Ferrari 250 GT Lusso

1963 Ferrari 250 GT/L Lusso

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Milan, Italy | June 15, 2021

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

I’ve been wanting to feature one of these for years, but I’ve been holding out for the perfect color. I’m still looking for that last bit, but I thought it was time, regardless. Silver looks good here. At least it’s not red. The 250 GT/L (or Lusso, for “luxury”) was the last hurrah for Ferrari’s 250 line, which dated back to 1952. The Lusso was sold between 1962 and 1964.

The body is by Scaglietti, and it’s aggressive, beautiful, and really just the best classic Ferrari shape. It’s the best “classic” Ferrari coupe there is, period. Power is from a 3.0-liter Colombo V12 making approximately 240 horsepower. Top speed was 150 mph.

This is the 65th of 350 produced, and it’s got Ferrari Classiche certification. The restoration was completed 11 years ago. I was once walking through London near Lord’s Cricket Ground and I heard a distant rumble. I stopped. I turned. And a marron Lusso buzzed past. It was amazing. These are incredible cars, and the price reflects it: the estimate here is $1,985,000-$2,550,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Dino 246 GTS

1974 Dino 246 GTS

Offered by Silverstone Auctions | Sywell Park, U.K. | June 5, 2021

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

So, technically, Dino was a separate marque from Ferrari. This car does not have any Ferrari badging. Instead, that little yellow rectangle up front says “Dino” – which was the name of Enzo Ferrari‘s son who died in 1956. Three road cars were produced under the Dino marque, including the 206 GT/S, the 246 GT/S, and the 308 GT4. Even still, they are still generally referred to as “Ferrari Dino”s.

The 246 looked very similar to the 206 it replaced when it launched in 1969. It was the first “Ferrari” produced in massive numbers – 3,761 were made between the GT coupe and the GTS targa. Power is from a mid-mounted 2.4-liter V6 rated at 192 horsepower when new (in Europe… U.S.-spec cars had less power).

The GTS was sold between 1971 and 1974, and 1,274 were made. This right-hand-drive example is one of 72 finished from the factory in Nocciola Metallizzato. Two rare, sought-after options included Daytona-style seats (“chairs”) and Group 4-style fender flares (“flares”). This one has the standard seats, but it does have the flares. The pre-sale estimate (or “guide price” in Silverstone-speak) is $530,000-$600,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Ferrari 512 BB

1979 Ferrari 512 BB

Offered by Silverstone Auctions | Sywell, U.K. | June 5, 2021

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

Ferrari’s Berlinetta Boxer debuted as the 365 GT/4 in 1973. It looked pretty much like this, but it shared its numerical designation with the car it replaced, the 365 GTB/4. It was the first mid-engined Ferrari road car and began the line of flat-12 powered sports cars from the company that would last into the mid-1990s.

The 512 replaced the 365 GT/4 in 1976. It is powered by a carbureted 4.9-liter flat-12 rated at 355 horsepower. It would remain in production until being replaced by the fuel-injected version (the 512 BBi) in 1981. Just 929 carbureted examples were built, which makes it slightly rarer than the injected version.

This car is one of 101 right-hand-drive carbureted models and was restored in 2015. No pre-sale estimate is available, but you can read more about it here and see more from Silverstone Auctions all-Ferrari sale here.

Ferrari 550 GTLM

1997 Ferrari 550 Maranello GTLM

Offered by Bonhams | Monaco | April 23, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

Ferrari’s 550 Maranello was a front-engine V12-powered grand tourer. And its design has aged very well. These were pretty hot cars in the late 1990s. But Ferrari never took them racing. Not officially anyway.

That didn’t stop some privateer teams from seeing promise from the quick car. This car was built by a French team called Red Racing, with Ferrari’s approval. It was the first 550 race car built and was campaigned from 1999-2002 in the Spanish and French GT championships along with some races in Italy. It was purchased by XL Racing in 2003 and modified to ACO LMGT specifications. Its competition history includes:

  • 2003 24 Hours of Le Mans – 34th, DNF (with Ange Barde, Michel Ferte, Gael Lasoudier)
  • 2004 24 Hours of Le Mans – Did not arrive

So it has Le Mans history, which is pretty cool. It’s had two owners since and retains a 600-horsepower, 5.5-liter V12. The estimate is $590,000-$830,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold for a shady and undisclosed amount.

