Sunbeam-Talbot 2-Litre

1947 Sunbeam-Talbot 2-Litre Sports Tourer

Offered by H&H Classics | Buxton, U.K. | April 27, 2022

Photo – H&H Classics

Sunbeam-Talbot existed as a marque between 1935 and 1954. It was formed when the Rootes Group merged Sunbeam and Talbot together. By the mid-1950s, Talbot-Lago‘s existence made things confusing, so Talbot was dropped from English-built cars and Sunbeam existed for decades to come.

The 2-Litre was available from 1939 to 1948, with a break for the war. Power is from a 1.9-liter inline-four capable of 56 horsepower in post-war spec. Three body styles were offered, including this tourer, which was restored in the 1980s.

There were 1,306 examples of the 2-Litre built, and just eight are known to exist in the U.K. This one carries an estimate of $20,000-$26,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $22,029.

1923 Swift Tourer

1923 Swift M Type Tourer

Offered by H&H Classics | Buxton, U.K. | April 27, 2022

Photo – H&H Classics

The Swift Motor Company operated out of Coventry, England, between 1900 and 1931. Early cars used De Dion engines, then the company moved into cyclecars. After WWI, cyclecars were gone and more a traditional model range took their place.

This M Type is powered by a 2.0-liter inline-four that was rated at 12 taxable horsepower. The model was also known as the “12”. This attractive tourer sports some really cool wheels, the kind you only find on British cars of this era.

It was first restored in 1991 and again in 2013, with just 900 miles having been covered since. It now carries and estimate of $15,000-$20,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $11,702.

Mitsuoka Le-Seyde

1991 Mitsuoka Le-Seyde

Offered by H&H Classics | Buxton, U.K. | April 27, 2022

Photo – H&H Classics

Mitsuoka, the most Japanese of all Japanese car manufacturers, has built some wild-looking cars over the years. And this is certainly one of them. If you’ve always wanted a Zimmer or Tiffany that’s based on a Nissan Silvia. Well look no further.

The Le-Seyde was only produced between 1990 and 1993, with just 500 units produced. Later, a convertible version called the Dore was also built. Mitsuoka sold an updated Le-Seyde briefly in the 2000s (does that make it a neo-neo-classic?).

This car is powered by a 1.8-liter DOHC inline-four from an S13 Silvia that made about 131 horsepower when new. I think it wouldn’t look so outrageous (outside of the whole neo-classic thing) if it weren’t for those convex wheel covers. H&H estimates that $6,500-$9,000 will take this home. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $10,327.

Lagonda 12/24

1925 Lagonda 12/24 Tourer

Offered by H&H Classics | Duxford, U.K. | March 16, 2022

Photo – H&H Classics

Lagonda, which sounds somewhat exotic and high-end, is actually named after a place in… Ohio. The company, which is British, was founded by an Ohioan named Wilbur Gunn. It was taken over by Aston Martin in 1947 and used as a model name on a few Astons over the years.

But this car pre-dates Aston and was offered between 1923 and 1926 alongside the “12”, which carried a slightly lower taxable horsepower rating. Between the two models, approximately 6,000 examples were made, 2,250 of which were the 12/24. Only five are known to exist.

The car features semi-monocoque construction and is powered by a 1.5-liter inline-four that could push the car to 50 mph. Many later Lagondas have swoopy, sporty styling. But this early, more staid example is proof that the company had more humble roots. It has an estimate of $20,000-$22,500. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $21,666.

Martin Ford Special

1962 Martin Ford Special

Offered by H&H Classics | Buxton, U.K. | October 6, 2021

Photo – H&H Classics

I had the structure for this post all laid out, and then I went and read the H&H Classics catalog description. And it was pretty much the same thing I planned on writing, which was: the post-war sports car boom rode a pretty strong wave for about 15-20 years. Alongside established manufacturers, there were countless upstarts who were offering various forms of sports cars.

One such form was the kit car, or more appropriately at the time this was built, shells that could be bought and fitted to existing running gear. Basically, re-bodying a common car to make it into a sports car. In this case, Martin Plastics Maidstone Ltd offered their fiberglass shells beginning in 1953.

This particular one was purchased as a bare body in 1956 and was fitted to a 1939 Ford Prefect. The completed car was registered in 1962, hence the date listed. Power is from a 1.2-liter Ford inline-four, and the car was restored around 2016. About 500 Martin shells were sold, and only five are known to exist. This one is expected to go cheap with an estimate of $8,000-$11,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $8,010.

Leyland Tiger PS1

1947 Leyland Tiger PS1

Offered by H&H Classics | Online | November 25, 2020

Photo – H&H Classics

Well, last week we featured a lot of commercial vehicles. I said that we’d pick it up again on Monday. It’s now Tuesday, but here we are. The Tiger is a model of bus produced by Leyland Motors between 1927 and 1968, and again from 1981 through 1992. They looked different over the years, and this front-engined Tiger is of the post-war PS variety.

