McLaren M21

1972 McLaren-Cosworth M21

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monaco | May 2024

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The M21 was a Formula Two race car built by McLaren for the 1972 season. Jody Scheckter, who owns this car, won a single race in the M21 in London, but the car largely struggled with technical issues.

The original M21 was wrecked in the 1970s. There were two Formula Atlantic versions of the car in existence, so a couple of guys realized they had enough parts to build three M21 cars in the 1990s. One of which used a spare monocoque and the other two used existing cars, one of which was privately owned and one that was owned by McLaren.

None of them had chassis plates, but McLaren offered up some new ones that identified the cars as M21s. This is one of the three and it was sort of built for Scheckter in the ’90s. It has a Cosworth inline-four and an estimate of $140,000-$215,000. More info can be found here.

Tyrrell 008

1978 Tyrrell-Cosworth 008

Offered by Bonhams | Monaco | May 2024

Photo – Bonhams

The Tyrrell Racing Organisation – one of the great F1 team names – finished fourth in the constructor’s championship in 1978, their 13th season in F1. They used the 008 for the entire season, which was the first season after their famous six-wheeler.

The cars were powered by a 3.0-liter Cosworth DFV V8, which this car retains. The competition history for this chassis, 008/03, includes:

  • 1978 South African Grand Prix – 2nd (with Patrick
  • 1978 Monaco Grand Prix – 1st (with Depailler)
  • 1978 Belgian Grand Prix – 17th, DNF (with Depailler)
  • 1978 Spanish Grand Prix – 20th, DNF (with Depailler)
  • 1978 Swedish Grand Prix – 19th, DNF (with Depailler)
  • 1978 French Grand Prix – 24th, DNF (with Depailler)
  • 1978 British Grand Prix – 4th (with Depailler)
  • 1978 German Grand Prix – 24th, DNF (with Depailler)
  • 1978 Austrian Grand Prix – 2nd (with Depailler)
  • 1978 Dutch Grand Prix – 23rd, DNF (with Depailler)
  • 1978 United States Grand Prix – 22nd, DNF (with Depailler)
  • 1978 Canadian Grand Prix – 5th (with Depailler)

The car was also involved in the start of the race crash at the 1978 Italian Grand Prix. Depailler would move to a back up car for the restart of the race.

It was later used in privateer racing around the U.K. and then became part of Pink Floyd drummer Nick Mason’s collection. It is a Monaco winner and has a pre-sale estimate of $1,170,000-$1,500,000. More info can be found here.

McLaren M23

1973 McLaren-Cosworth M23

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monaco | May 2024

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Turns out former F1 champion Jody Scheckter has quite the collection of old F1 cars, including this, his McLaren M23. The M23 was a helluva car, appearing on the grid in races beginning in 1973 and ending in 1978. Could you imagine someone running a five-year-old F1 chassis in a race today?

This car is chassis M23-2, and it is powered by a Cosworth V8. In period, the 3.0-liter DFV made about 465 horsepower. The competition history for this chassis includes:

  • 1973 Spanish Grand Prix – 4th (with Peter Revson)
  • 1973 Belgian Grand Prix – 16th, DNF (with Revson)
  • 1973 Monaco Grand Prix – 5th (with Revson)
  • 1973 Swedish Grand Prix – 7th (with Revson)
  • 1973 British Grand Prix – 1st (with Revson)
  • 1973 Dutch Grand Prix – 4th (with Revson)
  • 1973 German Grand Prix – 9th (with Revson)
  • 1973 Austrian Grand Prix – 22nd, DNF (with Revson)
  • 1973 Canadian Grand Prix – 22nd, DNF (with Jody Scheckter)
  • 1973 United States Grand Prix – 18th, DNF (with Scheckter)
  • 1974 South African Grand Prix – 19th (with Dave Charlton)
  • 1975 South African Grand Prix – 14th (with Charlton)

It also competed in F5000 and Can-Am races through 1980! It remained part of McLaren’s collection before being traded into Scheckter’s. It now has an estimate of $1,860,000-$2,400,000. More info can be found here.

