Yale Model G

1905 Yale Model G

Offered by H&H | Buxton, U.K. | December 8, 2021

Photo – H&H

There were two different Yale-branded automobiles that came out of the Midwest U.S. before 1920. The first was the company that produced this car. The Kirk Manufacturing Company of Toledo, Ohio, built bicycles before turning to cars, for which they used the Yale name.

This car is from the marque’s final year of manufacture, 1905, in which three models were offered. The G was the mid-range model and was only available as a side-entrance, five-passenger tonneau. The engine is a flat-twin that was rated at 14/16 horsepower when new.

This car would’ve cost $1,100 in 1905, and it’s obviously been restored. It’s got an electric starter now and carries a pre-sale estimate of $40,000-$53,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Vanden Plas Princess

1965 Vanden Plas Princess R

Offered by Bonhams | Bicester, U.K. | December 11, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

Vanden Plas was actually a coachbuilder that was founded in Brussels, Belgium, in 1870. A London branch opened in 1913. Multiple iterations of the company existed up after bankruptcies, etc., and eventually the name was bought by Austin in 1946.

Beginning in 1958, Vanden Plas marketed cars as a marque in their own right, and this continued on through about 1968. Later Jaguars used Vanden Plas as a model/trim name. The Princess R was the second-generation model of the Vanden Plas Princess, and it was built from 1964 through 1968.

Power is from a 3.9-liter Rolls-Royce inline-six that made 175 horsepower. Top speed was 112 mph. This badge-engineered Austin cost as much as a Jaguar Mk X when new. So, it didn’t fare all that well. Only 6,999 were built. Footnote: this was the only non-Rolls-Royce production car to use a RR engine. It now has a pre-sale estimate of $11,000-$16,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Duesenberg J-360

1930 Duesenberg Model J Convertible Sedan by Murphy

For Sale by Hyman Ltd | St. Louis, Missouri

Photo – Hyman Ltd.

As far as Model Js go – especially four-door examples – this is a pretty great one. The two-tone burgundy paintwork and non-supercharged (internal) exhaust makes for a very clean, elegant look. A body by the Walter M. Murphy Company on a long-wheelbase chassis certainly doesn’t hurt.

Power is from a 6.9-liter Lycoming inline-eight that made 265 horsepower when new. The car was purchased new by Lew Wallace Jr., grandson of the author of Ben-Hur. Interestingly, Hyman refers to this as the “Ben-Hur Duesenberg.” Imagine being defined by a book your grandfather wrote. Apparently such extravagances were not doing the Wallace family any favors, as they had to sell the Duesenberg for a ’32 Ford sedan during the Depression.

This chassis retains its original engine, body, and firewall. The engine was rebuilt in the late 1990s, and the paintwork dates to the 1950s. The car is for sale in St. Louis with a listed price between $1.4 and $1.5 million. Click here for more info.

1923 Crossley

1923 Crossley 19.6HP Two-Seater

Offered by Bonhams | Bicester, U.K. | December 11, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

Crossley Motors was founded in Manchester, England, in 1906. Passenger car production lasted through 1938, while commercial vehicles (and military trucks) were produced through 1945. After the war, the company focused on buses before being bought by AEC and phased out.

This inter-war “two-seater’ (it has a dickey seat in the back as well) was returned to the U.K. from Australia in 1990 and restored. Power is from an inline-four rated at approximately 20 horsepower when new.

Crossleys are around, but they aren’t super common. This one has a sporty body style with a 30-year-old restoration. It should bring between $27,000-$40,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

1937 Detroit Electric

1937 Detroit Electric Model 99C Coupe

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | St. Louis, Missouri | December 1-8, 2021

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Detroit Electric started selling electric cars in 1907. Most of them were fairly stodgy, upright boxes on wheels. They were marketed towards women, and the company was very successful while electric cars remained popular.

However, that popularity faded into the 1920s. As time wore on, sales plummeted while styling became more mainstream. Bankruptcy occurred in the early 1930s, and the last production Detroit Electrics were sold in 1935. After that, they were available on a per-order basis. Only a “handful” (as if they can fit in your hand) were sold between 1936 and 1939. The company advertised up until 1942.

This is one of the last examples produced, and by this point, the company wasn’t even producing its own bodies anymore. This is a Willys coupe with a Dodge front end. Yes, there is a grille and hood louvers… even though there is not an engine. Late Detroit Electrics were five-horsepower cars, and they even retained the very early cars’ tiller steering! Check out more about this one here and see more from this sale here.

