1922 Stanley

1922 Stanley Model 735B Touring

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Hershey, Pennsylvania | October 5-6, 2017

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

By the time World War I broke out, the electric starter had already been invented and applied on numerous gasoline-powered automobiles. This wonderful, ease-of-use invention, coupled with the efficiency and cost savings of gas cars, was bad news for steam cars.

Stanley’s first car went on sale in 1901. The last car they listed was in 1927 but only a few cars were built after 1925. The Model 735 was introduced in 1918 and the the following year it was split between A (four-passenger touring) and B (seven-passenger touring) models, though to be fair there were also C and D models offered off and on until the 735 returned to a single model in 1922.

The engine is a steam-powered (this car has been recently converted to use gasoline to heat the boiler, which makes it a little more user-friendly), 20 horsepower two-cylinder, which helped make the Model 735 one of the best-selling Stanleys in company history. Despite the increasing obsolescence of steam cars, over 1,700 Model 735s were built and this one is selling at no reserve. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $36,300.

1922 Salmson Race Car

1922 Salmson AL3 GSS Course

Offered by Osenat | Fontainebleau, France | March 19, 2017

Photo – Osenat

The French Salmson company was founded by Émile Salmson in 1890. They produced a lot of airplanes and airplane engines but started building cars after WWII. The automotive arm split off from the airplane part of the company in 1922 and 1953 was the final year for Salmson automobiles.

The first Salmsons were essentially GN cyclecars built under license. The “AL” line of cars were small, lightweight cars and the AL3 – named for Andre Lombard, the man at the head of Salmson that launched the car part of the business – was part of that initial line of cars. Powered by a 1.1-liter straight-four, it has been upgraded to GSS trim. GS cars were Grand Sports – but the GSS, Grand Sport Special, featured a four-speed gearbox.

This race car has a torpedo body on it and was raced in period of a former WWI fighter pilot. It won at Brooklands and raced at Le Mans (not the 24 Hours). It ended up in the Le Mans museum in 1965 and stayed there until 1992. The current owner acquired it in 1994 and had it completely restored. In modern times, it has been driven with ease up to speeds of 82 mph, which has to be frightening. It should bring between $159,000-$212,000 at auction this weekend. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $168,636.

Durant Tourer

1922 Durant B-22 Tourer

Offered by Bonhams | Oxford, U.K. | June 20, 2015

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

The story of Billy Durant isn’t a super-happy one. It’s a shame that most people don’t even know who he was. He founded General Motors. Then got wedged out. So he attempted to found another General Motors (in the form of the company that bore his name). He introduced a couple of marques and then went bust when the Depression hit.

The Durant marque, under the Durant Motors corporate umbrella, was around from 1921 through 1932. The 1922 model range offered a four and six cylinder car (A-22 and B-22, respectively). The six-cylinder B-22 was built in 1922 and 1923 only and uses a 70 horsepower straight-six. It could be had in four body styles.

You don’t see Durants all that often, especially these early, larger-engined cars. This one made its way to Europe in 2008 and is entirely roadworthy. It’s neat, clean and attractive. It can be yours for between $28,000-$37,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Bonhams.

Update: Sold $25,499.

1922 Wills Sainte Claire

1922 Wills Sainte Claire Model A-68 Rumble-Seat Roadster

Offered by Bonhams | Amelia Island, Florida | March 12, 2015

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Wills Sainte Claire is an interesting marque for a few reasons. One, it’s three separate words and I can’t think of another car that can say that. Secondly, its founder, C. Harold Wills, was a former Ford employee responsible for the Model T’s vanadium steel as well as the Ford script logo we all know today. So the first word of the car’s name comes from this last name, the other two come from the Saint Clair River in Marysville, Michigan, where the Wills Sainte Claire factory was located (the “e”s were for cachet).

Wills left Ford with a check of $1.5 million in his back pocket and ventured out on his own in 1921. 1922 was the first year for manufacture and the Model A-68 was the only model offered. It featured a 67 horsepower V-8 and was available in six body styles with this four-passenger Rumble Seat Roadster being the least expensive model at $2,875.

This is a well-optioned example that has an older restoration but it still shows very nicely. It runs well and can be fun for you for between $110,000-$114,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $151,250.

More Awesome Classic Commercial Vehicles

The Michael Banfield Collection

Offered by Bonhams | Staplehurst, U.K. | June 14, 2014


 1922 AEC S-Type Open Top Double Deck Bus

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

AEC is known as the double-decker bus company. Their Routemaster double-decker is one of the most famous of the type. But their double-deckers go back to before WWI. The S-Type was built between 1920 and 1927, with 849 (double-deckers) built for the London General Omnibus Company – for which this example was built.

