Fiat 500 Beach Car

1958 Fiat 500 Spiaggina by Boano

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Paris, France | February 2024

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

This beach car was bodied by Boano on a (presumably modified) Fiat 500 platform. It is one of two such like it built and the only known survivor. As it is low production, it is of course claimed to be the inspiration for every similar beach car and Jolly that followed. Seemingly every coachbuilt beach car (or similar) auction catalog listing makes this same claim.

Many of these are based on the larger Fiat 600 or 850 platforms, so it’s unusual to see one that started out as a 500 (even though the front end looks much more like an 850). It appears to have been stretched to fit that somewhat-comfortable looking upholstered rear sofa. More comfortable than the wicker up front anyway.

This doorless wonder was originally built for Mr. Fiat: Gianni Agnelli for use at his French villa. The other example went to Aristotle Onassis. 500s were powered by inline twins, but it’s unclear which version this has. It’s neat and apparently unrestored. The estimate is $295,000-$315,000. More info can be found here.

Fiat 850 Beach Car

1969 Fiat 850 Spiaggetta by Michelotti

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Coral Gables, Florida | March 2024

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Italians would’ve built a beach car out of anything in the 1960s. What started out as 500/600-based Jollys evolved into all manner of open cars based on the 600 and, apparently, its successor, the Fiat 850.

Rear-engined, the 850 was available as a two-door coupe and, perhaps more famously, the Spider. The 850 was offered with three different inline-fours ranging from 817 to 903cc. It is unclear what this one has.

But what it does have is looks. Styled by Giovanni Michelotti, the Spiaggetta, which was also known as the Shellette, was a limited-run beach car. It was a step up from a Jolly in that it doesn’t have a wicker interior. Just 80 were built, and RM says it’s good for use as yacht tender. They also say it’s worth $50,000-$60,000. More info can be found here.

Neckar St. Trop

1965 Neckar St. Trop Coupe

Offered by Aguttes | Paris, France | November 26, 2023

Photo – Aguttes

NSU sold Fiats under license beginning in 1929 under the NSU-Fiat marque. NSU sold the Heilbronn, Germany-based factory to Fiat in 1932, and in 1957, then name Neckar replaced NSU-Fiat as the marque until it ceased existing in 1971.

All Neckars were just re-badged versions of something else, in this case the already-obscure OSI 1200, which was a Michelotti-styled variant of the Fiat 1200 Spider. It’s got a Fiat 1.2-liter inline-four.

Aguttes says 280 convertibles and 70 coupes were built, all of which apparently by OSI and then branded differently for various markets. The pre-sale estimate is $27,000-$38,000. Click here for more info.

Monterosa-Bodied Fiat 600

1958 Fiat 600 Coupe by Monterosa

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | St. Moritz, Switzerland | September 15, 2023

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Fiat 600 was a small city car and was slightly larger than the classic Fiat 500, which actually came a little later. But it was also the basis for a number of coachbuilt specials and limited-run cars, including this, which is one of three like it.

Carrozzeria Monterosa was based in Turin and supplied special bodies for chassis from a number of mostly Italian manufacturers, including Maserati, Fiat, and Lancia. They were never a major player, but their designs fit in the time.

This 600 is powered by the standard inline-four and features a more conventional-looking berlinetta body than the stock rounded rear profile of the 600. It also has a very late-50s two-tone color scheme. This photo barely shows it, but the rear glass is the highlight here. Just hope you never have to replace it. The estimate is $56,000-$67,000. Click here for more info.

Fiat 600 Jungla

1966 Fiat 600 Jungla

Offered by Artcurial | Le Mans, France | June 20, 2023

Photo – Artcurial

The standard Fiat 600 looked nothing like this. It looked like a Fiat 500. And the Multipla version looked like a minivan microcar. This Jeep-like thing used bits from the standard 600 and Multipla, but it isn’t just a re-bodied 600.

The Jungla was conceived as an Italian military Jeep that could be dropped out of cargo aircraft. Most of the running gear was lifted from the 600, including the 633cc inline-four. It was repainted red at some point in the past was was put into a collection in 2019.

Only about 600 examples of the Jungla were produced, and they remain fairly uncommon. This one has an estimate of $21,000-$32,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Withdrawn.

