Brabham BT5

1962 Brabham BT5

Offered by Bonhams | Paris, France | February 3, 2022

Photo – Bonhams

Motor Racing Developments Ltd. is commonly known as Brabham, as that’s the name their vehicles carried. The marque competed in Formula One for 30 years and had their cars entered in a variety of other series, including Indy Car, Formula Two, and Can-Am.

This sports racing prototype is the first of two BT5s built. In fact, Brabham only built 14 sports prototypes in total. The other 12 were BT8s. This one is powered by a Lotus-Ford 1.6-liter inline-four. It won races in England in period with driver Frank Gardner and came to the U.S. in 1963, competing in SCCA events thereafter and winning a championship in ’64.

More recently, the car competed in historic events in Europe and the U.S. It has a pre-sale estimate of $170,000-$200,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Hispano-Suiza Tourer

1912 Hispano-Suiza 15/20HP Tourer

Offered by Bonhams | Paris, France | February 3, 2022

Photo – Bonhams

We’ve featured our fair share of Hispano-Suiza cars over the years, most of which are of the 1920s-1930s coachbuilt variety. And nearly all of those were Hispano’s high-end luxury offerings with big six- and 12-cylinder engines. But this is slightly different.

Prior to the H6B of 1919, many of the company’s cars were simply given model names to reflect their output (especially pre-1910). The 15/20HP came out in 1910 was produced through 1914. The 2.6-liter inline-four made 20 horsepower.

Pre-1920 Hispano-Suizas are rarely seen, and this Spanish-built example is said to have remained in Spain for most of its life. It has a pre-sale estimate of $68,000-$91,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Shadow DN9B

1979 Shadow-Cosworth DN9B

Offered by Bonhams | Paris, France | February 3, 2022

Photo – Bonhams

Shadow Racing Cars competed in Formula One between 1973 and 1980 after having established themselves in Cam-Am. Success was scarce, but the team did score a win in 1977 and had a number of podiums over the years.

The DN9 was first entered in 1978 and used there for nearly 3/4 of the season. It returned in 1979 and was eventually upgraded to “B” spec. It’s powered by a 3.0-liter Ford-Cosworth V8. No details on the specific competition history for this chassis, but apparently it was used in 1979 by Jan Lammers. Lammers had a best finish of 9th that season and only seven finishes out of a total of 15 races.

This car was used in historic series over the years, and it was restored somtime after 2003, with just a few hours on the engine since being rebuilt. It carries a pre-sale estimate of $230,000-$280,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Aston Virage Wagon

1993 Aston Martin Virage Shooting Brake

Offered by Bonhams | Paris, France | February 3, 2022

Photo – Bonhams

Aston Martin was not at a particularly strong point in their history when they introduced the Virage at the tail end of the 1980s. This was just as their former models, which dated back to the 60s, were being phased out. The Virage would spawn the Vantage and eventually be sold as the “V8” alongside early DB7s.

The factory body style was a four-seat coupe. But this “Shooting Brake” (c’mon, it’s got four doors. You can call it a wagon) is one of seven such cars built by the factory for customers who demanded a little more versatility out of their sports cars. There were a few three-door versions as well, but only seven apparently got the four-door treatment. This was the first, and it’s shorter in length than the later ones.

Another thing Aston did was offer the upcoming Vantage’s 6.3-liter V8 as an option. And this car has it. It was rated at 456 horsepower when new. The whole build is a pretty much custom deal, with a 12″ stretch and a manual gearbox conversion. Certainly not something you see everyday, this Virage wagon is expected to bring between $170,000-$290,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

190E DTM

1991 Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.5-16 DTM

Offered by Bonhams | Paris, France | February 3, 2022

Photo – Bonhams

The 190E Evolution is one of the coolest homologation road-car specials of all time. And the because of the stellar job it did… homologating… we have this. The actual real-deal DTM version of the 190E 2.5-16.

This car is one of two campaigned by Team Snobeck during the 1991 DTM season. For 1992 and 1993 it competed with a privateer driver in the Belgian Procar series. The current livery is a replica of an entirely different team’s, because “the owner of the car likes it.” If you don’t like it, buy it and change it.

