Ferrari 500 TRC

1957 Ferrari 500 TRC Spider by Scaglietti

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monterey, California | August 19-20, 2022

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Ferrari Monza was a series of sports racing cars from the early 1950s. Unlike the V12 Testa Rossas, the Monzas were powered by Lampredi four-cylinder engines. The Monzas started with 1953’s 625 TF and included the 500 Mondial and 750 Monza.

In 1956, Ferrari entered the 500 TR, which replaced the Mondial, in World Sportscar Championship races. The following year, that car was upgraded to be the 500 TRC, which was powered by an upgraded 2.0-liter inline-four good for 190 horsepower and 153 mph.

Only 19 examples were built, with this (0706 MDTR) one being #18. Its competition history includes:

  • 1957 24 Hours of Le Mans – 29th, DNF (with Francois Picard and Richie Ginther)
  • 1958 12 Hours of Sebring – 44th, DNF (with Gaston Andrey, Bill Lloyd, and Dan Gurney)

Later, the car was powered by a 289 Ford V8 before being reunited with its factory engine. No pre-sale estimate is provided, but you can read more about it here.

365 GT4 BB

1974 Ferrari 365 GT4 BB

Offered by Silverstone Auctions | Sywell Aerodrome, U.K. | June 4, 2022

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

“Berlinetta Boxer” describes a series of Ferrari near-supercars produced from the early 1970s through the early 1980s. It was the first mid-engined Ferrari-branded road car, and it used a why-the-hell-not flat-12 engine. There were essentially three models over the run: the famed and loved 512 BB, its injected twin the 512 BBi, and this, the sort of odd duck 365 GT4.

The 365 GT4 was the first of the series and was replacement for the 365 GTB/4 Daytona. Manufactured from 1973 through 1976, it is the rarest of the BBs, with just 387 examples produced. Power is provided by a 4.4-liter flat-12 that made 375 horsepower. The engine would get bigger for the 512 – though less powerful.

This car is one of 88 right-hand-drive examples, and it has a replacement drivetrain. The pre-sale estimate is $215,000-$285,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold.

F430 Scuderia Spider 16M

2009 Ferrari Scuderia Spider 16M

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monaco | May 14, 2022

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Ferrari’s F430 was the follow up to the relatively similar looking 360 Modena. Like the Modena before it, the F430 got some spicy special editions as production neared its end. The F430 was offered from 2005 through 2009, and it got a Spider variant during that span. Later came the 430 Scuderia, which was a track-focused special that for some reason lost the “F” prefix.

Then, for the final model year, Ferrari dropped the entire “F430” name for the model’s last hurrah: the limited-edition Scuderia Spider 16M, the latter part of the name in celebration of Ferrari’s 16th Formula One constructor’s title, which they won in 2008. Think of it sort of like a drop-top version of the track-ready Scuderia.

The 4.3-liter V8 puts out 503 horsepower, and the car got a lot of lightness added by way of carbon-fiber bits. It could do some serious hairdo rearranging at its 196-mph top end. Only 499 were built, and they look better in black than red. You can read more about this one here.

Update: Not sold.

LaFerrari Prototype

2012 Ferrari LaFerrari M6 Development Prototype

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monaco | May 14, 2022

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The LaFerrari was one of the three major hybrid hypercars to debut in the 2010s along with the McLaren P1 and Porsche 918 Spyder. But each of those cars underwent heavy development cycles, and not all of them were pretty.

What we have here is a “LaFerrari Prototype” that is actually a heavily modified Ferrari 458 Italia that gave its dignity to be fitted with a bunch of test equipment and essentially operate as a development mule. This car was from the first phase of testing and was codenamed the M6.

It has a version of the LaFerrari’s hybrid powertrain stuffed in its modified chassis. It sounds as if it has a version of the Enzo’s 6.0-liter V12 paired with an F1-derived KERS system and an electric motor. Ferrari sold this car, complete with its factory camouflage, to a private owner in 2016.

It’s a runner, but can’t be registered (or apparently used on public race tracks). But for someone with a private Ferrari collection (or a private race track), the purchase could make sense. No pre-sale estimate is available, and you can read more here.

Update: Not sold.

550 GTC

2003 Ferrari 550 GTC

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Paris, France | February 2, 2022

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Ferrari turning their road-going cars into competitive race cars had kind of been a rare event since… well, the 1960s. Sure, they had “Challenge” race cars where 348s and F355s would compete against each other, but it’s not like they were taking them to Le Mans.

That sort of changed with the 550 Maranello. While Ferrari themselves weren’t outright building racing versions of the 550, some privateer teams were. The cars appeared in a few different classes/forms across a variety of series worldwide. We’ve already featured an ex-Le Mans GTLM version, and this is a GTC. The GTCs were “factory-built” in that Ferrari actually partnered with N-Technology to build two cars, both of which were constructed in 2003, after 550 Maranello road car production ceased. The other example is still owned by Ferrari.

Power is provided by a 5.5-liter V12. The competition history for this chassis included:

  • 2003 24 Hours of Spa – 27th, DNF (with Philipp Peter, Fabio Babini, and Boris Derichebourgh)

The following year it won the Italian Speed Hill Climb championship in the GTM category. The engine was rebuilt in 2016, and the current owner bought it the next year. It’s been restored to its Spa livery and now carries a pre-sale estimate of $2,300,000-$2,850,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Ferrari Meera

1983 Ferrari Meera S by Michelotti

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Paris, France | February 2, 2022

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Ferrari’s 1970s/80s 2+2 line consisted of the 365 GT4 2+2, the 400, and the 412. They all looked pretty much the same but gradually evolved between 1972 and 1989. If you look closely, you can tell that this one-off car, built for a member of the Saudi royal family, started out as a 1983 400i.

