Aston V12 Speedster

2021 Aston Martin V12 Speedster

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Munich, Germany | November 2024

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Aston Martin loves them some special editions of their popular cars. In this case, the base car was the current generation of the Vantage, but with the twin-turbocharged 5.2-liter V12 from the DBS Superleggera stuffed under the front hood (this also necessitated the use of, basically, the DBS’s front clip to accommodate the engine). Remember, this car came out before the V12 Vantage debuted.

Output was rated at 690 horsepower, which is about 25 less than the DBS. The styling was inspired by the DBR1 that won Le Mans in 1959. It’s a two-seater with no windscreens or top, but it does have two little pods behind the headrests to store helmets.

Just 88 were built, and this car is #61. It has an estimate of $850,000-$1,150,000. More info can be found here.

Aston Martin Valkyrie

2023 Aston Martin Valkyrie Coupe

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Dubai, U.A.E. | March 2024

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Valkyrie is one of these new-era supercars with complicated Formula One-style hybrid powertrains that languish in a development period for years before finally coming to market long after everyone’s initial excitement has worn off. The Valkyrie name was chosen after a bunch of other code names were used following the car’s 2016 (!) introduction.

Or maybe it was more of a tease than in introduction. Anyway, production didn’t commence until late 2021. They said they will only build 150 of these with a retail price of about $3,500,000 when new.

Power comes from a 6.5-liter V12 that has been tweaked by Cosworth to produce around 1,000 horsepower. Additionally, it has an electric boost system that can add another 160 horsepower. Aston has since added a track-only variant as well as an open-top Spider.

The estimate on this one is $2,900,000-$3,300,000. Click here for more info.

DB2/4 by Bertone

1954 Aston Martin DB2/4 Coupe by Bertone

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | New York, New York | December 8, 2023

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The DB2 was Aston’s first real post-war car, as they only made 15 DB1s. In 1953, the DB2 was heavily revised for a new model call the DB2/4, which would remain on sale through 1957. Three factory body styles existed: drophead coupe, two-seat coupe, and 2+2 hatchback. But a number of coachbuilt versions were also produced.

Among them are a some really striking designs by Bertone. There were seven Bertone DB2/4s in total (out of a production run of 764 total DB2/4s), and all of them were commissioned by Stanley “Wacky” Arnolt. This was the only coupe among them.

RM’s write-up makes no mention of the engine, but it’s a 2.9-liter inline-six, the larger of two engines offered during the model’s run. The restoration of the car started in 2019 and completed in time for Pebble Beach in 2023. The estimate here is $1,200,000-$1,600,000. Click here for more info.

Two-Door Lagonda

1986 Aston Martin Virage Coupe Prototype

Offered by Bonhams | Goodwood, U.K. | September 9, 2023

Photo – Bonhams

The Aston Martin Virage debuted for 1989 and was produced in its boxy gloriousness through 2000. But it wasn’t this boxy. This prototype wasn’t meant to signal the design language of the company’s upcoming near-supercar, it was just convenient to use a shortened Lagonda as a test mule.

But it also allows us to see the answer to the question “What if they made a two-door Lagonda.” Well, it’s kinda neat. Sure, it definitely looks like its been chopped a bit, but you can also still kind of see the upcoming Virage in its shape and front end.

It was powered by a 5.3-liter V8 and, after testing duty, was parked in the service department, only to be spotted by an Aston customer who wanted to buy it. It was overhauled by the factory and fitted with a contemporary Virage engine in 1993. It’s a pretty neat, one-off thing, and it can be yours for between $315,000-$440,000. Click here for more info.

DB2/4 Indiana Spider

1954 Aston Martin DB2/4 Indiana Spider by Bertone

Offered by Gooding & Company | London, U.K. | September 1, 2023

Photo – Gooding & Company

This car looks like a toy. It certainly looks different from other DB2/4s, with its more aggressive grille and fixed, rounded windshield frame. The car was styled by Franco Scaglione at Bertone and was built for Stanley “Wacky” Arnolt of Arnolt-Bristol (among others) fame.

The DB2/4 is powered by a 2.9-liter inline-six with twin SU carburetors for a factory-rated 140 horsepower. In the early 1950s, Arnolt partnered with Bertone to build the Arnolt-MG. In 1953, he then acquired eight DB2/4 chassis that he was going to have custom-bodied by Bertone to then sell as Arnolt-Astons.

Six of those were actually built, one disappeared, and the last one, this car, was bodied by Bertone to be Arnolt’s personal Aston Martin. It’s had many owners since and was most recently restored under 20 years ago. It now has an estimate of $1,500,000-$2,250,000. Click here for more info.

