Sizaire-Naudin Speedster

1908 Sizaire-Naudin Model C Speedster

Offered by Gooding & Company | April 2024

Photo – Gooding & Company

Sizaire-Naudin was founded by the Sizaire brothers (Georges and Maurice) and Louis Naudin. The company existed between 1903 and 1921, and despite that range, this is just the second vehicle from them we’ve featured. Both are from 1908.

Between 1906 and 1909, the company was active in racing, thus this 1908 model wearing sporty speedster coachwork. It’s powered by a single-cylinder engine, and all early Sizaires feature an independent sliding-pillar front suspension with big transverse leaf springs hanging out in from of the radiator.

This car has been on display at the Mullin museum for some time and will require reconditioning. It has an estimate of $20,000-$30,000. Click here for more info.

Morgan-Monotrace Torpedo

1926 Morgan-Monotrace TMX Torpedo

Offered by Gooding & Company | April 2024

Photo – Gooding & Company

What do you call a motorcycle with four wheels? That’s not the start of a joke, but a description of what we’re dealing with here. It’s essentially a two-passenger motorcycle with… training wheels.

The Monotrace was designed by a German firm called Mauser but were built under license in France by Mecanicarm of St. Etienne between 1925 and 1928. The marque was Morgan-Monotrace, and the company was unrelated the Britain’s Morgan Motor Company.

The engine is a 520cc single. It’s got tandem seating and chain drive. Approximately 310 were built, and this one was in the Schlumpf reserve collection before coming to the Mullin museum. Very few of these exist, and this project-status example has a reserve of $10,000-$15,000. Click here for more info.

1902 Prunel

1902 Prunel Model F

Offered by Gooding & Company | April 2024

Photo – Gooding & Company

Radiator as front bumper is always a good choice, isn’t it? Ste des Usines Prunel was founded outside of Paris in 1900 by a J. Prunel. The company initially marketed their cars under the Atlas marque for the first two years. Prunel didn’t appear on the cars until 1902, and they sort of faded away after 1907. The Phenix was built at the Prunel factory between 1912 through 1914.

This car was imported to the U.S. in 1962, at which time it was restored in New Jersey. It remained on display at the Briggs Cunningham Museum and the Crawford Auto-Aviation Museum for decades before being acquired by the Mullin museum in 1990.

The engine is a single-cylinder unit, and it’s not running because it’s been on display for so long. Still, an estimate of $30,000-$50,000 for a car of this age, condition, and rarity seems like a bargain here, running or not. Click here for more info.

The Last Voisin

1938 Voisin C30 Cabriolet by Dubos

Offered by Gooding & Company | April 2024

Photo – Gooding & Company

The C30 was the final Voisin road car. Sure, there was a post-war prototype, but this was the last real model from the company. Coupes and convertibles were offered, but only about 30 chassis were completed in total. The Mullin museum had a copy of each.

This one has cabriolet coachwork by Dubos. Earlier Voisins utilized Knight sleeve-valve engines, but by this late in the game, Voisin had switched to a more modern powerplant (but still American): a supercharged 3.5-liter Graham-Paige inline-six (interestingly, Gooding described the last C30 as have a 3.6-liter engine).

This car entered the museum in 2008 and has been on display since, so it’ll need some work if you want to use it. The estimate is $150,000-$250,000. More info can be found here.

Bedelia Cyclecar

1913 Bedelia Type 8 Sport Torpedo

Offered by Gooding & Company | April 2024

Photo – Gooding & Company

Bedelia was a French marque that existed between 1910 and 1925. Prime time for cyclecars, which were light, low-powered cars that were cheap and efficient. They were a fad, really. And one that never came back. They were kind of like the proto-microcar.

Some of them featured tandem seating like this car. In today’s world, being positioned behind your passengers as the driver seems insane. The car features a V-twin engine turned to the side, unlike a Morgan of the same era.

This is another car that was acquired by the Mullin museum from as part of the Schlumpf reserve collection. It’s a project, but finding another one isn’t going to be easy (they’re out there, though). The estimate is $10,000-$20,000. More info can be found here.

Bugatti Wagon

1927 Bugatti Type 40 Break de Chasse

Offered by Gooding & Company | April 2024

Photo – Gooding & Company

Bugatti’s Type 40 was produced from 1926 through 1930. In that time, just 796 examples were made, including this one, which originally wore sedan bodywork. The model was powered by a 1.5-liter inline-four.

But the story here is twofold. One, the bodywork. It was in the 1930s or ’40s when the car was rebodied with wooden rear coachwork. It bounced around France for a few years before story number two comes into play: ownership. In 1958 it was sold to American Bugatti collector John Shakespeare.

In 1964, Shakespeare made one of the worst decisions in the history of car collecting: he sold his entire collection to the Schlumpf brothers in France. The brothers, of course, assembled a massive hoard of cars, with a focus on Bugattis, at the expense of their hard-working employees, who eventually rioted and took control of the factory and collection. It now lives on as the national automotive museum of France. Everything in there, locked away forever, never to be enjoyed as they were meant to be: driven.

