Enfield Electric

1974 Enfield 8000

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | June 10, 2015

Photo - Brightwells

Photo – Brightwells

We’ve featured a lot of microcars on this site – but not this one. Enfield is a name that goes back a long way in British automobiledom. Royal Enfield built fantastic motorcycles prior to WWII. But this brand is not related to that one at all.

This company, Enfield Automotive, was founded in the 1960s in the U.K. It moved to Greece in 1973, but the cars were still built on the Isle of Wight. Many of this cars’ parts were from or based on readily available cars of the time, such as the Mini and Hillman Imp. The body is aluminium and it is powered by an eight horsepower electric motor.

There are two seats and this one looks to need a little work (it’s probably not a driver). It had a top speed of between 48 mph and a range of around 40  miles. Only 120 of these were built between 1973 and 1977. It’s tiny – but if you want an electric car project, here you go. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $5,400.

Hesketh 308

1974 Hesketh 308

Offered by RM Auctions | Monaco | May 10, 2014

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

The recent film Rush really put the spotlight back on James Hunt – one of F1s legendary personalities. It also shined a light on the Hesketh team – the coolest team in F1 history. The Hesketh 308 was the team’s first car designed in-house. And this is the first (of three) examples built.

If you were to believe the movie, this car was designed in a barn by Harvey Postlewaite (it was actually desienged by Postlewaite, location unconfirmed). The engine is a 3.0-liter Ford-Cosworth V-8 making 485 horsepower. This car was quick from the outset – shocking Hesketh’s rivals. This car was entered in two non-F1 races before the team moved to another car. It was driven in period by James Hunt and Alan Jones. This is an incredible opportunity to acquire a race car from one of the most storied F1 teams in history. It should sell for between $480,000-$890,000. Yes, that’s a big range. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $385,308.

Five Classic F1 Racers

Classic F1 Racers

Offered by RM Auctions | Monaco | May 10, 2014

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1974 Hesketh 308

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

The recent film Rush really put the spotlight back on James Hunt – one of F1s legendary personalities. It also shined a light on the Hesketh team – the coolest team in F1 history. The Hesketh 308 was the team’s first car designed in-house. And this is the first (of three) examples built.

If you were to believe the movie, this car was designed in a barn by Harvey Postlewaite (it was actually desienged by Postlewaite, location unconfirmed). The engine is a 3.0-liter Ford-Cosworth V-8 making 485 horsepower. This car was quick from the outset – shocking Hesketh’s rivals. This car was entered in two non-F1 races before the team moved to another car. It was driven in period by James Hunt and Alan Jones. This is an incredible opportunity to acquire a race car from one of the most storied F1 teams in history. It should sell for between $480,000-$890,000. Yes, that’s a big range. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $385,308.

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1980 Tyrrell 010

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

Ken Tyrrell’s Tyrrell Racing was active in Formula One from 1968 through 1998. That’s a pretty solid run, lined with streaks of fame, including the much-loved, six-wheeled P34. This car isn’t quite as exciting.

Candy Team Tyrrell ran cars for Jean-Pierre Jarier and Derek Daly for the complete 1980 season. The 010 debuted at the 1980 South African Grand Prix. This car, chassis 003 was first used by Daly at the 1980 Monaco Grand Prix. The engine is a 475 horsepower 3.0-liter Ford-Cosworth V-8.

This car competed in 17 races over two seasons and was driven by Daly, Jarier, Eddie Cheever, and Michele Alboreto. Its top finish was 5th (four times). It should sell for between $295,000-$390,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $246,597.

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1966 Brabham-Repco BT20

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

Driver Jack Brabham founded the Brabham Racing Organisation with designer Ron Tauranac in 1960. The team was commonly referred to as Brabham throughout its life. 1992 was the final season for the team that started as Brabham and had undergone a few name changes over the years.

Brabham fielded cars for Jack Brabham and Denny Hulme for 1966. The BT20 used a Repco 3.0-liter V-8 making 300 horsepower. Denny Hulme drove this car on his way to winning the 1967 Championship. Hulme won the 1967 Monaco Grand Prix in this very machine. In my opinion, this is the second-coolest car F1 car of this sale, behind the Hesketh – although it is the coolest looking. It should sell for between $795,000-$985,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $1,502,701.

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1989 Ferrari F1-89

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

For 1989, Ferrari’s F1 car was the F1-89 – also known as the Ferrari 640. It was the first Ferrari F1 car for the new, non-turbo era. The engine is a 600 horsepower 3.5-liter V-12. and it was Gerhard Berger’s ride for part of the 1989 season. Unfortunately, F1-89 was plagued with reliability issues and this car DNF’d every race it was in. Which isn’t really a ringing endorsement – but then again, this is a Ferrari Formula One car you can own – and it will cost you between $825,000-$1,250,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $847,678.

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1982 Renault RE30B

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

The RE30B was an updated version of – you guessed it – the RE30. The RE30 won three races with Alain Prost in 1981 and the RE30B combined for four wins between Prost and Rene Arnoux in 1982. This was Arnoux’s car for eight races in 1982 – including three pole runs – Monaco, Imola, and Zandvoort. It was a great qualifier but never raced all that well. Its best finish was 10th at the 1982 Detroit Grand Prix. The engine in this car was a 560 horsepower twin-turbocharged 1.5-liter V-6. It is a relative bargain between $175,000-$220,000. Click here for more info and here for more from RM’s Monaco sale.

