Cadillac Model F

1905 Cadillac Model F Four-Passenger Touring

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Auburn, Indiana | September 2-5, 2021

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The earliest Cadillacs were single-cylinder cars. The first multi-cylinder cars appeared in 1905, the same year in which the single-cylinder Model F was built. It was their most expensive of four single-powered models that year.

The F was identical to the Model E save for a two-inch-longer wheelbase. It was also available as a touring car with a non-detachable tonneau and two side doors – a first for a single-cylinder Cadillac. That single displaces 1.6 liters and made nine horsepower. The front hood is just for show – the engine is mounted under the seats.

Cadillac sold 4,029 cars of all types in 1905. The touring car variant oft he F (a delivery van was also available) retailed for $950 new. You can read more about this one here and see more from this sale here.

Update: Sold $51,700.

Locomobile Model H

1907 Locomobile Model H Touring

Offered by Bonhams | Amelia Island, Florida | May 20, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

Locomobile was one of America’s premier automakers before WWI. And this was the type of vehicle that they excelled at: a big, powerful, touring car. The Model H was produced from 1905 through 1907 and was only available as a limousine or a touring car.

Power is from by a 35-horsepower, 5.7-liter inline-four. This car would’ve cost approximately $4,500 when new – the price of a house in most of America. The Model H was the larger of the two 1907 models, the 90-horsepower Special race car notwithstanding.

This car was purchased by Henry Austin Clark Jr. in the 1940s and remained in his collection until it (the collection) was broken up in the 1980s. During Clark’s ownership, it wore a pickup truck body and was the go-to vehicle for members of his staff. The body it wears now is an authentic period body that was mounted circa 1990.

Only one Model H Locomobile survives – this one. And the pickup body is included in the sale. The pre-sale estimate is $160,000-$200,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $179,200.

Queen Model E

1905 Queen Model E Touring

Offered by Bonhams | Amelia Island, Florida | May 20, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

C.H. Blomstrom’s Queen was produced between 1904 and 1906 and was relatively successful. In all, about 1,500 cars were sold, but the company came under fire for being “defectively incorporated.” So Blomstrom merged his company with another, cashed out his stock, and opened another car company somewhere else in Detroit.

But the Queen’s legacy stood. Singles, twins, and four-cylinder cars were offered. The singles were among the most powerful of their kind, and the twins rivaled Packard with their output. The Model E was sold in 1905 and 1906 and features a 3.2-liter (presumably flat) twin that made approximately 16 horsepower. The E could only be had as a tourer like this.

This example was restored prior to being shown at Pebble Beach in 2005. It is the only Model E known to exist and is expected to sell for between $75,000-$100,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $80,640.

Alfa Romeo 2600 Spider

1963 Alfa Romeo 2600 Spider

Offered by Bonhams | Paris, France | March 3, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

The 2600 is one of Alfa’s great post-war designs. Produced between 1962 and 1968, the 2600 was available in sedan, coupe, and convertible form. The Spider, as seen here, was styled by Carrozzeria Touring. Only 2,255 examples of the Spider were built.

This one was sold new in the Netherlands and was restored a few years ago. It is finished in a yellowish cream with a black soft top and wire wheels. Power is from a 2.6-liter inline-six that made 145 horsepower from the factory. This car has been fitted with triple Webers that push power to a Sprint Zagato-like 164 horsepower.

This is a very attractive car in very good colors. It’s a usable tourer with styling from Touring. You can’t go wrong. The pre-sale estimate is $140,000-$180,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Touring Sciadipersia

2017 Touring Sciadipersia Coupe

Offered by Bonhams | Paris, France | March 3, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

Over the last five years or so, there has been this trend of coachbuilders and styling houses going out on their own to build limited-run cars. Such cars are then branded by the company that designed them. For instance, instead of “Maserati GranTurismo by Touring,” the company just called it a Touring Sciadipersia. Oh wait, that’s the car we have here.

It is based on Maserati’s GranTurismo and even retains Maser’s trident badging. But the body has been reworked, apparently in an attempt to mimic the Qvale Mangusta (how have we not featured a Qvale Mangusta!?). Anyway, this car shares the same 454-horsepower, 4.7-liter V8 with the GranTurismo Sport. It hits 60 in 4.8 seconds on the way to a 186-mph top end.

Touring planned to build 15 of these, but only one coupe and one convertible were ever completed, which makes this one of one. Pricing was never released when they were new, but this one is expected to bring between $460,000-$700,000 now. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Lambert Touring

1912 Lambert Model 66 5-Passenger Touring

Offered by Bring a Trailer Auctions | Online | December 2020

Photo – Bring a Trailer

So the story goes that John Lambert built his first gasoline-powered car in 1891, beating both the Duryea brothers and Elwood Haynes to the punch as having built America’s first gas-powered car. Lambert advertised that car for $500, but never actually sold any. A few years later, he got a visit from Haynes, who informed him that the Haynes would be advertised as “America’s first car.” Not quite true, Mr. Haynes.

