BMW Z8

2001 BMW Z8

Offered by Mecum | Monterey, California | August 14, 2021

Photo – Mecum

The Z8 was BMW’s retro-inspired halo car that was sold between 2000 and 2002, with a revised Alpina Roadster available for 2003. The car was styled after BMW’s legendary 507 (one of, if not the first, car this site featured was a 507).

Power is from a 4.9-liter V8 rated at 395 horsepower. It could hit 60 in 4.2 seconds and was limited to a 155-mph top end. This car retains its factory body-color hardtop and is one of 62 built finished in red over Crema leather. A total of 5,703 Z8s were produced. While they are sought after today, their $128,000 base price when new did not move them off of dealer lots quickly 20 years ago.

That said, good luck picking one up for under $150,000 today. They’ve aged pretty well and are certainly a future classic. Click here for more info on this one, and here for more from Mecum in Monterey.

Dino 246 GTS

1974 Dino 246 GTS

Offered by Silverstone Auctions | Sywell Park, U.K. | June 5, 2021

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

So, technically, Dino was a separate marque from Ferrari. This car does not have any Ferrari badging. Instead, that little yellow rectangle up front says “Dino” – which was the name of Enzo Ferrari‘s son who died in 1956. Three road cars were produced under the Dino marque, including the 206 GT/S, the 246 GT/S, and the 308 GT4. Even still, they are still generally referred to as “Ferrari Dino”s.

The 246 looked very similar to the 206 it replaced when it launched in 1969. It was the first “Ferrari” produced in massive numbers – 3,761 were made between the GT coupe and the GTS targa. Power is from a mid-mounted 2.4-liter V6 rated at 192 horsepower when new (in Europe… U.S.-spec cars had less power).

The GTS was sold between 1971 and 1974, and 1,274 were made. This right-hand-drive example is one of 72 finished from the factory in Nocciola Metallizzato. Two rare, sought-after options included Daytona-style seats (“chairs”) and Group 4-style fender flares (“flares”). This one has the standard seats, but it does have the flares. The pre-sale estimate (or “guide price” in Silverstone-speak) is $530,000-$600,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

DAF 44

1975 DAF 44

Offered by Barons | Sandown Park, U.K. | June 8, 2021

Photo – Barons

DAF still exists as a heavy truck manufacturer, but passenger car production, which started in 1958, wrapped for good in 1976. The 44 was a small family car styled by Giovanni Michelotti. It went on sale in 1966 and lasted through 1974. This one is titled as a ’75, which may have been the year it was first sold.

DAF models were usually technically interesting. This car has a front-engine/rear-wheel-drive layout and is powered by a 844cc flat-twin rated at 34 horsepower. It used DAF’s “Variomatic” transmission, which was essentially the first successful CVT gearbox.

The 44 was replaced by the short-lived 46 in late 1974 after nearly 168,000 had been built. This example is actually quite nice, and it should bring between $1,200-$2,100. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Alfa 155 Touring Car

1996 Alfa Romeo 155 V6 TI ITC

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Milan, Italy | June 15, 2021

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The 155 was Alfa’s cool, boxy sedan in the 1990s. It was actually produced between 1992 and 1998, and Alfa took it racing in the early part of the decade. We’ve featured a homologation prototype of a 155 race-car-for-the-road in the past.

The 155 V6 TI was campaigned in DTM and the International Touring Car Championship between 1993 and 1996. This is a factory race car powered by a 490-horsepower, 2.5-liter V6. It’s also got four-wheel drive and can hit 60 in 2.5 seconds as well as 185 mph on the straights. Just imagine it bouncing over curbing at Europe’s most famous race tracks.

This particular chassis competed in the 1996 International Touring Car Championship with driver Nicola Larini, who won races with it at Mugello and Interlagos. The current owner bought it in 2018 and had it prepped for the DTM Classics Series at an insane cost. So it’s ready to go. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

1947 Kaiser

1947 Kaiser Custom

Offered by Mecum | Tulsa, Oklahoma | June 11-12, 2021

Photo – Mecum

Henry J. Kaiser had many successful businesses before getting into automobiles, including a construction company that built the Hoover Dam along with Kaiser Shipyards, Kaiser Aluminum, and Kaiser Permanente. Kaiser-Frazer Motors’ first year of production was 1947, and two models were offered on the Kaiser side of things: the Special and Custom.

These models were some of the first fresh post-war designs, and the higher-spec Custom retailed for $2,301. It’s powered by a 3.7-liter inline-six rated at 100 horsepower when new. The Custom was much rarer than the Special, with only 5,412 produced (compared to over 65,000 Specials).

