Wiesmann MF30

2001 Wiesmann MF30 Roadster

Offered by Oldtimer Galerie | Gstaad, Switzerland | December 29, 2019

Photo – Oldtimer Galerie

There have been a slew (three) of Wiesmanns being auctioned lately. And each of the three has been a different model. The MF30 was the company’s first product and was followed up by the MF3.

It’s powered by a 3.0-liter BMW inline-six good for 228 horsepower and 221 lb-ft of torque. It hit 60 mph in about five seconds and topped out at 143 mph.

This car is listed in the auction catalog as an MF3, which would’ve been powered by a 3.2-liter inline-six. The earlier MF30 was the 3.0-liter version, which is why I have it listed as such. There really aren’t many external differences between the two. No estimate is yet available, but you can see more here and see more from this sale here.

Alvis TC 108G

1957 Alvis TC 108G

Offered by Oldtimer Galerie | Gstaad, Switzerland | December 29, 2019

Photo – Oldtimer Galerie

The Alvis TC21 was a sedan and convertible produced by Alvis in the early 1950s and it carried a very old-school-style body. Swiss coachbuilder Graber designed an updated body for the TC21 that was very different and much more modern than what Alvis was offering. Alvis liked it so much that they decided to make it its own model.

Just 35 examples were produced between 1956 and 1958. Power is from a 3.0-liter inline-six that made 104 horsepower. Though the body was designed by Graber, Alvis outsourced some of the production to Willowbrook of Loughborough, though 19 of the cars were still bodied by Graber.

The entire ordeal was just too expensive, hence the low build number. Alvis canceled the Willowbrook contract and pivoted to Park Ward, who tweaked the design, which was then built as the TD21. You can read more about this Graber-bodied coupe here and see more from this sale here.

Monteverdi Sahara

1979 Monteverdi Sahara

Offered by Oldtimer Galerie | Toffen, Switzerland | October 19, 2019

Photo – Oldtimer Galerie

Peter Monteverdi’s Swiss car company produced some wild supercars, some Chrysler-based sedans, and some luxury off-roaders based on the very humble International Scout. Two such SUVs were produced: the Safari and the Sahara. Production began in 1977 and lasted through 1982, when IHC killed off the Scout.

Luxury SUVs were fairly rare in the late 1970s, and the Swiss market was pretty much limited to the Range Rover. Which is why Monteverdi pounced on the opportunity to offer a competitor. The Safari was bodied by Fissore, whereas the cheaper Sahara pretty much just used the Scout’s bodywork as-is.

This restored example is powered by a 5.7-liter IHC V8 good for 165 horsepower. The Sahara didn’t sell as well as the Safari, with as few as 30 examples having been built. This one is expected to bring between $30,000-$35,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Saurer M4

1954 Saurer MH4 Mannschaftstranporter

Offered by Oldtimer Galerie | Toffen, Switzerland | March 30, 2019

Photo – Oldtimer Galerie

We haven’t featured a military vehicle in some time, so I thought this slightly Axis-esque troop transporter would be a good fit. It was built by the Swiss company Saurer, a truck and bus manufacturer that existed between 1903 and 1982.

The MH4, as it was known to Saurer, or M4, as it was known to the Swiss army, was a troop transporter used between 1945 and 1985. Quite a long time, but I guess the Swiss really aren’t fighting that many wars, now are they?

Power here is from a 5.8-liter inline-four that should make about 75 horsepower and a lot more torque. They topped out at a little over 40 mph. You aren’t likely to run into another one when you’re out at the hardware store or toting the entire soccer team around. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Mosler MT900

2005 Mosler MT900

Offered by Oldtimer Galerie | Gstaad, Switzerland | December 29, 2018

Photo – Oldtimer Galerie

Warren Mosler really likes going fast. At least that’s what his automotive business ventures would lead you to believe. It started with the Consulier GTP that evolved into the Mosler Intruder/Raptor. And then in 2001, he launched the MT900. It’s a true American supercar, right there in the wonderful early-2000s when cars like the Saleen S7 and Ford GT were making waves. This thing is pretty awesome.

The base MT900 is powered by a 5.7-liter V8 making 350 horsepower. Not supercar numbers, but the chassis is carbon fiber and the entire car weighed less than 2,600 pounds. That meant it could hit 60 mph in 3.5 seconds on its way to a top speed of 150 mph.

Don’t worry though, they later built the MT900S (600 horsepower) and the MT900S Photon (same power, but less than 2,000 pounds). There were race versions too. In all, only 14 MT900 base cars were produced (there were also 20 S cars and 2 Photons in addition to about 30 race cars), making this car extremely rare. Switzerland may not like it, but it’s a great place to find weird, rare supercars. The pre-sale estimate here is “on request.” Click here for more info.

Note: The auction catalog lists this as a supercharged, 600 horsepower variant, which would make it an MT900S, but it isn’t listed as such. Perhaps the engine was modified later?

