Porsche 911R

2016 Porsche 911R

Offered by Bonhams | Knokke-Heist, Belgium | October 7, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

We do not feature cars that are still in production… generally. The Porsche 911R is currently in production, but Porsche – a reputable company unlikely to go bankrupt in the next 18 months – has already stated that only 991 of these will be built. And we believe them. But why 991? Because this car is sort of the last hurrah for Porsche’s 991 model of the 911.

It’s basically a 911 GT3 RS without the garish wing and roll cage. It’s a little simpler, more streamlined and basic. It’s kind of a sleeper – a pure driver’s car. The engine is a 493 horsepower 4.0-liter flat-six – making the 911R also a last hurrah for the naturally-aspirated 911. Top speed is 201 mph because this thing has been lightened to the max. It also has a pure, three-pedal six-speed manual gearbox. No paddles here.

The color scheme here is fantastic – all 911Rs carry this scheme with different colors available. With Porsche prices rising wildly in the last two years, this is a car that will appreciate rapidly – it already has and they are still building them. This has to be one of the first on the open market and will sell for just a little over the as-new price of $185,950 with an auction estimate of $280,000-$390,000. This is about as cheap as one will ever cost. Happy bidding! Click here for more info and here for the rest of Bonhams’ Belgian lineup.

Willys Silver Streak

1932 Willys 6-90 Silver Streak Rumble Seat Roadster

Offered by Bonhams | Philadelphia, Pennsylvania | October 3, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

In 1930, Willys started selling cars under the “Willys” brand again for the first time in ten years (the Willys-Knight continued through 1933). In the 1920s, the company had introduced a sub-brand called Whippet that went out of production in 1931. So for 1932, what was the Whippet became the Willys Silver Streak. Two different models were offered, with this, the 6-90, being the base.

Powered by a 3.2-liter straight-six making 65 horsepower, the Rumble Seat Roadster cost $545 when new. The styling is very nice and will probably be mistaken for a Model A Ford at your local cruise in.

The restoration is over 20 years old and it has spent time in a museum. This would be a fun alternative to the seemingly standard Ford and Chevys of the era – it’s much rarer for sure. The final price will likely be between $20,000-$30,000. Click here for more info and here for the rest of Bonhams lineup.

Pullman Light Touring

1908 Pullman Model H Light Touring

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Hershey, Pennsylvania | October 6-7, 2016

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Model H was Pullman’s entry-level model in 1908 – the only year this model was produced. There were four other models above it in the Pullman line but the Model H was the only model available in more than one body style: it could be had as a Runabout or Detachable Tonneau.

Costing just under $1,900 when new, it was not inexpensive… but that should be pretty obvious as it is a big car with a good amount of brass. The powerplant is a 20 horsepower 2.7-liter straight-four. This example was restored a while ago, but the body and interior have been well maintained (though the engine has been rebuilt more recently, making it a great driver).

Only 873 Pullmans were built in 1908 and this is the oldest, known, surviving restored Pullman in existence. That means there aren’t any cars from this manufacturer from 1905, 1906, or 1907 that are still around (or apparently in restored condition). At any rate, opportunities to acquire a car from this rare marque don’t happen often and RM has two of them at this sale. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Chalmers Pony Tonneau

1911 Chalmers Thirty Pony Tonneau

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Hershey, Pennsylvania | October 6-7, 2016

Photo - RM Sotheby's

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

1911 was the first year that Chalmers built cars under the “Chalmers” marque. Prior to that, all of the cars were badged as Chalmers-Detroit, referencing the Thomas-Detroit automobile company that Hugh Chalmers purchased in 1908.

But that doesn’t mean the model was new – the Thirty was introduced in 1909 (and lasted through 1913). A 30 horsepower, 3.7-liter straight-four powers this car and when carrying this attractive and borderline-sporty Pony Tonneau body, the new owner would’ve been set back $1,600 in 1911. It was a mid-range price for the Thirty.