This one is said to be largely original. Kaiser ran into financial problems in 1949 and everything declined thereafter, although some of their designs were still quite solid. This launch-year Kaiser looked pretty sharp when it was new (they were styled by Howard “Dutch” Darrin, after all). And they are still pretty interesting. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Koenigsegg CCR

2004 Koenigsegg CCR

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Milan, Italy | June 15, 2021

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Koenigsegg produced three prototypes of its first car, the CC, before entering production with the CC8S in 2002. Two years later they upped the ante with the CCR, which was an evolution of the CC8S with revised braking and suspension systems. Aerodynamic updates, bigger wheels, and engine upgrades were also part of the package, which made the CCR one of the most outrageous supercars of the 2000s.

Built between 2004 and 2006, the CCR is powered by an 806 horsepower, twin-supercharged 4.6-liter V8. It was capable of hitting 60 in about 3.2 seconds on its way to a record-breaking 245 mph.

Only 14 examples were produced, and this is number three. It was the first CCR unveiled to the public and is finished in Lava Orange over a pretty decent-looking interior for a low-volume, upstart supercar manufacturer from 2004. No estimate is available, but it sure won’t be cheap. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Ferrari 512 BB

1979 Ferrari 512 BB

Offered by Silverstone Auctions | Sywell, U.K. | June 5, 2021

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

Ferrari’s Berlinetta Boxer debuted as the 365 GT/4 in 1973. It looked pretty much like this, but it shared its numerical designation with the car it replaced, the 365 GTB/4. It was the first mid-engined Ferrari road car and began the line of flat-12 powered sports cars from the company that would last into the mid-1990s.

The 512 replaced the 365 GT/4 in 1976. It is powered by a carbureted 4.9-liter flat-12 rated at 355 horsepower. It would remain in production until being replaced by the fuel-injected version (the 512 BBi) in 1981. Just 929 carbureted examples were built, which makes it slightly rarer than the injected version.

This car is one of 101 right-hand-drive carbureted models and was restored in 2015. No pre-sale estimate is available, but you can read more about it here and see more from Silverstone Auctions all-Ferrari sale here.

SECMA F16

2009 SECMA F16

Offered by Bonhams | Bicester, U.K. | May 22, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

SECMA (which stands of Societe d’Etude et Construction Mecanique Automobile) is a French microcar manufacturer that was founded in 1995 by Daniel Renard in Lambres, France. Many of their initial models were very small, with some essentially just looking like four-wheeler ATVs with doors.

The F16 was launched in 2009 and is a street-legal buggy-style sports car. Most of these French microcars are powered by like 20-horsepower lawnmower engines. Not this bad boy. It has a rear-mounted 1.6-liter Renault inline-four making 103 horsepower. It also has a five-speed manual gearbox and rear-wheel drive. Decent sporting credentials for a car weighing about 1,200 pounds.

There has since been a re-styled F16 Turbo model introduced. This naturally aspirated F16 actually looks kind of fun. And no one would know what in the world you were driving. It should sell for between $13,000-$17,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $9,315.

Maserati Mexico

1972 Maserati Mexico 4.7

Offered by Silverstone Auctions | Stoneleigh Park, U.K. | May 22, 2021

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

With the Mexico, Maserati entered a new arena: the four-seat coupe. It’s not a 2+2; you can put actual humans back there. The model was launched in 1966 with styling by Vignale, and 485 were built through 1972.

Two differed engine choices were available, and this car has the larger 4.7-liter V8 (there was also a 4.2 offered beginning in 1969). The 4.7 was rated at 290 horsepower and could push the car to 155 mph.

This car is one of six right-hand-drive 4.7-liter examples (of the 175 fitted with that engine in total). It was to be delivered new to Australia, but the order was canceled and it was actually kept in Italy as a RHD car until 2006. It was restored later in the 2000s and is now expected to bring between $123,000-$137,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

1911 Winton Touring

1911 Winton Model 17-B Five-Passenger Touring

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Amelia Island, Florida | May 22, 2021

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Alexander Winton’s company is one of my favorites. Winton was one of America’s first automobile manufacturers, and by the 1910s, they were a producer of some of America’s finest cars. Six-cylinder Wintons arrived in 1908 and became the mainstay of their lineup until the end of the company in 1924.

The Model 17-B was Winton’s sole 1911 offering. It was powered the same 7.5-liter inline-six that stuck around for 1912’s 17-C. Horsepower was rated at 48. Seven body styles were offered from the factory, including this $3,408 five-passenger touring that was delivered new in Pittsburgh.

Restored a while back, this car has been used in historic tours since the 1950s. It’s a pretty grand piece of pre-WWI American automotive art. It should sell for between $200,000-$250,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $318,500.