Wiesmann MF30

2001 Wiesmann MF30 Roadster

Offered by Oldtimer Galerie | Gstaad, Switzerland | December 29, 2019

Photo – Oldtimer Galerie

There have been a slew (three) of Wiesmanns being auctioned lately. And each of the three has been a different model. The MF30 was the company’s first product and was followed up by the MF3.

It’s powered by a 3.0-liter BMW inline-six good for 228 horsepower and 221 lb-ft of torque. It hit 60 mph in about five seconds and topped out at 143 mph.

This car is listed in the auction catalog as an MF3, which would’ve been powered by a 3.2-liter inline-six. The earlier MF30 was the 3.0-liter version, which is why I have it listed as such. There really aren’t many external differences between the two. No estimate is yet available, but you can see more here and see more from this sale here.

Alvis TC 108G

1957 Alvis TC 108G

Offered by Oldtimer Galerie | Gstaad, Switzerland | December 29, 2019

Photo – Oldtimer Galerie

The Alvis TC21 was a sedan and convertible produced by Alvis in the early 1950s and it carried a very old-school-style body. Swiss coachbuilder Graber designed an updated body for the TC21 that was very different and much more modern than what Alvis was offering. Alvis liked it so much that they decided to make it its own model.

Just 35 examples were produced between 1956 and 1958. Power is from a 3.0-liter inline-six that made 104 horsepower. Though the body was designed by Graber, Alvis outsourced some of the production to Willowbrook of Loughborough, though 19 of the cars were still bodied by Graber.

The entire ordeal was just too expensive, hence the low build number. Alvis canceled the Willowbrook contract and pivoted to Park Ward, who tweaked the design, which was then built as the TD21. You can read more about this Graber-bodied coupe here and see more from this sale here.

Supercharged Alfa 6C 1750

1929 Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 Supercharged Super Sport Spider

Offered by Bonhams | London, U.K. | December 7, 2019

Photo – Bonhams

The Alfa 6C 1500 gave way to the 6C 1750 in 1929. Displacement, obviously, increased and the straight-six engine jumped to 1,752cc. Six different series of the 1750 were produced between 1929 and 1933.

Within those six series were an array of different models. The Super Sport, which was available in both supercharged and non-supercharged form, was only available in 1929 as a “Series III” model. For 1930, it became the Gran Sport, all of which carried a supercharger. This Supercharged Super Sport made 85 horsepower when new.

This car carries coachwork from Zagato and it does not appear to have been fully restored. This 6C 1750 Series III Super Sport is one of 112 built and should bring between $1,000,000-$1,600,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Sharknose Graham

1939 Graham Model 97 Sedan

Offered by Mecum | Kansas City, Missouri | December 5-7, 2019

Photo – Mecum

The “sharknose” Graham was introduced for 1938 and it was a pretty radical design. The design lasted into 1940, and four models were offered in 1939: the Model 96 (which could be had in Special or Custom form) and the Type 97 (which was available in base or Custom form). Both Type 97 models were supercharged.

The 3.6-liter inline-six featured a Graham-designed supercharger that allowed for about 115 horsepower. The auction catalog does not note that this car is supercharged, but if it were a Model 97 from the factory, it would’ve been.

As great as the cars look today, they weren’t strong sellers when new. Graham managed to move only about 3,600 units in 1939. By 1940, they switched to producing the Hollywood, but the company was doomed. You can see more about this car here, and more from this sale here.

Delahaye Type 97 Skiff

1924 Delahaye Type 97 Double Phaeton Skiff by Labourdette

Offered by Coys | London, U.K. | December 4, 2019

Photo – Coys

The best-known Delahayes are from the 1930s and 1940s. These would mainly be derivatives of the 135. Earlier Delahayes are less fondly remembered, but, as you can see here, they still had the ability to be somewhat fantastic.

I don’t have a lot of info on the Type 97, but it appears to be a descendant of the post-WWI Type 84 and Type 92, the latter of which was powered by a 2.5-liter inline-four.

This car supposedly features a wood skiff body by Labourdette. The well-restored interior features green buttoned leather and an engine-turned dash panel. The car should sell for between $40,000-$50,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

550 GTZ Barchetta

2001 Ferrari 550 GTZ Barchetta by Zagato

Offered by Bonhams | London, U.K. | December 7, 2019

Photo – Bonhams

The Ferrari 550 Maranello was produced between 1996 and 2002. In 2000, the company launched the 550 Barchetta, a convertible version that marked Ferrari’s fun new business of chopping the top and jacking up the price for a limited-edition model. Only 448 Barchetta examples were built.