599 GTZ Zagato

2009 Ferrari 599 GTZ Nibbio Spyder Zagato

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Paris, France | February 13, 2021

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The 599 GTB Fiorano was Ferrari’s front-engine V12 grand tourer between 2007 and 2012. It spawned a few notable factory variants, including the HGTE (which was more of an add-on package), the XX (which was a track car), and the GTO (which was a road version of the XX). There was also the limited-edition drop-top, the SA Aperta.

Zagato, which had done similar things to the 599’s predecessors, the 575 and the 550, decided to do a limited run of modified 599s, dubbed the GTZ Nibbio (there were both coupes and spyders). Basically, they took a 599 GTB and re-sculpted the body to include their current weird design language, which consists of a rounded tail and two bulbous pointy bits on either side of the front grille. In this case, they also chopped off the roof.

The 6.0-liter V12 remains unchanged and is still rated at 612 horsepower. Only nine Nibbios were made, six of which were convertibles. Somehow this car was completed in 2020 and retains Zagato’s prototype serial number. You can read more about this car here and see more from RM here.

Update: Not sold.

Ferrari Daytona

1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona

Offered by Mecum | Kissimmee, Florida | January 15, 2021

Photo – Mecum

Here’s another “blue chip” collector car. The Ferrari Daytona is one of the last “classic” Ferraris, in my opinion. Before things got all boxy. The 365 GTB/4 was styled by Leonardo Fioravanti at Pininfarina – not really a household name, which is a shame because this car is gorgeous.

Ferrari built 1,383 Daytona coupes between 1968 and 1973, and they also made just 122 Spyders, or “GTS/4”s. Power is from a 347-horsepower, 4.4-liter V12. Top speed is 174 mph. This car has six Weber carburetors, a limited-slip differential, Borrani wire wheels, Ansa exhaust, and air conditioning.

The Daytona Spyder is a million-dollar car every day of the week. The Berlinetta version has been creeping up over the years, and this one is estimated between $650,000-$700,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $500,000.

612 Scaglietti Shooting Brake

2005 Ferrari 612 Scaglietti Shooting Brake

Offered by Bonhams | Knokke-Heist, Belgium | October 11, 2020

Photo – Bonhams

There has been a long history of Ferrari owners turning their racy Italian thoroughbreds into something a little more… functional, and the converted shooting brake has always been a popular choice. Of course, when Ferrari introduced their own factory version (the FF), people were like “meh.”

The 612 Scaglietti was styled originally by Ken Okuyama at Pininfarina, and I think it has aged very well. This example was sent to Vandenbrink Design in the Netherlands in 2017 where it was converted into a shooting brake with a cool pair of windows over the heads of the rear-seat passengers. I like it.

Power is from a 533 horsepower, 5.7-liter V12, which makes this quite the grocery getter. It should sell for between $180,000-$300,000. That’s quite the range. So in other words, Bonhams has no idea what this will bring. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $243,038.

August 2020 Auction Highlights

We start near the end of August with Shannons where the Australia-only Statesman sold for $21,486. The top sale was this 1972 Porsche 911E coupe that brought $224,695… which seems like a lot. More results are available here.

Photo – Shannons

Mecum had a sort of Kissimmee bonus sale trying to make up for a bunch of canceled events (hey, you can do anything you want in Florida, pandemic or not). This 2018 Ford GT topped the charts at $935,000.

Photo – Mecum

The Nash Statesman (another Statesman, really?) we featured brought $19,800. Click here for complete results.

Finally, for August, was Dorotheum’s sale in Austria. The top sale here was this 1973 Dino 246 GTS for $521,053. We wrote up a few cars from this one, and the Austro-Adler led the way at $149,515.

Photo – Dorotheum

The Glas 1300 Cabriolet sold for $81,747, and the early BMW brought $23,843. The Tatra went for $20,436, and the Steyr-Fiat brought up the rear at $8,174. Click here for more results.

Another sale, this one in early September, that we featured quite a few lots from was RM’s Auburn sale. Three of those cars were among the top four highest sales: the Duesenberg ($632,500), the Kurtis 500B ($550,000), and the Epperly-Offy ($407,000), but the biggest money was reserved for this 1935 Auburn Eight Supercharged Speedster. It brought $770,000.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The other Kurtis, the 500E, sold for $68,200, and the Murena GT went for $41,250, which, for its rarity, seems like a helluva deal. It was actually consigned to their Palm Beach sale, but the entire collection it came from got shifted to this sale instead.