John Player Special

1978 Lotus-Cosworth Type 79

Offered by Bonhams | Abu Dhabi, UAE | November 25, 2023

Photo – Bonhams

Well, F1 cars don’t come much more famous or significant than this. Bonhams has littered their listing with superlatives and a lot of words, so let’s try to distill it down a bit. The Type 79 was developed in late 1977 and would debut midway through 1978, dominating and being carried over for the 1979 season as well.

The car was advanced for its time, with the aerodynamics taking advantage of “ground effects”, sucking the car to the road in the corners. It’s powered by a 3.0-liter Ford-Cosworth DFV V8 that made about 475 horsepower. The competition history for this chassis, 79/4, includes:

  • 1978 Dutch Grand Prix – 1st (with Mario Andretti)
  • 1978 Italian Grand Prix – 6th (with Andretti)
  • 1978 Canadian Grand Prix – 8th (with Andretti)
  • 1979 Argentine Grand Prix – 5th (with Andretti)
  • 1979 Brazilian Grand Prix – 23rd, DNF (with Andretti)
  • 1979 French Grand Prix – 13th (with Carlos Reutemann)
  • 1979 British Grand Prix – 23rd, DNF (with Andretti)
  • 1979 Austrian Grand Prix – 18th, DNF (with Reutemann)
  • 1979 Dutch Grand Prix – 22nd, DNF (with Reutemann)
  • 1979 Italian Grand Prix – 7th (with Reutemann)

A few other notes. For 1978, the team ran the cars in the John Player Special livery, but the 1979 paint scheme was Martini. This car was also used in Mario Andretti’s 1978 championship season (in which he won the driver’s championship and Lotus the constructor’s).

Lotus kept the car until selling it in 1983. It suffered a big crash in a vintage event in 1989. Later rebuilt, the car changed hands next in 1999, when the current owner bought it. This car has an estimate of $6,500,000-$9,500,000 – the high end of which is short of RM’s low estimate on their modern Mercedes F1 car. Which seems backwards. Click here for more info.

Sierra RS Cosworth

1986 Ford Sierra RS Cosworth

Offered by Silverstone Auctions | Northampton, England | May 20, 2023

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

The Sierra was kind of a remarkable car for Ford of Europe. It was the sort of new-age family car for Europe, much like the Taurus would be in the U.S. But instead of the hotted-up SHO models, Europe got the Cosworth-powered RS.

The Sierra RS debuted at the 1985 Geneva Motor Show and was intended to homologate the Sierra for Group A Touring Car racing. The road cars featured a turbocharged 2.0-liter inline-four that made 201 horsepower. The Cosworth engine was only available in two-door Sierras that had some body tweaks, including that high-mount rear spoiler.

In all 5,545 were sold, including 500 of the RS500 version. This example remained with a French owner for over three decades and has under 50,000 miles. It has an estimate of $70,000-$82,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold.

Rondeau M482

1983 Rondeau-Cosworth M482

Offered by Bonhams | Brussels, Belgium | May 13, 2023

Photo – Bonhams

Jean Rondeau raced at Le Mans a few times before he decided he could do better designing, building, and competing in his own cars. The first Rondeau cars arrived at Le Sarthe in 1976, although they were branded as Inalteras due to their sponsorship with the wallpaper company.

The Rondeau M378 was the first Rondeau-branded car at the race, and the last would be this: the 1983 M482. It had power in-period from a 3.9-liter Cosworth V8. There is currently no engine installed, but a Cosworth DFV V8 accompanies the car. The competition history for this chassis, #003, includes:

  • 1983 24 Hours of Le Mans – 48th, DNF (with Jean-Pierre Jaussaud and Philippe Streiff)
  • 1985 24 Hours of Le Mans – 46th, DNF (with Christian Bussi, Jack Griffin, and Marion L. Speer)

Only three M482s were built. And they did not do well at Le Mans in 1983. So bad, in fact, that Rondeau has to file for bankruptcy, which is how this car ended up in the hands of a privateer in 1985. Successful or not, the car carries a pre-sale estimate of $275,000-$390,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold, though Bonhams is being LAME and not telling anyone how much.