The car retains a race version of the road car’s 2.5-liter, 16-valve Cosworth-developed inline-four. In race spec, output is around 335 horsepower. This car is not only one of the most badass touring cars ever built, but it’s just stunning in presentation. The pre-sale estimate is $340,000-$460,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Bugatti Stelvio

1938 Bugatti Type 57C Stelvio Cabriolet by Gangloff

Offered by Bonhams | Paris, France | February 3, 2022

Photo – Bonhams

Bugatti’s Type 57 was the last new Bugatti to be introduced before the start of WWII. Which makes it the last true production Bugatti, as post-war models were never produced in much quantity and later models were… well… Italian or Volkswagens.

There were various 57s, including the C, which was sold from 1937 through 1940. It’s powered by a supercharged 3.3-liter inline-eight rated at 160 horsepower. The Stelvio was designed in-house at Bugatti as a four-seat cabriolet. This one, as were most, was actually bodied by Gangloff. It could be had on a standard, non-supercharged Type 57 as well.

These are very pretty, very desirable cars. The pre-sale estimate reflects it: $910,000-$1,400,000. This particular example has had the same owner since 1963 and has known ownership history since new. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Simpson Swift

2018 Simpson Swift

Offered by Bonhams | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 27, 2022

Photo – Bonhams

Simpson Design is a company based in Clinton, Washington, and headed by Jim Simpson. Well he was apparently a fan of the Michelotti-styled Ghia-Aigle Lotus XI of 1957, because he took a 2002 Miata and re-bodied it in the style of that unique Lotus.

The chassis is a custom unit, the bodywork is fiberglass, and the interior is fresh for this build. Power is from the Miata’s 142-horsepower, 1.8-liter inline-four. It’s kind of cool build that, depending on the angle, appears to have some classic-inspired lines or look somewhat awkward.

This presumably one-off car has a pre-sale estimate of $65,000-$85,000, which seems a bit optimistic for a car titled as a Mazda. Bonhams also has the wrong VIN printed in their listing, probably so no one Googles the VIN to discover that the car bid to $39,000 on Bring a Trailer back in September. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

OPAC Piu Prototype

1996 OPAC Piu Roadster Prototype

Offered by Bonhams | Paris, France | February 3, 2022

Photo – Bonhams

Opac S.r.l. is an Italian company whose services include building prototypes for other manufacturers, hardtop and soft top design and production, and various marine services. In the 1990s, they decided to build a prototype for their own brand.

The Piu is based on a contemporary Peugeot 106 XSi, which means it is powered by an inline-four displacing either 1.4 or 1.6 liters (that catalog description does not state if it’s based on a 1.4 or 1.6 XSi). Power outputs were 94 horsepower for the smaller motor and 102 for the larger.

The interior is a wild combination of yellow and blue suede… on everything. The car debuted at the 1996 Turin Motor Show and features a VHS player and a 10-disc CD changer. The current owner purchased the car, at the time in a state of disuse, directly from Opac. It now carries a pre-sale estimate of $45,000-$68,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

1902 Darracq

1902 Darracq 9HP Voiturette

Offered by Bonhams | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 27, 2022

Photo – Bonhams

Alexandre Darracq’s automotive family tree has a lot of branches. This particular car came from the original French Darracq concern, which was founded in 1896. In 1902, he sold the company to an English company, and from there on things get complicated. But we don’t have to go into that here, as this car came from the Parisian company.

This car is powered by a 1.3-liter single that made about nine horsepower new. The two-seater bodywork was due for restoration during ownership by the Harrah Collection. But it never took place, and the car remained with Harrah until 1986. It’s had two owners since.

Bonhams describes the car as “potentially London-to-Brighton eligible”, with the model year as “circa 1902.” In any event, it’s selling at no reserve. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Voisin C1

1921 Voisin C1 Limousine

Offered by Bonhams | Paris, France | February 3, 2022

Photo – Bonhams

Aviation pioneer Gabriel Voisin tried his hand at automobile production beginning in 1919. As the name might suggest, the C1 was the company’s first product. It would remain in production for a few years before being succeeded to quite a few different models.

Like all early Voisins, the car is powered by a Knight sleeve-valve engine. In this case, a 3.9-liter inline-four. The car was first registered in 1921 and was upgraded by the factory in 1925 with C3 brakes.

The body is a limousine with a partition between the front and rear passengers. The car was commandeered by the Germans during WWII and was purchased by the current owner in 1961. This early Voisin carries an estimate of $100,000-$150,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.