GT Carbon Series

2021 Ford GT Carbon Series

Offered by Bring a Trailer Auctions | June 2024

Photo – Bring a Trailer

The second generation of the Ford GT was sold between the 2017 and 2022 model years. If you bought one new, Ford forced you to sign an agreement that you wouldn’t sell it for two years. Or, more so, they put a lien on the car that they would satisfy after exactly two years. If you sold it early, Ford would sue you. The best way around this was to register it to an LLC and then just sell the LLC.

Anyway, this race-bred street car features a whole lot of fancy technology that is backed by a twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter V6 that made 660 horsepower. Various special editions were offered, and this is a “Carbon Series,” which was actually a lightweight package that added gloss carbon-fiber wheels and exterior trim among other things.

It’s unclear how many of these “Carbon Series” cars were built, but Ford planned a run of 1,350 GTs total for this generation. These have been trading hands for over a million since they hit the resale market in 2019, and the bidding on this one is a dollar below that figure as of this writing. Click here for more info.

Lancia Astura by Pinin Farina

1939 Lancia Astura Series IV Convertible by Pinin Farina

Offered by Bonhams | Cheserex, Switzerland | June 2024

Photo – Bonhams

The Astura was one of two V8-powered cars Lancia sold during the 1930s, outlasting the Dilambda by an extra four years. It was produced from 1931 through 1939 across four series. This is a Series IV car, which were around from 1937 through the end of production.

Just 423 examples of the Series IV were built, each with power from a 3.0-liter V8 that made 82 horsepower. All 423 were long-wheelbase cars, and they also featured hydraulic brakes. These were coachbuilt cars, and this one was completed two weeks before the start of WWII and is an early example of Pinin Farina coachwork.

The rumor is that the car was owned by Mussolini at some point. It was later owned by Bernie Ecclestone. So… draw your own comparisons. It was restored in 2020 and has an estimate of $310,000-$450,000. Click here for more info.

B53 Aurelia

1952 Lancia Aurelia B53 Cabriolet by Pinin Farina

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Berkshire, U.K. | June 2024

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Lancia Aurelia was the first production car with a V6 engine. It was offered between 1950 and 1958, and during that time, the company produced more than a dozen different chassis codes across six series. There are a whole lot of different Aurelias.

This is a B53 chassis, which were only produced in 1952. In fact, only 86 B53s were made. The B53 was powered by a 2.0-liter V6 that made 70 horsepower. It was a chassis for coachbuilders, and this one was bodied by Pinin Farina.

The restoration was completed between 2006 and 2008, and it now has an estimate of $85,000-$110,000. More info can be found here.

Bristol 409

1966 Bristol 409

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Berkshire, England | June 2024

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Here’s the Bristol we’ve been missing. Between 1965 and 1967 Bristol churned out just 74 of these, which explains why it has taken so long for one to pop up at auction. It went on sale a year before the 408 exited production and quickly follow it out.

Power in the 409 is provided by a 5.2-liter Chrysler V8 that made 250 horsepower. It also has a three-speed automatic transmission. Yet another example of American power and European design.

This one was acquired by its current owner in 1994 and has been on display at a museum in Greece. It now has an estimate of $31,000-$44,000. Click here for more info.

TVR T350c

2001 TVR T350c

Offered by Iconic Auctioneers | Northamptonshire, U.K. | May 2024

Photo – Iconic Auctioneers

The T350 was the final model introduced by TVR before Peter Wheeler sold the company to Russian Nikolay Smolensky. It went on sale in 2002 and was sold alongside the car it was based on, the Tamora, until 2006.

Two variants were offered, the T350c (coupe) or the T350t (targa). Power is provided by a 3.6-liter inline-six that was rated at 350 horsepower. It could hit 60 in 4.4 seconds and topped out at around 190 mph.

Just 460 of these were produced (390 of which were coupes), and they were really the last of the TVR models. Only about 215 cars would be produced after the T350 ended production. This was the first T350 built and was used as a motor show display car, a press car, and TVR’s own car for three years before being sold. It now has an estimate of $37,000-$44,000. Click here for more info.

TVR T440R

2002 TVR T440R

Offered by Iconic Auctioneers | Northamptonshire, England | May 2024

Photo – Iconic Auctioneers

Peter Wheeler bought TVR in 1981 and transitioned the company from wedge-shaped sports cars into a company producing cars that reflected the era… and an era of that no one really saw coming. Cars of the early 90s begat some wild supercars by the year 2000.