Lambert never challenged it, and he didn’t start building cars for commercial sale until 1906. The Lambert Automobile Company was a subsidiary of the Buckeye Manufacturing Company that also owned several automotive suppliers. The company stopped producing cars in 1917.

The Model 66 was only built in 1912 and was available as a four- or five-passenger touring car. This five-passenger variant retailed for $1,500 when new and is powered by a 35-horsepower inline-four. This example was restored within the past 10 years and is now up for auction on BaT. The auction ends Monday. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $23,500.

Grant Touring

1918 Grant Model G Touring

Offered by The Vault | Online | October 1-14, 2020

Photo – The Vault

Grant was founded by brothers George and Charles Grant in Detroit in 1913. The company then moved to Findlay, Ohio, for three years until 1916, when they relocated again to Cleveland. When they launched, they were a cyclecar producer, but as that fad subsided, Grant introduced six-cylinder cars and sales took off. Unfortunately, they began stockpiling for this newfound success, right when the post-WWI economy tanked.

Grant was stuck with a huge inventory and no one to buy anything. They closed in 1922, although a few commercial vehicles puttered out for a brief time thereafter. This Model G is from 1918 and is powered by a 22-horsepower inline-six. Four body styles were offered by the factory for the G, which was again available in 1919.

This particular example was owned by the same family from 1946 until 2011, when it was purchased by the current collection. Grants aren’t too common today, and this one will sell at no reserve. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Studebaker Special Six

1922 Studebaker Special Six Touring

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Auburn, Indiana | September 3-5, 2020

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

This is a car I’d love to own because of the following: 1. It’s a Studebaker. 2. It’s a pre-1930 touring car and 3. It’s rocking some great colors, including blue-painted artillery wheels wearing whitewall tires. Studebaker offered three models in 1922: the base Light Six, the top-of-the-line Big Six, and the mid-level Special Six, which was also known as the Series 22 Model EL.

Power is from a 4.7-liter inline-six rated at 50 horsepower. Styling was sort of a carryover of the previous year’s Big Six, and six body styles were offered. The Special Six was built for three model years, and 111,443 were built across all styles for those three years.

Obviously restored, this car is fitted with a few factory options, including a spare tire, bumpers, and a motometer. It’s now offered at no reserve with an estimate of $25,000-$30,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $17,600.

Chalmers Model 11

1912 Chalmers Model 11 Touring

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Auburn, Indiana | September 3-5, 2020

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Many early car companies were started by engineers or industrialists. Chalmers was founded by a sales guy (sort of). The short version is the Thomas car company would become the Thomas-Detroit car company in 1906. Hugh Chalmers was a high-up at National Cash Register in Dayton, Ohio, and he was a helluva salesman. He was lured to a struggling Thomas-Detroit in 1908.

One of the conditions was that the name be changed to Chalmers-Detroit (sorry, E.R. Thomas). By 1910, they dropped the “Detroit” and were known simply as Chalmers through 1924. Chalmers had officially merged with Maxwell in 1922 after a being sort of common-law married for the previous few years. Walter Chrysler bought out Maxwell/Chalmers in 1923, and the rest is history.

1911 was actually Chalmers’ best year when they were the 8th largest automaker in the U.S. The 1912 range consisted of four models, including the 30-horsepower, 3.7-liter inline-four-powered Model 11. This large tourer is expected to bring between $18,000-$25,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $10,750.

Austro-Adler

1912 Austro-Adler 14/17HP

Offered by Dorotheum | Vosendorf, Austria | August 29, 2020

Photo – Dorotheum

I’m sitting here browsing the ultimate automotive encyclopedia. It’s three volumes and weighs a ton. It covers everything. But it does not mention the Austro-Adler. Here is the story: Adler, the German car company, built their first car in 1900. In 1907, a shop opened in Vienna. They were selling Adlers as Austro-Adlers, and that’s because the cars underwent a sort of “final assembly” there to get around import taxes.

It was gone by 1918, and it is unknown how many cars they moved. This is the only known survivor, and it is fantastic. It’s a boxy touring car with a sporty folding windshield and big artillery spoke wheels that are wearing white letter tires.

This model was not an actual Adler model. It is thought that perhaps the Austrians bumped up the power ratings for resale. The prevailing theory is that this is actually an Adler 7/17 model renamed for resale. It’s got an inline-four that I would estimate to be around 1.8-liters in capacity. This unusual and rare tourer is expected to sell for between $59,000-$82,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $149,515.