The engine is a 35 horsepower 5.1-liter straight-four and it is said that this was as good as public transport got in London back in the day. It can transport up to 54 people – 26 inside and 28 up top in the weather.

This is thought to be one of only two S-Type double-deckers in existence. And it had a really cool story, which you can read more of here. The price? $130,000-$150,000.

Update: Sold $477,481.


1914 Hallford WD

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

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AEC Double-Decker

 1922 AEC S-Type Open Top Double Deck Bus

Offered by Bonhams | Staplehurst, U.K. | June 14, 2014

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

AEC is known as the double-decker bus company. Their Routemaster double-decker is one of the most famous of the type. But their double-deckers go back to before WWI. The S-Type was built between 1920 and 1927, with 849 (double-deckers) built for the London General Omnibus Company – for which this example was built.

The engine is a 35 horsepower 5.1-liter straight-four and it is said that this was as good as public transport got in London back in the day. It can transport up to 54 people – 26 inside and 28 up top in the weather.

This is thought to be one of only two S-Type double-deckers in existence. And it had a really cool story, which you can read more of here. The price? $130,000-$150,000.

Update: Sold $477,481.

Awesome Classic Commercial Vehicles

The Michael Banfield Collection

Offered by Bonhams | Staplehurst, U.K. | June 14, 2014


 1915 Peerless TC4 4-Ton Open Back

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

This sale from Bonhams includes quite a number of really awesome commercial vehicles. I don’t have enough time to feature them individually, but because they’re so cool (and you so rarely see them at auction), I thought I’d do two posts that cover the coolest among them (which is pretty much all of them).

This truck is from one of America’s premier luxury car manufacturers. They started building trucks in 1911 and the U.S. Army loved them. The British government bought 12,000 of them between 1915 and 1918, during the First World War. This thing uses a 6.8-liter four-cylinder and was in service with the British government until 1956. It’s beautiful. And it should sell for between $34,000-$42,000. Click here for more.

Update: Sold $72,173.


1922 Tilling-Stevens TS3A Open Top Double Deck Bus

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

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Tilling-Stevens Double Decker

1922 Tilling-Stevens TS3A Open Top Double Deck Bus

Offered by Bonhams | Staplehurst, U.K. | June 14, 2014

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Thomas Tilling operated a very large horse-drawn omnibus service in London beginning in 1847. They built their first motor buses in 1911. W.A. Stevens invented a hybrid gas-electric bus and joined Tilling during the 1910s. That’s right, this thing is a hybrid.

This 1922 TS3A was a new model, replacing the original Tilling buses. The gas engine is a 5.7-liter straight-four making 40 horsepower (click here for some crazy technical details). The bus will seat 48 (22 inside and 26 outside).

Banfield rescued this thing from a scrapyard and began the restoration in 1972. It wasn’t finished until 2007. It is the last surviving example of a TS3A. If you’ve always wanted a red, London double-decker, here’s one of the first. It should sell for between $150,000-$190,000.

Update: Sold $367,295.

Renault Type II

1922 Renault Type II Tourer

Offered by H&H Auctions | Rockingham Castle, U.K. | June 21, 2014

Photo - H&H Auctions

Photo – H&H Auctions

Early Renaults are very distinctive. They had the weird sloped nose you see here with no radiator to speak of. And this big bug-eyed headlights next to it. The windshield is kind of narrow and they have solid flat rims. I wouldn’t call it “dorky” – but more “uniquely French.”

The Type II was introduced either in 1919 or 1922 and lasted likely through 1923. The engine is a 2.1-liter straight-four making 10 taxable horsepower. It was the smallest engine Renault made for those years.

This nice four-seat tourer has a fairly well-known history for being what it is. It has been fixed as needed and would be a great driver and tourer. It should sell for between $20,000-$23,750. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Liberty Touring

1922 Liberty Six Model 10-D Special Touring

Offered by RM Auctions | Hershey, Pennsylvania | October 10-11, 2013

1922 Liberty Six Model 10-D Special Touring

The Liberty Motor Car Company was founded in 1916 by Percy Owens – who had been a sales manager at two other automobile companies. The company built a lone six-cylinder model throughout its entire existence – which lasted until it went under and was bought out by Columbia in 1923.

The Model 10-D was the final version of the Liberty Six. Introduced in 1921, it used a 56 horsepower version of the 3.4-liter straight-six. This Special Touring model is one of 10 Libertys known to exist. It was once owned by Bill Harrah and was sold off from his collection in 1986. It is currently being offered from the estate of John O’Quinn.

Pre-sale estimates have not been published as of this writing, but this car should bring between $30,000-$50,000. Edit: RM just posted them and I just missed it – the actual estimate is $40,000-$60,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $19,250.