This is a great brass era car that can be driven and used (it had an electric starter and other bits added to it during its most recent restoration to make it livable). It should bring between $125,000-$150,000. Click here for more info and here for more from RM in Hershey.

Also, I’m pretty sure I’ve seen this car in person:

Locomobile Steam

1899 Locomobile Style 2 Stanhope

Offered by Bonhams | Philadelphia, Pennsylvania | October 3, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Around the turn of the century, Locomobile was among America’s largest automobile manufacturers. In fact, in 1901 and 1902, they were the largest (this was right before Oldsmobile and Ford reinvented mass production). The company was founded in 1899 by John B. Walker and Amzi L. Barber. The two of them purchased a design by the Stanley brothers and sold their first steam cars in 1899.

Costing $600 when new, the 1899 and 1900 Locomobiles were identical and only available in this body style. While they are rare, there are a good number of them still around and we’re amazed we’ve yet to feature one. The steam engine powering this Locomobile develops four horsepower at 150 psi.

This particular example has had two owners from new with the family that currently owns it having acquired it in 1930. It was restored 60 years ago and is used infrequently, thus the decision to part with the car. It’s one of the best examples around with a clear, known history and it should bring between $45,000-$65,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

September 2016 Auction Highlights

First up, Bonhams’ Chantilly Sale. There was a collection of Horch motorcars offered here and we were able to feature two of them. The streamlined coupe was withdrawn from the sale but the 780 B Cabriolet brought $712,701. The top overall seller was this 1935 Mercedes-Benz 500K Roadster for $5,960,772. Click here for all of the results.

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Hopping across the English Channel to London, we have RM Sotheby’s and the big money they drew for this 1960 Aston Martin DB4GT that went for $3,226,720.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

A previously-featured Vallee sold here for $114,061. Our two feature cars both sold, with the Morgan bringing $172,592 and the Monteverdi $210,112. Full results can be found here.

Onward, and back to America, for Auctions America and their fall Auburn sale. The top two sales were both feature cars – and both Duesenbergs. The Franay Sunroof Model J sold for $715,000 and the Murphy Convertible Sedan went for $880,000. We’ll give our Interesting Sale award to this 1930 Buick Series 60 Sport Roadster that sold for $69,850.

Photo - Auctions America

Photo – Auctions America

The Dart Highwheeler we featured sold for $14,300 and you can see all of the other sales (and cars still available) here.

Mecum’s inaugural Louisville sale ended on September 10th and, while we didn’t feature anything from this sale, the top seller was this 1970 Chevrolet Chevelle LS6 Convertible for $280,000. Check out full results here.

Photo - Mecum

Photo – Mecum

And the last auction for this rundown is Artcurial’s dispersion of the Normandy Tank Museum in France. We featured an M4 Sherman that sold for $330,540 but the top sale was a different M4 Sherman (technically, a 1944 Chrysler M4A4 Sherman) for $387,242. Click here for more WWII relics.

Photo - Artcurial

Photo – Artcurial

Duesenberg J-347

1930 Duesenberg Model J Dual Cowl Phaeton by Murphy

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Hershey, Pennsylvania | October 6-7, 2016

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

This Duesenberg Model J – which is beautifully photographed, despite the fact that geese are evil – is one of the more desirable body styles that was ever produced in a more-than-one-off quantity. The Dual Cowl Phaeton is one of the most interesting bodies you can have on an old touring car because it’s not something you can find and any new car. Anywhere.

The second windshield provided some wind and weather protection for backseat passengers (and notice just how far back they really are). On this car, Murphy has actually angled the rear glass like the front, making the rear seat compartment look quite sporty if taken alone. And, as is the case with all Model Js, this car is powered by a 6.9-liter straight-eight making 265 horsepower.