The car was re-styled by Giovanni Michelotti, and it was the last Ferrari he ever worked on. Power is from a fuel-injected 4.8-liter V12 rated at 306 horsepower when new. Top speed was 149 mph. Just 883 automatic-transmission 400is were built. But this is the only one styled like this.

It underwent a quarter-of-a-million Euro restoration by Ferrari Classiche in 2010 and is now offered via RM’s Paris sale out of Dubai. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $489,434.

Ferrari F60 America

2016 Ferrari F60 America

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monterey, California | August 12-14, 2021

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Going back 20 years, Ferrari has created limited-edition drop-top models of its front-engined V12 grand tourers. It started with the 550 Barchetta and progressed through the 575 Superamerica, 599 SA Aperta, and this, the F60 America.

It’s based upon the F12berlinetta, which went on sale in 2012. The F60 was introduced in late 2014 and was out of production by the end of F12 production in 2017. Only 10 examples were produced to pay homage to the 10 units of the US-only NART Spyder. The name F60 was chosen to celebrate 60 years of Ferrari in America. All 10 were sold before Ferrari even introduced it.

Power is from a 6.3-liter V12 rated at 730 horsepower. The F60 features a fabric soft top and a three-piece carbon-fiber hardtop, depending on what look you are going for. I’m sure this car was insanely expensive when new, and it’s likely still an easy seven-figure car today. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $3,635,000.

Ferrari 512 BB LM

1981 Ferrari 512 BB LM

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monterey, California | August 13-14, 2021

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Ferrari has had historical success with prototype racing cars (though none in a while), but their success with taking their road cars and turning them into race cars has been pretty spotty. Sure, the 550/575 had GT racing versions, and they’ve been a little more serious since the 458, but nothing really mind-blowing. Or that famous. Well, until you get back to this car.

Ferrari’s 512 BB went on sale in 1976, and the fuel-injected 512 BBi replaced it in 1981. Luigi Chinetti (the famed American Ferrari importer and founder of NART, the North American Racing Team), had been running home-grown 365 GT/4 BB-based race cars in the late 1970s. When they finally ran out of steam, Chinetti convinced Ferrari to develop a racing variant of the 512. Ferrari built four Series 1 cars in 1978. In 1980, they introduced the Series 3 512 BB LM. Sixteen examples were built, and this is number 10.

Ferrari didn’t run the cars themselves but sold them to various independent racing teams to operate. The S3 LM was powered by a 5.0-liter flat-12 making 480 horsepower. This car was the last Ferrari sold to or raced by Chinetti’s team, and its competition history includes:

  • 1981 24 Hours of Le Mans – 23rd, DNF (with Alain Cudini, Philippe Gurdjian, and John Morton)
  • 1982 24 Hours of Le Mans – 9th (with Cudini, Morton, and John Paul Jr.)

It was supposed to appear at Le Mans in 1983, but the team folded before that could happen. Instead, the car bounced between a series of collections and has been active in historic racing. No pre-sale estimate is yet available, but you can read more about it here and see more from this sale here.

Update: Not sold.

250 GT Ellena

1958 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe Ellena

Offered by Bonhams | Chichester, U.K. | July 9, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

Ferrari’s 250 GT line of cars spawned many sub-models, beginning with 1954’s GT Europa. In 1955, Ferrari introduced the 250 GT Coupe, which could initially be had as a Boano or Ellena variant. The cars were named after their respective coachbuilders, even though both were from the same family. Felice Mario Boano’s namesake company was only around from 1954 through 1957, at which time he renamed the company Carrozzeria Ellena after his son-in-law, who took over the business that would last through 1966.

The two coupes are distinct from each other, but both share the same 3.0-liter Colombo V12 good for 237 horsepower. Only 50 examples of the 250 GT Ellena were built between 1957 and 1958. This one, like others, features a wonderful two-tone paint scheme with a maroon lower body and a silver roof.

This car, #25, was first registered in Rome and made its way to the U.S. in the 1970s. It spent over two decades in a private New York collection and was restored in the U.K. in 2005. It now carries an estimate of $970,000-$1,200,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $707,269.

Ferrari 250 GT Lusso

1963 Ferrari 250 GT/L Lusso

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Milan, Italy | June 15, 2021

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

I’ve been wanting to feature one of these for years, but I’ve been holding out for the perfect color. I’m still looking for that last bit, but I thought it was time, regardless. Silver looks good here. At least it’s not red. The 250 GT/L (or Lusso, for “luxury”) was the last hurrah for Ferrari’s 250 line, which dated back to 1952. The Lusso was sold between 1962 and 1964.

The body is by Scaglietti, and it’s aggressive, beautiful, and really just the best classic Ferrari shape. It’s the best “classic” Ferrari coupe there is, period. Power is from a 3.0-liter Colombo V12 making approximately 240 horsepower. Top speed was 150 mph.

This is the 65th of 350 produced, and it’s got Ferrari Classiche certification. The restoration was completed 11 years ago. I was once walking through London near Lord’s Cricket Ground and I heard a distant rumble. I stopped. I turned. And a marron Lusso buzzed past. It was amazing. These are incredible cars, and the price reflects it: the estimate here is $1,985,000-$2,550,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.