Aston DB2/4

1954 Aston Martin DB2/4

Offered by Bonhams | Brussels, Belgium | May 13, 2023

Photo – Bonhams

The DB2 was the first post-war Aston produced in significant numbers. A two-seater, it was replaced in 1953 by a 2+2 coupe. Called the DB2/4, the new car would be on sale through 1957 and would also be offered as a two-seat drophead coupe and a two-seat fixed-head coupe.

Power is provided by 2.6-liter inline-six that was rated at 125 horsepower. Later, a 2.9-liter unit would be available. Just 764 examples of the DB2/4 would be built, 565 of which were Mark I examples like this. The Mark II went on sale in 1955 with more power.

This car was sold new in Switzerland and was restored about 25 years ago. Still, it is said to require further work before being declared roadworthy. It carries a pre-sale estimate of $90,000-$155,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $146,300.

DB5

1964 Aston Martin DB5

Offered by Historics Auctioneers | London, U.K. | February 25, 2023

Photo – Historics Auctioneers

This is what you would call an absolute classic in its classic color. The DB5 was the James Bond car – so much so that it continues to pop up in later films. It was introduced in 1963 and sort of had an evolutionary design compared to that of the DB4 it replaced. In 1965, it was replaced by the DB6, which looked even more similar to the DB5 than the DB5 did to the DB4.

Power is from a 4.0-liter inline-six that was rated at 282 horsepower. That was enough for 145 mph, and Vantage options pushed power to over 300 horses. Convertibles and shooting brakes were also sold, although the latter were coachbuilt. But the 2+2 coupe is the most classic.

The alloy coachwork is from Touring Superleggera. Just 1,059 units were produced, and this was a British-market example that received a two-year restoration after 2017. The estimate is $590,000-$645,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $760,126.

’96 Aston Vantage

1996 Aston Martin Vantage Coupe

Offered by Bonhams | London, U.K. | December 16, 2022

Photo – Bonhams

The Aston Martin Virage debuted in 1989 at a low point for Aston Martin. These were pretty exclusive cars, with about 40 made on average each year. In 1993, the Vantage showed up, wearing pretty much the same bodywork but with a twin-supercharged 5.3-liter V8. Output was rated at 550 horsepower. This thing was a monster in the early 1990s.

Top speed was around 191 mph. The craziest part was this was the base Vantage. There were more extreme versions than this. Meanwhile Ford took over Aston and put the DB7 into production with an inline-six. It’s like it was from a different company than whoever created this thing.

Just 280 examples of the Vantage coupe were produced. A true supercar with grand touring proportions, this Vantage carries an estimate of $75,000-$125,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $124,424.

The Best DB7

2000 Aston Martin DB7 Vantage Volante

Offered by Aguttes | Paris, France | December 14, 2022

Photo – Aguttes

Dream spec. Fact: the Aston Martin DB7 is one of the best-looking cars of all time. And when they dropped a V12 under the hood and tweaked the styling a bit, they really ended up with a winner. Add on top of that the fact that this one is a drop top finished in Almond Green with over a beige and green interior… perfection.

The Vantage-specification DB7 went on sale in 1999 and featured a 5.9-liter V12 (as opposed to the earlier DB7’s straight-six) that made 420 horsepower. This manual-transmission car was capable of 60 mph in five seconds when new.

Having covered less than 10,000 miles since new, this Volante is a keeper. It has a pre-sale estimate of $73,000-$94,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold.

Aston DB3

1952 Aston Martin DB3

Offered by Bonhams | Chicester, U.K. | September 27, 2022

Photo – Bonhams

The DB3 was Aston Martin’s sports racing car for the early ’50s, with the cars being built in 1951 and 1952. It was their first post-war purpose-designed race car and was usurped by the somewhat-prettier and more famous DB3S in 1953. This car is number five of 10 built, and the the first five were all Aston team race cars. The remainder of the run were sold to privateers.

The first cars were powered by a 2.6-liter Lagonda inline-six, and later cars got a 2.9-liter version of the same powerplant that was good for up to 163 horsepower. This chassis has period competition history as a works racer, including:

  • 1952 24 Hours of Le Mans – 19th, DNF (with Lance Macklin and Peter Collins)
  • 1953 12 Hours of Sebring – 2nd (with George Abecassis and Reg Parnell)
  • 1953 Mille Miglia – DNF (with Abecassis)

The nose was damaged during the Mille Miglia DNF. The entire body was removed, and the rolling chassis was sold to a driver who fitted a closed body. It wasn’t until 1990 that the car was restored with an original-style DB3 body. Now, this incredibly rare 1950s race car is offered with “estimate upon request.” You can read more about it here.

Update: Not sold.