Murphy only built three Dual Cowl Phaetons and this is one of those cars. It is numbers matching from new (which is rare in itself). The car was restored in the early 1960s and has been maintained since. There’s an interesting history here, too: J-347 was sold new in Massachusetts but the owner moved to Mexico and in 1945, sold the car to a Mexican businessman. It was later featured in a film and then walled up in an airport parking garage by its next owner for years until being discovered and relocated to America.

The same family has owned this car for 54 years meaning this will be the first time it has changed hands in the modern era. It’s a stunning design on an incredible chassis and should bring big money. Click here for more info and here for more from RM Sotheby’s.

Galloway Wagon

1908 Galloway Dual Purpose Vehicle

Offered by Bonhams | Philadelphia, Pennsylvania | October 3, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

The Galloway was an American automobile built by the William Galloway Company of Waterloo, Iowa, between 1908 and 1911. The lone product of the company between 1908 and 1910 was this so-called Dual Purpose Vehicle, named because it was meant to “drive to church on Sunday and be put to work on Monday.”

Having been built in Iowa, the Highwheeler design was probably apt, as it could be used by country folk to get around on the rough, unpaved roads of the day. The engine is a 14 horsepower flat-twin and the tires are solid.

Costing $570 when new, this extremely rare example is expected to bring between $10,000-$20,000 at auction. This wagon is almost all-original (except for a very old repaint) and has been in the same ownership since the 1930s(!). It’s not running now but has in recent years and can probably be made streetable with relative ease. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Pullman Roadster

1910 Pullman Model O Roadster

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Hershey, Pennsylvania | October 6-7, 2016

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

When one thinks of Pullman, they probably think of the luxurious Pullman railroad cars and maybe even the U.S. Army breaking up a striking labor union. Classy American Brass Era cars might not pop to mind, but after taking in the beauty of this fine automobile, they should.

The Pullman (named for the railroad cars, but not related) was built by the York Motor Company in Pennsylvania between 1905 and 1917. It was founded by Albert Broomell and Samuel Baily and quite a few models were offered over the years. The Model O was built in 1910 and 1911 and was the entry-level model offered by the firm in these years. This example is powered by a 40 horsepower 4.2-liter straight-four. The Model O could be had as a Toy Tonneau or Roadster in 1910.

A nearly $1,700 when-new price was not at all cheap in its day. This car sports an “older” restoration but it looks good and would be a head-turner at any old car event. Only 23 Pullman motor cars still exist and this is the only Model O. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Matford Cabriolet

1937 Matford V8 Model 72 Cabriolet by Antem

Offered by Artcurial | Château-sur-Epte, France | October 9,  2016

Photo - Artcurial

Photo – Artcurial

Ford Motor Company set up shop all over the world after conquering the United States. They had arms in Brazil, Australia, Germany, Britain, and even France (and for the most part, still do). The history of Ford in France is probably the most unusual – founded in 1916, the original company didn’t fare so well because the cars were too pricey.

Enter Émile Mathis, who started building cars under his own name in 1910. At the onset of the 1930s, his fortunes waned and his company was pretty much finished. But Ford, who was also struggling, partnered with the beleaguered French firm and formed Matford (it was technically a joint venture tilted 60/40 in Ford’s favor). Matford copied British Fords, but were British Fords ever this stylish?

The V8 was a 2.2-liter unit that made 60 horsepower. Matford built cars between 1934 and 1942, with the final two years churning out only a few cars as the Germans controlled the factory and focused on trucks. After the war, Mathis was not invited by the French government to continue production, but Ford reformed its company as Ford SAF and built stylish cars until 1954 when it became part of Simca (which later became part of Chrysler until Chrysler sold its European brands to Peugeot).

This pretty 2/3-seater cabriolet was restored in the 1960s. Ford didn’t offer a cabriolet in 1937, so this car was actually bodied by Antem. It’s a rare style that isn’t seen often but it is well done. It has spent a long time in the present collection and is not roadworthy (and doesn’t even have a battery in it). Slight recommissioning is required before enjoyment. It should bring between $20,250-$27,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.