Borgward Isabella

1960 Borgward Isabella Coupe

Offered by Oldtimer Galerie | Toffen, Switzerland | October 20, 2018

Photo – Oldtimer Galerie

The Isabella was a car built by Carl F.W. Borgward GmbH between 1954 and 1962. It was the brand’s volume model and the one they are best remembered for. It was available as a two-door sedan, wagon, pickup, coupe, and convertible.

This car is powered by a 1.5-liter straight-four, as were all Isabellas. Power was rated at 75 horsepower and they were underpowered compared to their competition. The Coupe was not initially available and went on sale halfway through the production run.

Unfortunately, the company filed for bankruptcy in 1961 and various conspiracy theories persist to this day as to why, and Borgward himself died in 1963. It makes for an interesting read, but I don’t really want to go down that rabbit hole right now. This blue example should bring between $24,000-$26,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Coachbuilt Plymouth

1935 Plymouth Deluxe Model PJ Cabriolet by Tüscher

Offered by Oldtimer Galerie | Zurich, Switzerland | June 16, 2018

Photo – Oldtimer Galerie

When you think coachbuilt classics of the 1930s, Plymouth is likely not the first brand that comes to mind. When Chrysler introduced the Plymouth brand in 1928, it was a budget brand – the entry point into the marketplace for the Chrysler Corporation.

The 1935 line was called the Model PJ and it was available in three trims: the Standard Six, the Business Six, and the Deluxe. There were nine body styles offered on the Deluxe trim. Some of them were quite common, and others quite rare. But for the day, they were all inexpensive.

This particular car found its way to Switzerland where it was bodied by Tüscher in Zurich (they’re still around, building bus bodies). This was not the only 1930s Plymouth that they turned into an opulent convertible, either. You have to admit, this car looks downright diplomatic. I don’t have the exact history of its use or ownership, but the catalog listing does say it was very expensive when new, so it probably went to someone special.

It’s powered by a 3.3-liter straight-six that makes 82 horsepower. The restoration looks fantastic and is 10 years old. It should bring between $86,000-$96,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

1957 Packard Wagon

1957 Packard Clipper Country Sedan

Offered by Oldtimer Galerie | Zurich, Switzerland | June 16, 2018

Photo – Oldtimer Galerie

In 1953, Packard was acquired by Studebaker. It was a bid for survival for both marques that ultimately worked out better for Studebaker (but not by much). The last two years of Packard production were 1957 and 1958 and the cars they churned out in these model years were essentially just re-badged Studebakers.

For 1957, the Packard model line consisted of a lone model: the Clipper. Two body styles were offered: a four-door sedan and a four-door wagon. Interestingly, the 1958 model year had twice the offerings.

This six-passenger Country Sedan station wagon was one of just 869 examples built. It’s powered by a 4.7-liter V-8 rated at 275 horsepower. It was restored by a marque specialist and is finished in pretty lilac and white. Imported into Switzerland in 2010, this rare American wagon would be at home in any collection worldwide. It should bring between $55,000-$70,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Update: Sold, RM Sotheby’s Ft. Lauderdale 2019, $56,100.

Peugeot Quadrilette

1922 Peugeot Quadrilette Type 161

Offered by Oldtimer Galerie | Toffen, Switzerland | April 21, 2018

Photo – Oldtimer Galerie

Peugeot has been producing cars for a long time – longer than just about anyone else. Their cars have progressed through the years from early, simple cars to the most modern and sophisticated on the planet. The Quadrilette was a light car introduced after WWI as a small economy car.

This was an important step because Peugeot needed a success. This car was cheap and easy to produce at a time when people needed new cars. Two different models were offered, with the first, the Type 161, built in 1921 and 1922 only. The later Type 172 would be offered in 1923 and 1924.

The auction catalog lists this as a 1922 Type 172. But, there are some differences (aside from the listed model year) that clearly identify this as a Type 161. First, it features a 667cc straight-four that makes 9.5 horsepower (later cars had larger engines). This car also has offset seating – the Type 172 had two seats side-by-side up front.

The Type 161 is the rarer of the two, with only about 3,500 produced. This should bring between $10,000-$15,500. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Bond Equipe

1970 Bond Equipe 2-Litre GT Mk II

Offered by Oldtimer Galerie | Toffen, Switzerland | April 21, 2018

Photo – Oldtimer Galerie

Bond Cars Ltd was a British manufacturer primarily known for their three-wheeled vehicles, namely the Bond Minicar and the Bond Bug. The Equipe, which was introduced in 1963, was their first foray into the world of four-wheeled vehicles.

The Equipe was built through 1970 when Reliant, who had acquired Bond, shuttered Bond’s Preston, England, factory. There were five different Equipe models with this, the 2-Litre being available from 1967 through the end of production in 1970. A two-door Saloon and Convertible were offered. This is obviously the saloon. It’s powered by a 2.0-liter Triumph straight-four that made 95 horsepower (or 105 as the catalog states).

Styling on the 2-Litre differed rather dramatically from earlier cars and it was the final iteration of the model. In all, 591 examples of the two-door saloon were built, which makes it rarer than its convertible counterpart. This 48,000km example looks nice and will go under the hammer in Switzerland later this month. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.