Morgan-Monotrace Torpedo

1926 Morgan-Monotrace TMX Torpedo

Offered by Gooding & Company | April 2024

Photo – Gooding & Company

What do you call a motorcycle with four wheels? That’s not the start of a joke, but a description of what we’re dealing with here. It’s essentially a two-passenger motorcycle with… training wheels.

The Monotrace was designed by a German firm called Mauser but were built under license in France by Mecanicarm of St. Etienne between 1925 and 1928. The marque was Morgan-Monotrace, and the company was unrelated the Britain’s Morgan Motor Company.

The engine is a 520cc single. It’s got tandem seating and chain drive. Approximately 310 were built, and this one was in the Schlumpf reserve collection before coming to the Mullin museum. Very few of these exist, and this project-status example has a reserve of $10,000-$15,000. Click here for more info.

1902 Prunel

1902 Prunel Model F

Offered by Gooding & Company | April 2024

Photo – Gooding & Company

Radiator as front bumper is always a good choice, isn’t it? Ste des Usines Prunel was founded outside of Paris in 1900 by a J. Prunel. The company initially marketed their cars under the Atlas marque for the first two years. Prunel didn’t appear on the cars until 1902, and they sort of faded away after 1907. The Phenix was built at the Prunel factory between 1912 through 1914.

This car was imported to the U.S. in 1962, at which time it was restored in New Jersey. It remained on display at the Briggs Cunningham Museum and the Crawford Auto-Aviation Museum for decades before being acquired by the Mullin museum in 1990.

The engine is a single-cylinder unit, and it’s not running because it’s been on display for so long. Still, an estimate of $30,000-$50,000 for a car of this age, condition, and rarity seems like a bargain here, running or not. Click here for more info.

The Last Voisin

1938 Voisin C30 Cabriolet by Dubos

Offered by Gooding & Company | April 2024

Photo – Gooding & Company

The C30 was the final Voisin road car. Sure, there was a post-war prototype, but this was the last real model from the company. Coupes and convertibles were offered, but only about 30 chassis were completed in total. The Mullin museum had a copy of each.

This one has cabriolet coachwork by Dubos. Earlier Voisins utilized Knight sleeve-valve engines, but by this late in the game, Voisin had switched to a more modern powerplant (but still American): a supercharged 3.5-liter Graham-Paige inline-six (interestingly, Gooding described the last C30 as have a 3.6-liter engine).

This car entered the museum in 2008 and has been on display since, so it’ll need some work if you want to use it. The estimate is $150,000-$250,000. More info can be found here.

Bedelia Cyclecar

1913 Bedelia Type 8 Sport Torpedo

Offered by Gooding & Company | April 2024

Photo – Gooding & Company

Bedelia was a French marque that existed between 1910 and 1925. Prime time for cyclecars, which were light, low-powered cars that were cheap and efficient. They were a fad, really. And one that never came back. They were kind of like the proto-microcar.

Some of them featured tandem seating like this car. In today’s world, being positioned behind your passengers as the driver seems insane. The car features a V-twin engine turned to the side, unlike a Morgan of the same era.

This is another car that was acquired by the Mullin museum from as part of the Schlumpf reserve collection. It’s a project, but finding another one isn’t going to be easy (they’re out there, though). The estimate is $10,000-$20,000. More info can be found here.

Bugatti Wagon

1927 Bugatti Type 40 Break de Chasse

Offered by Gooding & Company | April 2024

Photo – Gooding & Company

Bugatti’s Type 40 was produced from 1926 through 1930. In that time, just 796 examples were made, including this one, which originally wore sedan bodywork. The model was powered by a 1.5-liter inline-four.

But the story here is twofold. One, the bodywork. It was in the 1930s or ’40s when the car was rebodied with wooden rear coachwork. It bounced around France for a few years before story number two comes into play: ownership. In 1958 it was sold to American Bugatti collector John Shakespeare.

In 1964, Shakespeare made one of the worst decisions in the history of car collecting: he sold his entire collection to the Schlumpf brothers in France. The brothers, of course, assembled a massive hoard of cars, with a focus on Bugattis, at the expense of their hard-working employees, who eventually rioted and took control of the factory and collection. It now lives on as the national automotive museum of France. Everything in there, locked away forever, never to be enjoyed as they were meant to be: driven.

However, this car was part of the museum’s “reserve” collection. That is, “extras.” When you have the car collecting status that Peter Mullin did, sometimes you can escape some trapped cars, and he bought the entire Schlumpf reserve in 2008. He died recently, and Gooding is liquidating his museum. So, through some roundabout circumstances over 60 years, the car is resurfacing and may someday again be driven. The estimate is $100,000-$150,000. More info can be found here.