The T440R was the second of two prototypes of a car that TVR hoped to homologate so they could race it at Le Mans. The first prototype was destroyed by the factory, leaving this as the sole example. It was initially powered by a 440-horsepower engine (hence the name) but has been restored with a 4.4-liter inline-six.

This car is a good representation of the final stretch of the Wheeler era at TVR: aspirational, wild, and rare. It now has an estimate of $240,000-$285,000. More info can be found here.

1967 White COE

1967 White 3000 COE

Offered by Mecum | Indianapolis, Indiana | May 2024

Photo – Mecum

The White Motor Car Company was founded in 1900 and primarily dabbled in steam cars in the early years before adding gasoline options around 1910. By the time the first world war ended, White decided to focus solely on trucks.

It was a wise move, as the company stuck around until 1980, at which time it went bankrupt with its assets being purchased by AB Volvo, the truck company. White-branded trucks continued to be offered until Volvo and GM merged their North American truck marques. Thus White-GMC was born (remember seeing those semis on the highway back in the ’90s?). Eventually the White name disappeared.

This cab-over-engine semi tractor from 1967 is powered by a 6.6-liter inline-six and features an electrically tilting cab, a dually rear axle, and some interesting styling. The truck is selling at no reserve. Click here for more info.

OSCA 1600 Cabriolet

1963 OSCA 1600 GT2 Cabriolet by Fissore

Offered by Bonhams | Monaco | May 2024

Photo – Bonhams

OSCA was founded by the Maserati brothers and produced some pretty cool cars during its short existence between 1947 and 1967. Around 1960 they introduced the 1600, which was a home-grown car powered by OSCA’s own 1.6-liter version of Lampredi’s Fiat inline-four.

Between 1960 and 1963, the company would build just 128 1600 GT models. This is one of only three cabriolets, and only two of those three had a tubular chassis. In this car, the OSCA inline-four made 105 horsepower.

This car was on Fissore’s stand at the 1963 Turin Motor Show, and it spent decades at a time across multiple collections in the U.S. and Europe. It now carries an estimate of $370,000-$430,000. More info can be found here.

The First Lotus F1 Car

1957 Lotus-Climax 12

Offered by Bonhams | Monaco | May 2024

Photo – Bonhams

Lotus’s track-focused cars built prior to this were mostly of the sports racing/prototype variety. The 12 was unveiled at the 1956 London Motor Show but wouldn’t hit the track until 1957. That first year it contested three F2 races, one each at Silverstone, Goodwood, and Oulton Park. Drivers Henry Taylor and Graham Hill split driving duties.

After a few more F2 outings in 1958, the car was ready to step up to F1. It was Lotus’s – and Graham Hill’s – first Formula One appearance when the car appeared at the 1958 Monaco Grand Prix. The competition history for this chassis, 353, includes:

  • 1958 Monaco Grand Prix – 9th, DNF (with Graham Hill)
  • 1958 Dutch Grand Prix – 14th, DNF (with Hill)
  • 1958 Belgian Grand Prix – 13th, DNF (with Hill)

Then it was back to F2 for some events in 1958 and 1959. And don’t think the 12 was an F1 dud. Hill’s teammate in ’58 was Cliff Allison, and Allison finished 6th, 6th, and 4th, respectively, in the same outings Hill had.

Power in the car is from a Coventry Climax inline-four. The car was purchased by its current owner in 1991 and was later restored. Quite the specimen of F1 and Lotus history, the car could fetch between $310,000-$420,000. You can read more about it here.

Drogo-Bodied 250 GT Coupe

1960 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe by Carrozzeria Sports Cars

Offered by Bonhams | Monaco | May 2024

Photo – Bonhams

If you’re thinking that this car looks vaguely 250 GTO-ish (or vaguely like an Iso Grifo from the cowl back), well, you aren’t crazy. What we have here is a Ferrari 250 GT that was sold new as a Pinin Farina-bodied coupe.

That coupe, powered by a 3.0-liter Colombo V12, was crashed in Switzerland in 1965. It was sent back to Modena, where the chassis was shortened and the car was subsequently rebodied by Piero Drogo’s Carrozzeria Sports Cars. In the 1970s it was crashed again, this time in France, with repairs carried out by Sbarro.

There are definite GTO influences, but the design is a one-off. More modern re-bodied 250 GTs tend to barely break into the seven figures, depending on what they’ve been re-bodied as. Yet this one, because of its period rebody, has an estimate of $2,700,000-$3,200,000. More info can be found here.