This one was later customized by coachbuilder Zagato. It was actually developed with Ferrari as a convertible variant of the 575 GTZ, which itself was a Zagato-modified version of the 550’s followup car, the 575M Maranello. Because the 575 Superamerica (the 575’s expensive drop-top version) had yet to enter production, they backtracked to the 550 Barchetta to built the drop-top 575 Zagato.

When new, this car cost $1 million. It’s powered by a 478 horsepower, 5.5-liter V12. They planned to build five, but only three were completed. And this is the only right-hand-drive example. The pre-sale estimate is $640,000-$900,000, and you can read more about it here. See more from Bonhams in London here.

Superbird

1970 Plymouth Superbird

Offered by Barrett-Jackson | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 11-19, 2020

Photo – Barrett-Jackson

We’ve featured a pair of Plymouth Superbirds in the past. One was a former NASCAR race car, and the other was Hemi-powered. Aside from the 426ci Hemi, Plymouth offered another engine in the “base” Superbird – a 440ci V8.

It came in two forms. One had a single four-barrel carburetor and made 375 horsepower, and the other, as this car has, is the same 7.2-liter V8 but with three two-barrel carburetors (the “Six-Barrel”) good for 390 horsepower.

This car is finished in Limelight Green, and it looks amazing. Production numbers, somehow, aren’t quite known. Everywhere you look gives you a different answer. It’s thought that about 1,920 Superbirds were produced in total. Only about 665 of those were Six-Barrel 440 cars. This one is selling at no reserve. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Wiesmann MF5 Roadster

2010 Wiesmann GT MF5 Roadster

Offered by Coys | London, U.K. | December 4, 2019

Photo – Coys

Wiesmanns are some of the coolest boutique sports cars from the last 20 years. Unfortunately, they went out of business in 2014. The last model they introduced was the GT MF5, which went on sale in 2009.

It’s powered by a monster 5.0-liter V10 from BMW that puts out 547 horsepower. Sixty arrived in 3.9 seconds, and the car topped out at 193 mph. What happened during production of the MF5 was that BMW discontinued the V10-powered M5 and M6, so many of the MF5s ended up with V8s.

Only 55 MF5 roadsters were built, but as few as 10 were finished with the V10 engine, making this a rare supercar. You can read more about it here and see more from this sale here.

Scimitar GT

1965 Reliant Scimitar GT

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | November 27, 2019

Photo – Brightwells

The Scimitar was a line of two-door sports cars produced by Reliant (and later, Middlebridge) between 1964 and 1990. The original car was designed by David Ogle and is quite attractive when equipped with wire wheels as we see here.

The first cars were produced in 1964 and early 1965 and were powered by a 120 horsepower, 2.6-liter Ford inline-six. Top speed was 117 mph. Later cars used a V6, and only 296 examples of the straight-six-powered Scimitar were built.

This one was recently repainted and looks good. Later cars favored a shooting brake body style, but this is a true coupe. It should bring between $6,500-$7,750. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $10,848.

Ferrari 126 C2

1982 Ferrari 126 C2

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Abu Dhabi, U.A.E. | November 30, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The 126C was Ferrari’s 1981 Formula One car. It replaced the 312T series of cars that dated back to 1975. For 1982, the chassis was heavily updated to C2 specification, and it was iterated upon thereafter through 1984.

Power is from a turbocharged 1.5-liter V6 that made about 600 horsepower in race trim. Driving duties for 1982 were split between Gilles Villeneuve (who died mid-season), Didier Pironi, Patrick Tambay, and Mario Andretti. No single driver competed in every race. The competition history for this chassis includes:

  • 1982 British Grand Prix – 3rd (with Patrick Tambay)
  • 1982 French Grand Prix – 4th (with Tambay)
  • 1982 German Grand Prix – 1st (with Tambay)
  • 1982 Italian Grand Prix – 3rd (with Mario Andretti)
  • 1982 Caesars Palace Grand Prix (Las Vegas) – 19th, DNF (with Andretti)

The car left Ferrari’s private collection in 2000 and has been used in events since. This race-winning F1 car from the Scuderia is the only survivor of seven examples of the type built. It should sell for between $2,000,000-$2,500,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.