Update: Sold $315,953.

The 1974 Indianapolis 500 Winner

1974 McLaren M16C

Offered by RM Auctions | Monterey, California | August 16-17, 2013

1974 McLaren M16C

I guess I can get right to it: the competition history for this car includes:

  • 1973 Indianapolis 500 – 9th (with Johnny Rutherford)
  • 1974 Indianapolis 500 – 1st (with Rutherford)
  • 1974 Milwaukee 150 – 1st (with Rutherford)
  • 1974 Pocono 500 – 1st (with Rutherford)
  • 1974 Michigan 500 – 4th (with Rutherford)
  • 1974 Trenton 300 Race 1 – 4th (with Rutherford)
  • 1974 Trenton 300 Race 2 – 7th (with Rutherford)
  • 1974 Phoenix – 7th (with Rutherford)

As I think you’ll agree, only that second line really matters. It makes this car huge. Only a handful of Indianapolis 500 winning race cars are in private hands (that won prior to 1996). Rutherford started 25th, battled with A.J. Foyt for 50 laps and then took off, lapping every car on track with the exception of second place Bobby Unser – who finished 22 seconds behind J.R. That’s a beast of a race car and driver.

The M16C was introduced in 1973. This was a McLaren-factory car campaigned for the entire USAC season with Rutherford behind the wheel (Peter Revson was his teammate). This car won the pole at Indy in ’73. It was slightly redesigned for ’74 and Rutherford had to wait until Bump Day to make the field. This car was sold by McLaren to a privateer team, who failed to qualify for the 500 with it in 1977 and 1978.

When it was restored later on, the car was reverted to as it was in victory lane in 1974. It changed hands for a record price in 1991 and has been used (by Rutherford) at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. The engine is a 2.6-liter turbocharged Offenhauser straight-four making 800 horsepower. That’s more than current Indy cars. At any rate, it’s rare that a 500 winner can be bought. This one should sell for between $1,250,000-$1,750,000. Click here for more info and here for more from RM in Monterey.

Update: Sold $3,520,000.

S/N: M16C-5

A Chinese Classic

1974 Hongqi CA770

For Sale at The Auto Collections | Las Vegas, Nevada

1974 Hongqi CA770

Say what? This is actually a really exciting car to see for sale in the United States. The Chinese automobile industry is just starting to take off (I could throw some numbers at you but I won’t. I wrote a thesis-ish paper in college about two years ago regarding it but I don’t want to bore you). But the industry has actually been around longer than 10 years.

Hongqi (which means Red Flag, the name by which the cars are sometimes referred to in Western media) is owned by FAW (First Automobile Works). The cars were the first domestically produced passenger automobiles in China. They were introduced in 1958, essentially as a copy of a 1950s Chrysler. An update came in 1963 and it was known as the CA770, the car you see here.

They were built for elite members of the Communist Party. It used the same engine as its predecessor, a 197 horsepower 5.6-liter V-8 (also a Chrysler design). This model was produced until 1980. Only about 1,600 of these cars (and the earlier model) were made in total. So they are very rare to begin with.

Then you throw the curveball: this car is in the U.S. It is one of very few (it could be the only one) Chinese cars (and not those little electric things) in this country. It is almost certainly the only “classic” Chinese car to have reached these shores. No one’s really collecting them because most people don’t know they are out there. Russian cars have a little bit of a following, but this is a whole new ballgame. The Auto Collections bill it as “the very first collector car to ever be exchanged in the USA with China.” It’s interesting. It’s for sale. I want it, and any collector of interesting cars should too. Click here for more.

Ligier JS2

1974 Ligier JS2

Offered by Artcurial | Le Mans, France | July 7, 2012

Guy Ligier began his career as a rugby player before he went sportscar racing in the 1960s, which led to a brief Formula One ride with a privateer team. He moved on to his own race team but after his partner and friend, Jo Schlesser, was killed racing one of their Honda F1 cars, Ligier retired from driving and focused on building cars instead. The “JS” prefix is so named for Schlesser.

The JS2 was the second model made by the company and it was introduced in 1971. They were produced for both the road and the track – with racing being the focus (the Ligier name would appear on Formula One cars for 20 years). Only 280 copies of the JS2 were built. The one you see here is a race car – and an important one.

I like the “competition history” format we’ve used on other posts, so I’m doing it here again, too – even though the history is somewhat short:

  • 1974 Tour de France Automobile – 1st (with Gérard Larrousse, Jean-Pierre Nicolas and Johnny Rives)
  • 1975 24 Hours of Le Mans – 2nd (with Jean-Louis Lafosse and Guy Chasseuil)

The engine in this car is a 3.0-liter Cosworth DFV V8 making 460 horsepower and is one of only three factory JS2 race cars built and raced by Ligier. Only two survive and this one has more competition success than the other. However, it has been a while since this car was last used. As such, it is being sold “in need of an overhaul” and comes with a variety of spares.

There are other rare Ligers at this sale – you can find them here. This one is expected to bring between $935,000-$1,350,000. For more information, click here.

Update: Did not sell.