$18,150 would’ve brought home a fairly original Franklin Airman sedan, while a check for $17,600 ended up being good enough for a 1922 Studebaker. The fact that I could’ve had this Chalmers for $10,725 is upsetting. The Moskvitch brought $5,225, and the CitiCar $2,200. Click here for final results.

To wrap up this rundown, we head down the street to Worldwide Auctioneers’ Auburn sale. The only car we featured from this one was the Faraday Future prototype, which appears to have been withdrawn. Womp womp. You can look at more from this sale here.

458 Speciale

2014 Ferrari 458 Speciale

Offered by Bonhams | Cheserex, Switzerland | September 20, 2020

Photo – Bonhams

I remember when the 458 Italia launched, and I remember seeing one shortly thereafter at a gas station near Cannes where some girl got out of the passenger side. She slammed the door into a concrete pillar, and the driver just laughed. A different world.

Somehow, Ferrari is already two generations down the road from the 458. The 488 GTB and the F8 Tributo are both fairly derivative of this design, as the F430 was to the 360, and the F355 was to the 348 back in the ’90s. In that regard, the 458 has aged kind of well. It’s not as garish as the later cars. And as all of the models just listed have done, the 458 was littered with special editions, including the 2013-2015 Speciale, which was akin to the F430 Scuderia or the 360 Challenge Stradale.

Differences from the base car include forged wheels, a larger rear spoiler, finned side sills, and re-designed bumpers. The 4.5-liter V8 also got a power bump to 597 horsepower. This example is essentially brand new and is registered in Switzerland. This Bonhams sale has become a supercar highlights sale, but there are no “confiscated dictator” collections this year (sad face). This is like “supercar-lite” when compared to the three Veyrons already announced. The price for this Blu Mirabeau car is estimated at $440,000-$550,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

August 2020 Auction Highlights

The auction world started picking up steam in August, with most houses turning to online or partial-in-person sales. First up is Silverstone Auctions, where this 1972 Lamborghini Miura SV sold for $2,503,366.

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

The one-off RA4 Vanguard failed to sell, but the Zenos brought $26,506 and the Benova $41,231. More results are available here.

Next up is Gooding & Company, a sale from which we featured two cars. Both sold. The Duesenberg brought $1,012,000, and the VLF sold for an undisclosed amount, WHICH IS LAME. You should assume they paid $15,000 for it, and then refuse to buy it from (presumably) whoever is about to try and flip it for an insane profit (based off of that $15,000 number). The top sale was this 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB Long Nose for $3,080,000. Go here for more results.

Photo – Gooding & Company

Bonhams’ “Quail” sale was held in Los Angeles this year. The cars with the four largest estimates all failed to sell (including the Offener Tourenwagen), leaving this 1959 Porsche 718 RSK Spyder atop the heap at $2,232,500.

Photo – Bonhams

The Grid-Porsche didn’t seller either. The Adams Probe sold for $184,800, and the Mason Tourist King brought $201,600, which seems strong. Check out the other cars that sold here.

RM’s Monterey sale also shifted to the internet (they called it “Shift/Monterey”). The top sale was a 2001 Ferrari 550 GT1 Prodrive for $4,290,000.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

To start, a BMW M1 Procar we featured a while back sold here for $913,000. The Duesenberg from this sale sold for $781,000, and the Fiat Wonderful Coupe brought $181,500. All of our feature cars actually sold, which I guess means they were well-selected. The Ferrari 365 GT 2+2 sold for $176,000, the Edwards America convertible $148,500, and I’m pretty sure a previously-featured Fiat 1100 Allemano cabriolet sold for $158,000. Complete results are available here.

H&H had another online sale this month, and two of the cars we featured from last month failed to sell again (see: Willys-Knight and Renault). The good news is that the Hupmobile found a new home for $32,396. The top sale was actually this 2007 Jaguar XKR (with crazy low mileage) for $36,814. More results can be found here.

Photo – H&H Auctioneers

Finally, the FAM cabriolet prototype was withdrawn from the otherwise all-motorcycle Bonhams auction.