Marcos 2.5 Litre

1972 Marcos 2.5 Litre

Offered by H&H Classics | Buxton, U.K. | April 2024

Photo – H&H Classics

The Marcos GT, the basic shape of which carried over long after the model went out of production in 1990, was first introduced in 1964 in 1800 GT form. By 1967 a smaller displacement 1600 GT version was introduced. Then, two years later, they made the available engine bigger, with the Marcos 2 Litre.

The 3 Litre model debuted in ’68 with a Ford V6. In 1971, Marcos produced 12 examples with a Triumph 2.5-liter inline-six and sold them as the 2.5 Litre. That’s what this is. A rare bird indeed. Output was rated at 150 horsepower. All of these engines were originally intended for the company’s new Mantis model. But they were leftover, thus the shoehorning into the GT.

This example was upgraded under current ownership and has just under 80,000 miles. The pre-sale estimate is $17,750-$20,250. Click here for more info.

MG Q-Type Racer

1934 MG Q-Type Monoposto

Offered by Bonhams | Goodwood, U.K. | April 2024

Photo – Bonhams

The Q-Type was a purpose-built race car developed and built by MG in 1934. Just eight were produced, and they used modified MG K3 chassis and N-Type axles. There were two-seat examples and single seaters, with the latter (like this one here) being used at places like Brooklands.

They were originally powered by a supercharged 746cc inline-four good for about 113 horsepower. At some point in this car’s life, it was transplanted with 6.1-liter de Havilland Gipsy Major inline-four aircraft engine. Come 2009, most of what remained of the car was its bare chassis. Somehow the original hood was sourced and a replica body was built. During the rebuild it is said to have been given a supercharged P-Type engine that could push the car to almost 150 mph.

Before WWII, this car did compete at Brooklands and Donington Park. Well, the chassis did. Even still, only eight of these were built, and this one has an estimate of $175,000-$225,000. More info can be found here.

Kremer 917

1981 Porsche 917 K-81

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monaco | May 2024

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Porsche’s 917 is one of the most legendary race cars of all time. It was produced in quite a few variations after its 1969 introduction, including the quite famous 917K and the ultimate evolution: the 917/30.

Porsche stopped racing the 917 after the 1973 Can-Am season and moved on to the 936 for 1975. However, in 1981, Le Mans changed their rules and it sort of opened the door for the 917 to return to the 24 Hour. Porsche themselves didn’t have much interest, but Kremer Racing did. With the support of Porsche, they built a new 917 to Group 6 specifications and dubbed it the 917 K-81.

It’s a Kremer aluminum spaceframe chassis underneath similar to that of a Porsche-built 917, and it is powered by a 5.0-liter flat-12. The competition for this chassis consists of:

  • 1981 24 Hours of Le Mans – 38th, DNF (with Bob Wollek, Xavier Lapeyre, & Guy Chasseuil)
  • 1981 1000km Brand Hatch – 26th, DNF (Wollek & Henri Pescarolo)

Not super successful, and after Brands Hatch, that was it for the 917. The current owner acquired this car in 2011 and used it at various track days. The 5.0-liter engine was rebuilt recently, and the whole package has an estimate of $3,800,000-$5,500,000. Click here for more info.

British-Bodied Delage

1938 Delage D6-70 Cabriolet by Coachcraft

Offered by Osenat | Fontainebleau, France | March 2024

Photo – Osenat

The D6 was, perhaps, the most successful model Delage ever had. The launch model, the D6-11, went on sale in 1932. Eight more variants would be produced before production wrapped… in 1953. This car is a D6-70 chassis, a model that was only offered in 1937 and 1938.

Originally, it would’ve been powered by a 2.7-liter inline-six rated at 78 horsepower. However, this car was purchased by its current owner in 1985 as a project, and part of completing that project was upgrading the drivetrain to D6 Olympic specification, which resulted in the inline-six jumping to 3.0 liters and sporting three carburetors – a setup rated at 100 horsepower during D6 Olympic production from 1948 to 1949.

This car was one of few delivered new to the U.K., where it was bodied by Coachcraft. While it’s been parked since 2020, the car was used heavily under current ownership, being driven to lands as far away as Syria. Now it has an estimate of $43,500-$65,000. Click here for more info.

1918 Rochet-Schneider

1918 Rochet-Schneider 16500 Coupe-Chauffeur by Billeter and Cartier

Offered by Osenat | Fontainebleau, France | March 2024

Photo – Osenat

Rochet-Schneider was a French manufacturer that came into being when Edouard Rochet’s car company was joined by Theophile Schneider in 1905/1906. The company soldiered on until 1932, with its later years mostly focused on commercial vehicles (though passenger cars were still available).

This car carries the preposterous model name of “16500.” It is powered by a hefty 40-horsepower inline-four that is mated to a four-speed manual transmission. It is apparently capable of 55 mph.

It has been restored and sports town car bodywork by Billeter & Cartier of Lyon. It has an estimate of $55,000-$87,000. Click here for more info.