Formosa 120 GR

1967 Formosa 120 GR

Offered by Historics Auctioneers | Weybridge, U.K. | November 27, 2021

Photo – Historics Auctioneers

Okay, so this car is not from 1967. Formosa has only been building cars for a few years, and this one was built around a 1967 Triumph Herald. That means that the chassis is from 1967, but the body and interior are fresh. This isn’t a replica of anything specific, but is more in the fashion of 1950s/60s sports specials which was: applying a sporty body to a less sporty chassis.

Power is from a 2.0-liter inline-six, which is not a Herald motor, but is likely from a Triumph Vitesse. If so, it was a 95-horsepower engine when new. The body is fiberglass, and the interior is 1950s-sports-racer spartan.

There are more than one of these floating around. This right-hand-drive example carries a pre-sale estimate of $28,000-$34,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Rene Bonnet Djet II

1964 Rene Bonnet Djet II

Offered by Bonhams | London, U.K. | December 4, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

We’ve featured a Djet before, a later Mk V variant. Those were branded as Matras, as Matra had taken over Rene Bonnet Automobiles in October 1964. By that point Matra was producing the bodies and supplying a factory for the production of the cars anyway.

Rene Bonnet was half of Deutsch-Bonnet before venturing out on his own. The first Djet (“jet”) debuted in 1962. The Djet II came later and featured a Gordini-tuned 1.1-liter inline-four that made 85 horsepower. The mid-engined sports car had a top speed of 111 mph.

This example has been with the same owner since 1992. Production figures vary, as Bonhams reports “181” produced, but I think they mean of all Rene Bonnet-branded Djets. Gordini-powered “II” production was likely less than 40. This one should bring between $47,000-$67,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Boshart EV

2011 Boshart Tersus EV

Offered by Mecum | Kansas City, Missouri | December 2, 2021

Photo – Mecum

Boshart Engineering, who is no longer in business, did some development work on the Phoenix SUT, which was an electric truck that looked identical to this one and was built by Phoenix Motorcars in Anaheim, California. Well Boshart, also of California, decided to produce their own version.

The bodies were the same. And neither company designed it. It’s actually a SsangYong Actyon Sports pickup, a truck from South Korea that was never sold in the U.S. The powerplant on this truck is a 37-horsepower electric motor. It’s got a two-speed automatic transmission and a reported top speed of 25 mph.

Why so slow? Well these were intended for use on “private land” or closed campuses. Not the highway. Or even the street. But they cost $30,000 when new. Thus, only 10 were sold. You can check out more about this one here and see more from Mecum here.

One-Off Iso Truck

1966 Iso Centomila

Offered by Finarte | Online | November 29, 2021

Photo – Finarte

This may look like a Haflinger built by a refrigerator company but… oh wait, that’s sort of exactly what it is. When Iso Rivolta shifted from appliance to motorcycle manufacture after WWII, they also expanded into other territories, including microcars and sports cars.

So why not give off-road vehicles a go? This was the only one built, and it’s powered by a Fiat inline-twin sourced from a 500 Giardiniera. Apparently Iso sent it to Fiat for evaluation, and they liked it and wanted to take over, but Renzo Rivolta refused.

So the little truck returned to Iso, where it was used as a service truck. It’s the only one like it, and it’s expected to sell for between $21,500-$32,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

JBA Falcon

1991 JBA Falcon Roadster

Offered by H&H | Online | November 24, 2021

Photo – H&H

JBA Engineering, later JBA Motors, was founded by Kenneth Glyn Jones, John Barlow, and David George Ashley in Norwich, U.K., in the late 1970s. They were all engineers at British Leyland. The Falcon was introduced in 1982 and was based on Ford Cortina running gear.

Yes, it’s kind of a neo-classic sort of thing, as it isn’t an exact replica of anything in particular. It’s just supposed to evoke the look and feeling of a much older British sporting car. The body is aluminum with fiberglass fenders. This example is powered by a 2.0-liter Ford inline-four. Some cars had V6s.

It spent several years in storage with its original owner before being recently refreshed. JBA went out of business in 2007. This car, which was completed in 1991, is expected to sell for $5,000-$8,000. Click here for more info and here more from this sale.