However, this car was part of the museum’s “reserve” collection. That is, “extras.” When you have the car collecting status that Peter Mullin did, sometimes you can escape some trapped cars, and he bought the entire Schlumpf reserve in 2008. He died recently, and Gooding is liquidating his museum. So, through some roundabout circumstances over 60 years, the car is resurfacing and may someday again be driven. The estimate is $100,000-$150,000. More info can be found here.

6C 2300 B Turismo Cabriolet

1937 Alfa Romeo 6C 2300 B Turismo Cabriolet by Pinin Farina

Offered by Gooding & Company | Amelia Island, Florida | February/March 2024

Photo – Gooding & Company

Alfa’s 6C 2300 model was short lived compared to the 2500 model that followed. It was in produced from 1934 through 1938. In that time, the company turned out just 760 examples, with the “B” variants coming into the line in 1935.

These 2300 B variants still used the same 2.3-liter DOHC inline-six that produced 70 horsepower on this single-carburetor unit. This long-chassis Turismo model wears one-off coachwork by Pinin Farina.

The car was later on display at the 1938 International Motor Show in Berlin and then spent decades in Switzerland and later France and Italy. It is one of 81 Turismo cars built between 1936 and 1937, and it was restored in the 1990s. The estimate here is $900,000-$1,200,000. Click here for more info.

Niclausse Landaulette

1907 Niclausse Type S Landaulette by Binder

Offered by Gooding & Company | Amelia Island, Florida | February/March 2024

Photo – Gooding & Company

Here’s another Niclausse. Like the one we featured a week ago, this car is coming out of the Mullin collection and was acquired by them in 2007 from the family of the original Spanish owners. It was the 247th car registered in Barcelona.

The Type S is powered by a 2.4-liter inline-four rated at 12/16 taxable horsepower. This is another Binder-bodied car. Potentially a double order for the original owning family, with this being the city car and the big tourer being for the country.

For a collection so well known for its extravagant coachbuilt French classics from the 1930s, the Niclausse – a pair of them at that – seems like such an unlikely thing to be shown side by side. But I guess if you have a line on two one-owner, unrestored almost-unheard-of brass-era cars, you grab them. This one has an estimate of $50,000-$75,000. Click here for more info.

60HP Mercedes-Simplex

1903 Mercedes-Simplex 60HP Roi-des-Belges by J. Rothschild

Offered by Gooding & Company | Amelia Island, Florida | February/March 2024

Photo – Gooding & Company

The holy trio of Gottlieb Daimler, Wilhelm Maybach, and Emil Jellinek were responsible for the Mercedes-Simplex, which was the first in a long line of top-tier grand Mercedes road cars. Think of this as the predecessor to the current Mercedes-Maybach sedans.

The car came about because Jellinek, who was Daimler’s Nice-based sales guy, needed a better car than the earlier Daimlers to sell to his rich clients. The new cars were named for Jellinek’s daughter, Mercedes. The first Mercedes was the 35HP model of 1901. It was followed by 1902’s 40HP. The 60HP, which was developed through ’02 and ’03, was even… more.

These were performance cars in their day, used at time trials and other competition events. Even this car was run at the 1903 Nice Speed Trials (setting the fastest time) and an Irish hillclimb later that year (also winning). The car is powered by a 9.2-liter inline-four that was rated at 60 horsepower and a downright low 1,100 rpm. It has a four-speed manual gearbox, and the entire design was meant to be easy to use. Hence the Simplex name.

These were capable of 80 mph and were long and low. Just 102 examples of the 60HP were built between 1902 and 1905. Only five are known to exist. This J. Rothschild et Fils-bodied car was purchased new by publisher Alfred Harmsworth, he of The Daily Mail and The Daily Mirror. It was the 740th car registered in London.

The car was inherited by Harmsworth’s son around 1922 and, in the 1950s, was restored and put on display in the Beaulieu Motor Museum, where it stayed from 1956 through 2023. It has remained with two other members of the Harmsworth family since. That is 121 years of single-family ownership. Gooding has an estimate of “in excess of $10,000,000” on this, the ultimate veteran era car. More can be read here.

Niclausse Tourer

1907 Niclausse Type D Tourer by Binder

Offered by Gooding & Company | Amelia Island, Florida | February/March 2024

Photo – Gooding & Company

J. et A. Niclausse was the trading name for the car company started by Jules and Albert Niclausse in 1890. Thy were boilermakers and cars were sort of a side project produced in a separate factory. And the cars were not steam-powered, instead they were large gas-powered luxury cars.

Niclausse produced cars from 1906 through 1914. The Type D is powered by a 6.3-liter inline-four rated at 30/35 horsepower. It has rear drum brakes and a four-speed gearbox. The body was produced by Binder.

This example was sold new in Barcelona and remained with its original owning family until entered the Mullin collection in 2007 (alongside another Niclausse from the same family). The car has not been restored and will sell at no reserve with an estimate of $90,000-$120,000. More info can be found here.