More Awesome Classic Commercial Vehicles

The Michael Banfield Collection

Offered by Bonhams | Staplehurst, U.K. | June 14, 2014


 1922 AEC S-Type Open Top Double Deck Bus

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

AEC is known as the double-decker bus company. Their Routemaster double-decker is one of the most famous of the type. But their double-deckers go back to before WWI. The S-Type was built between 1920 and 1927, with 849 (double-deckers) built for the London General Omnibus Company – for which this example was built.

The engine is a 35 horsepower 5.1-liter straight-four and it is said that this was as good as public transport got in London back in the day. It can transport up to 54 people – 26 inside and 28 up top in the weather.

This is thought to be one of only two S-Type double-deckers in existence. And it had a really cool story, which you can read more of here. The price? $130,000-$150,000.

Update: Sold $477,481.


1914 Hallford WD

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Hallford was the trade name of J & E Halls – who had acquired the rights to build Saurer commercial vehicles under license in the U.K. The first trucks came out in 1907 and by 1911, the model line has expanded significantly. When war broke out, Hallford was one company building trucks for the British Army.

This WD model is powered by a 5.3-liter four-cylinder engine. Hallford as a company wouldn’t make it to the Second World War, but this vehicle remains as a testament to their quality as it is in original, unrestored condition. That’s amazing, really, because it is 100 years old and survived a hellish war. It should bring between $30,000-$34,000. Click here for more.

Update: Sold $58,518.


1915 Fiat 18P Box Van

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

One of the coolest parts of owning a classic commercial vehicle is that it is probably pretty easy to get it cast in a movie set sometime in the past. This thing looks like it drove straight out of the flashback scenes in The Godfather Part II. It’s amazing how beautiful old trucks can be. There are new cars out now that don’t have this much style. It’s all in the details.

The Fiat 18P was built between 1915 and 1920. They are powered by a 4.4-liter straight-four. Only 6,354 were built – many of which were for the Italian Army. This one was acquired by Banfield as a chassis and restored as a box van. It should sell for between $37,000-$51,000. Click here for more.

Update: Sold $52,667.


1932 Leyland Titan TD2 Double Deck Bus

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Here’s a newer, more traditional-looking double deck bus, this one from Leyland. The Titan model was new for 1927 and would be produced until 1969 in various styles (although they took a break for the War). This was one of the last two gasoline-powered buses to operate in the U.K., exiting service in 1960. It actually operated on the Channel Island of Jersey.

The TD2 version was new for ’32 and would last through mid-1933. The engine was a 7.6-liter straight-six – although this one has an 8.8-liter engine from a Leyland truck. About 1,000 were built. it was restored over 50 years ago but still looks great. It should sell for between $47,000-$67,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $58,518.


1910 Karrier A60 Flatbed

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

The Karrier marque was around for a long time – from 1908 through the 1970s. Peugeot owns the trade name today, although it is dormant. This early delivery truck version of the model A60 was from 1910. The model was new for 1909, but only 15 were made that year.

The engine is a 5.7-liter straight-four driving the rear wheels with dual chain drive. This is one of the first commercial vehicles ever “collected” in the U.K. and has passed between collectors since 1954. It was a workhorse in its day, though. Only 46 examples were built in 1910, making this insanely rare. It should sell for between $30,000-$37,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $46,815.


1917 Pierce-Arrow R-8 Open Back

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Here is a relatively simple truck from one of the most prestigious manufacturers America has ever produced. Pierce-Arrow introduced trucks into their model range in 1911, more or less trying to keep pace with Peerless.

The R-Series of trucks was Pierce-Arrow’s contribution to the war effort for both America and some European countries: the company built over 14,000 trucks for the British and French governments alone. The engine is a 7.4-liter straight-four making 38 horsepower. It should sell for between $34,000-$42,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $46,815.


1929 Chevrolet LQ International 14-Seater Coach by Bush & Twiddy

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

This Chevrolet is a British Chevrolet and a precursor to the Bedford marque (which would be GM’s British commercial vehicle marque the year after this was built). What’s the coolest thing about this 14-passenger bus? Yes, that’s a convertible roof you see. How sweet.

The engine is a 2.9-liter straight-six. Michael Banfield bought this for £25 in the early 1960s and restored it in 1962-63. It’s been used a fair amount since. It should bring between $25,000-$34,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $68,272.


1917 Garner Model 15 Van

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Henry Garner was a British car dealer who, upon the outbreak of WWI, looked to American chassis manufacturer (and former steam car manufacturer) Gramm of Chillicothe, Ohio. Garner imported their chassis and sold them under his own name.

Engines ranged in power and design, but it wasn’t until 1925 that Garner actually designed his own vehicle. The interior and mechanicals seem largely original, although the paint is newer and nice. The pre-sale estimate is $42,000-$47,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $39,012.


1917 Maxwell Commercial Delivery Car

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Maxwell was founded by Jonathan Maxwell and Benjamin Briscoe. They mainly built cars during their existence between 1904 and 1925. They weren’t just some small company – at its height, Maxwell was selling over 10,000 cars a year. Which was a lot for the 1910s. Maxwell lives on today under its new name: “Chrysler.”

Although less well-known, Maxwell did built commercial vehicles their entire existence. The engine is a 3.0-liter straight-four. It’s a nice delivery vehicle that can be yours for between $34,000-$42,000. Click here for more info. And here for the rest of this awesome auction lineup.

Update: Sold $37,062.

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