Alain de Cadenet’s Duckhams LM

1972 Duckhams-Ford-Cosworth LM72

Offered by Aguttes | Neuilly, France | April 27, 2023

Photo – Aguttes

This is a car with a great story. Alain de Cadenet was an English racing driver (and later pretty awesome TV presenter if you like old cars). He raced at Le Mans 15 times, including with cars of his own design. In 1971, he ran Le Mans in a Ferrari 512M. The next year he tried to buy a Ferrari 312 PB, which the company refused to sell to a privateer, as it was based on their F1 car and thus too extreme for an “amateur.”

So he thought of something else. De Cadenet owned a Brabham BT33 F1 car himself, a car which he entered in two 1971 F1 races for his friend and endurance racing co-driver, Chris Craft. So he asked Brabham if they could turn it into a full-bodied sports racing prototype. Bernie Ecclestone, who had just bought Brabham, pointed de Cadenet to a young designer named Gordon Murray.

Over the course of six weeks, Murray designed this. But it needed a new engine – so de Cadenet went to McLaren and bought Bruce McLaren‘s 1968 Belgian Grand Prix-winning Cosworth DFV (as one does). Then he convinced lubricant manufacturer Duckhams to sponsor the whole ordeal. And by June, they were on the grid at Le Sarthe. The competition history includes:

  • 1972 24 Hours of Le Mans – 12th (with Alain de Cadenet and Chris Craft)
  • 1973 24 Hours of Le Mans – 45th, DNF (with de Cadenet and Craft)
  • 1974 24 Hours of Le Mans – 26th, DNF (with Craft and John Nicholson)

For the ’73 race the car received longtail bodywork by Murray, and in 1974, with de Cadenet sidelined with an injury and the Duckhams sponsorship deal over, the car raced as a de Cadenet LM72. Which is pretty awesome, even if he didn’t get to drive it.

The car was restored in 2002 to how it competed in 1972, including with a 3.0-liter Cosworth V8. In period, it also competed in Interserie and Can-Am events. More recently, it’s been active at the Le Mans Classic. The estimate now is $1,600,000-$2,750,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold.

Late-1990s Newman/Haas Cars

Late-1990s Newman/Haas Cars

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Lincolnshire, Illinois | October 29, 2022


1996 Lola T96/00

Photo – RM Sotheby’s

We’ve talked about the Newman/Haas sale before (but we may have forgotten to say what a shame it is). Anyway, let’s jump into the cars. This is the era. The black Havoline/Kmart-liveried Michael Andretti cars. The pinnacle of CART.

This car, chassis HU 14, is a Lola T96 (we’ve featured a T95 before). It is currently without an engine, but in period had a Ford-Cosworth V8. The competition history here includes:

  • 1996 Milwaukee Mile – 1st (with Michael Andretti)
  • 1996 Road America – 1st (with Andretti)
  • 1996 Molson Indy Vancouver – 1st (with Andretti)

Michael also used it in five other races that year on his way to second in the championship. It’s being sold without reserve. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $70,000.


1997 Swift 007.i

Photo – RM Sotheby’s

For the 1997 season of the CART PPG World Series (man, remember those TV graphics?), Newman/Haas switched from Lola to Swift as a chassis manufacturer. Swift Engineering is based in Southern California and supplied chassis to Newman/Haas for a few years.

This 007.i would’ve been originally powered by a Ford-Cosworth V8 but is currently sans motor. The team used six examples of the 007.i in the ’97 season, four of which are in this sale at no reserve. Competition history for this one, #005, includes:

  • 1997 Surfers Paradise – 3rd (with Michael Andretti)
  • 1997 Gateway – 11th (with Andretti)
  • 1997 Mid-Ohio – 8th (with Andretti)
  • 1997 Molson Indy Vancouver – 18th (with Andretti)

He also used it in two other races that year. It’s now selling at no reserve. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $53,200.


