurrah was the 2300 Sport Coupe. Built between 1953 and 1957, Salmson entered sporting versions of the car in the 24 Hours of Le Mans three separate times. They were powered by 2.3-liter inline-fours capable of 103 horsepower.

Only 217 examples of the 2300 were built, and only 121 of those were the Sport models, like the one you see here, which is eligible for such events as the historical Mille Miglia. It should sell for between $75,000-$95,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

1910 Kenmore

1910 Kenmore Roadster

Offered by Mecum | Phoenix, Arizona | March 14-16, 2019

Photo – Mecum

The Kenmore Manufacturing Company of Chicago, Illinois, built cars for a short period of time: 1910 through 1912. Their cars were a little outdated from the get-go, carrying the styling of yesteryear. Ultimately, the company’s assets were acquired by Sears and their Kenmore appliance brand name is believed to have descended from this acquisition.

The 1910 Kenmore model line offered two options: the Model A and Model B, both two-cylinder cars on an 82″ wheelbase. The B had four additional horsepower, for a total of 18. Normally, I’d want to figure out if this car is an A or a B, but it has been bastardized with an electric motor according to the lot description, so it doesn’t really matter I guess (though it sure looks like an opposed twin is sitting under the front bonnet).

It does have a nifty flip-up wooden rear seat, which rules out the 2-passenger Runabout factory body style. Perhaps it is a 3-passenger Roadster or a 4-passenger Surrey. I don’t think two people are destined for that awful rear bench, so I went with Roadster. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum.

Bugatti 57SC by Corsica

1937 Bugatti Type 57SC Tourer by Corsica

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Amelia Island, Florida | March 9, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Type 57S and Type 57C were the ultimate versions of Bugatti’s long-lived Type 57. This marks the second Type 57SC we’ve featured, and both cars look as if they were bodied much more recently with replica coachwork. I guess there’s something just too low and sporty about these cars to believe that they could’ve possibly been designed in the 1930s.

The 57S was the lowered version and the 57C was the supercharged version. Only 40 57S cars were built, and most of them carried closed coachwork. Only 16 were drop-tops, including this one. What isn’t clear is when the supercharger was added to this car’s 3.3-liter straight-eight. What is for sure is that only two cars were built by the factory to 57SC specification. Most owners of 57S cars had superchargers fitted afterward, to bump power to that magical 200 horsepower mark.

Speeds of 120 mph were quoted in the day, making these as quick of cars as money could buy before WWII. This car was supercharged early in its life but was not originally built that way. The body is by Corsica, and it was separated from the chassis for 43 years before it was reunited and restored.

The rarity and beauty factors have the ability to push this car to near eight-figure territory. It’ll be interesting to see where this one ends up… if it sells. Click here for more info and here for the rest of the lineup from RM Sotheby’s.

Update: Not sold.

Kurtis Sports

1950 Kurtis Sports

Offered by Gooding & Company | Amelia Island, Florida | March 8, 2019

Photo – Gooding & Company

Look familiar? No this is not a Muntz Jet. It’s the pre-Muntz Jet: the Kurtis Sports. Race cars built by Frank Kurtis dominated the Indy 500 in the 1950s, and he built some road cars as well.

The first Sports was built in 1948 and was based on a wrecked 1941 Buick. Power is from a 5.4-liter Cadillac V8 making 160 horsepower. It’s a good-looking car – good enough that when Earl Madman Muntz acquired the production rights to the car and moved production to Illinois, he didn’t really have to change that much.

Only 16 examples of the Kurtis Sports were produced before it became the Muntz Jet. This example was restored by Arlen Kurtis, Frank’s son, and has pretty extensive ownership history. Extremely rare today, the car should bring between $275,000-$350,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $263,200.