Fiat 501

1920 Fiat 501 Tourer

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Cernobbio, Italy | May 20, 2023

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Fiat was founded by a whole bunch of Italian dudes in 1899. Their first 24 cars rolled out in 1900. By the 1920s, their range had expanded significantly, and the 501 would be their “small car” for the immediate post-WWI era.

The 501 was sold from 1919 through 1926, with about 47,000 produced. Available body styles included a four-door sedan and cabriolets with either two or four doors. Power is provided by a 1.5-liter inline-four rated at 23 horsepower. Both S and SS trims brought power increases, but this is the base model.

Basic transportation for Italy at the time it was built, this tourer has been re-done in the past but is described as a “candidate for a comprehensive restoration.” It has a pre-sale estimate of $11,000-$16,500. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $18,287.

Fiat 1400 Rondine Coupe

1952 Fiat 1400 Rondine Coupe by Stabilimento Monviso

Offered by Gooding & Company | Amelia Island, Florida | March 2-3, 2023

Photo – Gooding & Company

The 1400 was Fiat‘s first all-new post-war model when it went on sale in 1950. It would be produced through 1958, while the similar 1900 model was sold from 1952 through 1959. The 1400 was marketed by the factory as a four-door sedan.

There were some coachbuilt versions of the 1400, however, including this stylish coupe. It was bodied by a small Turin-based coachbuilder called Stabilimento Monviso, who would be acquired by Ghia in 1955. Styling was actually by Giovanni Michelotti, and a small number of these “Rondine” coupes were built between 1950 and 1953.

It has suicide doors and two-tone paint. Power is from a 1.4-liter inline-four that was rated at 44 horsepower with a single Weber carburetor. The pre-sale estimate is $150,000-$200,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $89,600.

Fiat 600D Vignale

1963 Fiat 600D Coupe by Vignale

Offered by Aste Bolaffi | Online | January 2023

Photo – Aste Bolaffi

Imagine a bunch of coachbuilt Chevrolet Cruzes running around. Only in Italy would a small city car spawn various different coachbuilt examples. The Fiat 600 was produced (in its Italian run) from 1955 through 1969.

The standard body style was a two-door sedan. It was built under license in other countries, and even as a small MPV called the Multipla. The 600D went on sale in 1962 and featured a 767cc inline-twin that made 32 horsepower.

This Vignale-bodied coupe looks nothing like a standard 600D, but it does retain the rear-engine, rear-wheel-drive layout. It’s covered less than 600 miles since being restored. It is unclear how many Vignale coupes like this were built, but Vignale did build other styles on the 600 platform. The estimate here is $17,000-$21,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold.

Fiat 1100 Cabriolet

1950 Fiat 1100 Cabriolet by Stabilimenti Farina

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Fort Lauderdale, Florida | March 25-26, 2022

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Fiat’s 1100 was primarily known as a tiny family sedan (or wagon) that was produced from 1953 through the end of the 1960s. Before that there was another, different 1100. That model offered in a variety of body styles between 1937 and 1953. The car you see here was from the tail end of the earlier model.

This cabriolet we have here is one of more than a few coachbuilt examples and was bodied by Stabilimenti Farina, which was related to Pinin Farina in that it was founded by Battista’s uncle and employed him before he left to launch his own company. The Stabilimenti closed in 1953.

The 1100 was powered by a 1.1-liter inline-four rated at 35 horsepower. It may not look super flashy or ahead-of-its-time, but this was a classy car in Italy in 1950. And it’ll probably get you into quite a few fancy shows today. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold.

Puch 500

1966 Puch 500 D

Offered by Dorotheum | Salzburg, Austria | October 16, 2021

Photo – Dorotheum

The Puch brand existed under the SteyrDaimler-Puch corporate umbrella and was primarily known for building motorcylces and scooters, in addition to military vehicles. There were cars, too, but for most of the time the company used its resources to build cars for other manufacturers. Occasionally, the company thought “hey, we could build this for us, too.”

And that’s what we have here. The Puch 500 is, quite obviously, a Fiat 500 built under license in Austria. It’s badged as a Puch, and they had their own range of models different than those produced by Fiat. For instance, this is a “D”, which were built between 1959 and 1967. It’s actually been tarted up to look like a 650 TR II, which was a sport model.

The 650 TR II was powered by a 40-horsepower, 660cc inline-twin. This car has just such an engine. It was built to this spec in the 2000s, with it being registered as a 650 TR II in 2011. The pre-sale estimate is $33,000-$44,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $41,404.