It is said to be one of two known survivors with coachwork by Barnaby (of four built). It was part of a private bus line for its commercial career, and it is powered by a 7.4-liter diesel inline-six.

This bus was restored in the 2000s, and it was restored to “bus-spec” and not converted into an RV like so many old buses have been. I’m a big fan of classic busses, and despite this one being overseas, I dig it a lot. It carries a pre-sale estimate of $26,000-$31,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

1915 Hupmobile

1915 Hupmobile Model HA Tourer

Offered by H&H Classics | Online | August 19, 2020

Photo – H&H Classics

Robert Hupp’s Hupp Motor Car Company produced the Hupmobile between 1909 and 1941. Yes, that’s right, this company survived most of the Depression, only to go bankrupt at the dawn of WWII. It was one of the last American marques to fold before war broke out, and production would not resume in 1945.

I’m not sure what a model “HA” is, as period Hupp literature did not mention one. Their 1915 lineup consisted of the Model 32 and Model K, both of which were available in touring form, though the K was a five-passenger version, compared to the four-seat Model 32. Both cars were powered by inline-fours, as is this one, with the 32 making its advertised horsepower and the K pumping out 36.

This touring car was imported to London in 1915 and was sold new in Dublin. It’s remained with the same family since new and was restored in 2016. It is expected to sell for between $26,000-$31,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $32,396.

July 2020 Auction Highlights

Jumping right in, Artcurial’s Monaco sale saw this 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL lead the way at $1,621,037.

Photo – Artcurial

The Venturi we featured sold for $65,501. Other cars that sold can be viewed here.

RM had a “European” online sale a week before having an “American” version, which is kind of weird, but I guess it you’re going to bundle cars together, you might as well do it by where they are located, or at least by what continent they are located on. Anyway, the Inaltera prototype sold for about $440,902. The top sale was $1,685,805 for this alloy-bodied 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB. Final results can be found here.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Onward to H&H Classics’ online sale. The two feature cars we had from this sale failed to find new homes and were re-consigned to H&H’s next sale in August (they were this Renault and this Willys). The top sale was this 1965 Alvis TD21 Drophead Coupe that brought $66,032. More results are available here.

Photo – H&H Classics

Bonhams’ MPH online sale is up next. The Lagonda V12 we featured failed to sell, but the Le Zebre went for $12,503. The top sale was this 1927 Bentley 3-Litre Speed Model that sold for $294,205. Click here for additional results.

Photo – Bonhams

And, finally, we have RM’s other online sale, the American one. We only featured one car from this one, the Alfa Romeo RZ, and it sold for $61,600. Top sale honors go to this 2005 Ford GT. All $291,500 of it. Final results can be seen here.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

1923 Willys-Knight

1923 Willys-Knight Model 64 Tourer

Offered by H&H Classics | Online | July 22, 2020

Photo – H&H Classics

Willys-Overland hopped on the sleeve-valve-engine train in 1914 when they launched the Willys-Knight brand. It came to be after Willys purchased New York’s Edwards Motor Car Company and moved their operations to the old Garford plant in Elyria, Ohio.

The Knight was available through 1933, and it was the only Willys-branded product offered between 1921 and 1930. Power is from a 3.0-liter Knight sleeve-valve inline-four rated at 40 horsepower when new. Sleeve-valve engines were expensive to produce, yet Willys built nearly half a million Knight-branded cars during the marque’s run.

This example presents well with shiny black wire-spoke wheels, nice blue paint, and a retractable black top. It is said to have remained with its original-owning family for about 90 years before being purchased by the consignor in 2015. It is now expected to fetch between $17,500-$22,500. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Update: Not sold, H&H Auctioneers online, August 2020.

Update: Not sold, H&H Auctioneers, August 2021.

Renault AZ Landaulette

1909 Renault Type AZ Landaulette

Offered by H&H Classics | Online | July 22, 2020

Photo – H&H Classics

Early Renaults have such a distinct look with their curved hoods set ahead of a bulkhead-mounted radiator. The Type AZ was produced in 1908 and 1909 and was a mid-size car. This example is proof that you don’t need the largest car a company offers in order to fit it with a fancy body.

This Landaulette was bodied by Lucas of London and features a covered, but otherwise open, driver’s compartment with a closed rear passenger compartment with a convertible top. The car is powered by a 2.4-liter L-head inline-four rated at 14 horsepower.

This example spent time in the U.S. before returning to Europe in 1990. Since then, it’s been repainted and has spent time a few private collections. It should now sell for between $56,000-$63,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Update: Not sold, H&H Auctioneers online, August 2020.