1998 Swift 009.c

Photo – RM Sotheby’s

Newman/Haas continued with Swift into the 1998 season, which saw drivers Michael Andretti and Christian Fittipaldi doing most of the driving. This chassis, #004, would’ve been originally equipped with a Ford/Cosworth V8, but it is currently just a roller.

This car competed in seven of the season’s 19 races, including:

  • 1998 Rio 400k – 5th (with Michael Andretti)
  • 1998 Michigan – 6th (with Andretti)
  • 1998 Road America – 18th (with Andretti)

It’s selling at no reserve. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $39,200.


2000 Lola B2K/00

Photo – RM Sotheby’s

So I know I said “cars of the late-1990s” but 1. we’ve already featured Newman/Haas’s 1999 entry, the Swift 010.c and 2. 2000 was very much a part of the late 1990s.

The team switched back to Lola chassis for the 2000 season after a few years with Swift. They still employed both Michael Andretti and Christian Fittipaldi this year. Their engine supplier was Ford/Cosworth, with an XF V8. This car has no engine at the moment.

This car, chassis HU 07, competed in 12 of 20 races that year, including:

  • 2000 Homestead-Miami – 7th (with Christian Fittipaldi)
  • 2000 Twin Ring Motegi – 11th (with Fittipaldi)
  • 2000 Mid-Ohio – 3rd (with Fittipaldi)
  • 2000 Fontana – 1st (with Fittipaldi)

You can read more about it here.

Update: Sold $39,200.

The Last Four Champ Car Champions

The Last Four Champ Car Champions

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | ???? | October 29, 2022


2004 Lola-Cosworth-Ford B01/00

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The McDonald’s-liveried Champ Cars of Sebastien Bourdais are some the final iconic cars from that era of American motorsport. Campaigned by Newman/Haas Racing, the cars would clinch four consecutive championships with Bourdais and propel him to Formula 1.

2004 was the first season after they dropped the CART name. Officially, it was called the Bridgestone Presents the Champ Car World Series Powered by Ford. The Lola B02 chassis made up most of the field (the rest were Reynards). Every car was powered by a turbocharged 2.65-liter Ford-Cosworth XFE V8 that could make over 900 horsepower and rev to 15,000 rpm.

This chassis was initially delivered to Newman/Haas in 2001 and used that season. It was then placed into storage before being pulled out and updated for the 2004 season. The competition history for this chassis, 01-14, includes:

  • 2001 Grand Prix of Monterrey – 20th, DNF (with Christian Fittipaldi)
  • 2001 Grand Prix of Portland – 3rd (with Fittipaldi)
  • 2004 Grand Prix of Long Beach – 3rd (with Sebastien Bourdais)
  • 2004 Grand Prix of Monterrey – 1st (with Bourdais)
  • 2004 Grand Prix of Portland – 1st (with Bourdais)
  • 2004 Molson Indy Toronto – 1st (with Bourdais)
  • 2004 Grand Prix of Road America – 1st (with Bourdais)
  • 2004 Las Vegas – 1st (with Bourdais)
  • 2004 Mexico City – 1st (with Bourdais)

Quite the career en route to Bourdais’ first championship. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $168,000.


2005 Lola-Cosworth-Ford B05/00

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Lola B05 was Newman/Haas’ 2005 competitor, although they retained the successful B01 just in case. The 900-horsepower, turbocharged 2.65-liter Ford-Cosworth XFE V8 remained unchanged. This chassis, HU 01, achieved the following:

  • 2005 Milwaukee Mile – 6th (with Sebastien Bourdais)
  • 2005 Portland Grand Prix – 2nd (with Bourdais)
  • 2005 Grand Prix of Cleveland – 5th (with Bourdais)
  • 2005 Grand Prix of San Jose – 1st (with Bourdais)
  • 2005 Grand Prix of Denver – 1st (with Bourdais)
  • 2005 Molson Indy Montreal – 4th (with Bourdais)
  • 2005 Surfers Paradise – 1st (with Bourdais)

Add to that: another championship. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $201,600.


2006 Lola-Ford-Cosworth B02/00

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Lola B02 was actually the company’s 2002 CART chassis, and that’s when Newman/Haas took delivery of this one. It was updated over the years and used through the 2006 season, which is the specification it is in today.

Again, it is powered by a turbocharged 2.65-liter Cosworth V8. The competition history for this chassis, HU 03, includes:

  • 2002 Grand Prix of Monterrey – 3rd (with Christian Fittipaldi)
  • 2002 Molson Indy Toronto – 3rd (with Fittipaldi)
  • 2002 Grand Prix of Mid-Ohio – 2nd (with Fittipaldi)
  • 2002 Grand Prix Americas – 2nd (with Fittipaldi)
  • 2003 EuroSpeedway Lausitz – 1st (with Sebastian Bourdais)
  • 2003 Cleveland Grand Prix – 3rd (with Bruno Junqueira)
  • 2003 Molson Indy Toronto – 3rd (with Junqueira)
  • 2003 Grand Prix of Denver – 1st (with Junqueira)
  • 2004 Long Beach Grand Prix – 2nd (with Junqueira)
  • 2004 Grand Prix of Denver – 3rd (with Junqueira)
  • 2004 Molson Indy Montreal – 1st (with Junqueira)
  • 2004 Grand Prix of Monterey – 2nd (with Junqueira)
  • 2004 Surfers Paradise – 1st (with Junqueira)
  • 2006 Milwaukee Mile – 1st (with Bourdais)
  • 2006 Grand Prix of Toronto – 3rd (with Bourdais)
  • 2006 Grand Prix of Montreal – 1st (with Bourdais)
  • 2006 Grand Prix of Road America – 3rd (with Bourdais)
  • 2006 Mexico City – 1st (with Bourdais)

Bourdais scooped up the championship in 2006, making it three in a row. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $196,000.


2007 Panoz-Cosworth DP01

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

2007 was the final season of the Champ Car World Series. They had just one constructor: Panoz with their DP01, all of which were powered by a turbocharged 2.65-liter Cosworth V8. Output was up to 950 horsepower.

I think it’s safe to say Bourdais was a championship favorite going into the season. He piloted this chassis in 10 races during the year, including:

  • 2007 Vegas Grand Prix – 13th (with Bourdais)
  • 2007 Grand Prix of Long Beach – 1st (with Bourdais)
  • 2007 Grand Prix of Houston – 1st (with Bourdais)
  • 2007 Grand Prix of Portland – 1st (with Bourdais)
  • 2007 Toronto Grand Prix – 9th (with Bourdais)
  • 2007 San Jose Grand Prix – 5th (with Bourdais)
  • 2007 Belgian Grand Prix – 1st (with Bourdais)
  • 2007 Bavarian Grand Prix – 7th (with Bourdais)
  • 2007 Surfers Paradise – 1st (with Bourdais)
  • 2007 Mexico City – 1st (with Bourdais)

He was pretty dominant in this chassis, and really, throughout his entire Champ Car career. He would win the final Champ Car championship in 2007. You can read more about it here.

Update: Sold $235,200.

Sierra Cosworth RS500

1988 Ford Sierra Cosworth RS500

Offered by Silverstone Auctions | Sywell, U.K. | May 28, 2022

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

The Ford Sierra was a European family car sold between 1982 and 1993. For a brief time, the two-door variant was sold in the U.S. as the Merkur XR4Ti. A high-performance version, offered as a hatchback in 1986 and 1987 and as a sedan from 1988-1992, was also sold. It was called the Sierra RS Cosworth.

In 1987, some people at Ford thought about homologating the car for touring car racing, which required 500 “evolution” models. So Ford roped in Aston Martin Tickford to help convert the cars to “RS500” spec. Changes included a larger turbocharger for the 2.0-liter inline-four, which now was good for 224 horsepower. The front end was reworked to aid cooling, and a second spoiler was added beneath the rear wing.

This car has less than 36,000 miles, and a pre-sale estimate has not yet been published. You can read more about it here.

Update: Sold, but Silverstone won’t tell us for how much. Lame. Gotta love that transparency.