Talbot-Lago T14 Special

1956 Talbot-Lago T14 LS Special Coupe

Offered by Bonhams | Monaco | May 13, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

When Talbot reorganized under Tony Lago in 1935, they immediately started building some of France’s most spectacular cars. The great coachbuilt age may have disappeared when WWII broke out, but beautiful cars kept coming from Talbot-Lago through the end of the 1950s.

The Talbot-Lago Sport went by a few different names in different variations. The T14 LS was introduced in 1955 and it was set apart from other Sport-based models by its engine: a 2.5-liter straight-four making 120 horsepower. Even better was the Special model, which was equipped with aluminium body panels, Borrani wire wheels and a performance camshaft.

This particular example was the factory demonstrator and was used by famed racer Louis Rosier and has had nine owners over the years. It was restored in 1994 and still looks great. Only 54 examples of the T14 LS were built and only seven or eight of those were Specials. It should bring between $250,000-$290,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Ferrari 275 GTS

1966 Ferrari 275 GTS

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monaco | May 14, 2016

Photo - RM Sotheby's

Photo – RM Sotheby’s

RM is actually offering the other 275 convertible, the NART Spyder, at this sale. That car is much rarer and more valuable (to an insane degree) than this one. This car, while related to the rest of the 275 line, looks nothing like it. The 275 GTB was built between 1964 and 1966 with Pininfarina’s 275 GTS convertible variant available during that same time period.

The car is powered by the same 3.3-liter V-12 in the twin-cam version of the 275 GTB. Horsepower is rated at 260 and the car was built specifically for the American market, though some right hand drive models were also made.

This model was intended as a followup to the 250 GT Series II Cabriolet and its styling reflects that, as it seems “older” than the rest of the 275 series. Only 200 were built and this one was sold new in Chicago for $12,400. It has had only three owners in its life (including one who affixed a trailer hitch to it at one point) and has never been restored. Even the paint is original and it displays beautifully. It should sell for between $1,875,000-$2,100,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Arrows A8

1985 Arrows A8

Offered by Coys | Monaco | May 14, 2016

Photo - Coys

Photo – Coys

Arrows Grand Prix International was founded in 1977 in England by Franco Ambrosio, Alan Rees, Jackie Oliver, Dave Wass, and Tony Southgate. They first competed in 1978 and their last race was midway in the 2002 season.

The A8 was Arrows’ car for the 1985 (and part of the 1986) season. The engine was a 1.5-liter BMW straight-four turbocharged to make, in qualifying trim, up to 1,100 horsepower. It is unclear what engine this car currently carries but it is mentioned that said engine has been rebuilt (but never driven).

Only five (or six) of these were built with this one, A8-6, being the last. This car was Thierry Boutsen’s but we can’t report as to which races it ran in or how it best finished. At any rate, it should sell for between $170,000-$205,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Bugatti Type 35

1925 Bugatti Type 35 Grand Prix

Offered by Bonhams | Monaco | May 13, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

There is so much that can be said about this car, starting with the fact that it’s one of the most iconic racing cars of its era. The Type 35 Bugatti was introduced in the latter half of 1924 and spawned multiple later variations including the Type 37.

It is powered by a 2.0-liter straight-eight producing 90 horsepower. It was sold new to someone in London, who picked the car up in France and drove it home. He quickly entered the car in various competitive events, finishing well in some of them.

The car was restored between 2007 and 2009, when an original Type 35 engine was re-installed in the car after decades of running on an Anzani engine. It was repainted to match its original color scheme and it is wearing the best wheels that a Grand Prix Bugatti possibly can. It’s a car that has been extensively used over its life, including post-restoration. Only 96 Type 35s were built, with this being 19th Grand Prix version constructed. It’s a fantastic car and should bring between $1,100,000-$1,700,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Ferrari 330 America

1963 Ferrari 330 America

Offered by Bonhams | Monaco | May 13, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

The 330 America was a Ferrari produced at a transitional time in Ferrari’s history. The brand was moving from its long-lived 250 line to the 275 and 330 lines. There was also an “America” line of cars. This is considered part of the 330 series and not part of the America series, despite its name.

In fact, the car actually shares its chassis with the earlier 250 GTE. But it has a newer, bigger engine, specifically a 4.0-liter V-12 making 300 horsepower (which was based on the engine from the 400 Superamerica, hence the name). It’s a four-seater with very pretty if not aggressive body work from Pininfarina. Top speed was 150 mph.

This was a one model year-only automobile, offered in 1963 only before being supplanted by the 330 GTC. And just 50 were built, with this being car #44. It was sold new (as a white car) in the U.S. and remained in North America until being shipped back to Europe in 1995, wearing a six-year-old coat of red paint from its restoration. A more recent restoration was carried out in 2001. As an exceptionally rare Ferrari road car, it should sell for between $330,000-$440,000. This is a Ferrari that still has some pretty good room for appreciation, a rare thing these days. Click here for more info and here for more from Bonhams.

Hispano-Suiza H6B

1930 Hispano-Suiza H6B Coupe Chauffeur by Binder

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monaco | May 14, 2016

Photo - RM Sotheby's

Photo – RM Sotheby’s

The Hispano-Suiza was a combination of the Spanish and Swiss… so it only makes sense that a number of their greatest cars were actually built by the French. Many of the models were Spanish built, but the French firm was responsible for the H6B, H6C, HS26, K6, and J12 models.

This H6B differs from the later H6C in that it has a smaller, less powerful engine and a lower top speed. It is powered by a 135 horsepower, 6.6-liter straight-six with a top speed of 85 mph. This model was available from 1919 through 1929.

The business-like Coupe Chauffeur was a car built just for that – to be chauffeured around in. The body is by French coachbuilder Henri Binder and the restoration is described as “older.” What that means I’m not sure, but the car has been in the same collection since 1962. Click here for more info and here for more from RM.

Brush Runabout

1909 Brush Model B Runabout

Offered by Auctions America | Auburn, Indiana | May 7, 2016

Photo - Auctions America

Photo – Auctions America

The Brush Motor Car Company was founded in 1907 on the basis that a light car didn’t need as much power to do things just as well as big, heavy, powerful cars. So, you know, like a Lotus.

The problem became that Brush was backed by Benjamin Briscoe’s brother. And when Briscoe went marque collecting for his United States Motor Company, he grabbed Brush. But Briscoe’s venture was doomed and Brush went down when its parent company did in 1913.

In 1909, Brush offered a Model A and a Model B. The Runabout was the only body style offered on the Model B. It is powered by a 20-ish horsepower single-cylinder engine and cost $500 when new. Everything on this car is bright red and it just looks like a museum car – which it is. It should sell for between $20,000 and $30,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

SCAT Torpedo

1914 SCAT Tipo 14-1 Torpedo by Solaro

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monaco | May 14, 2016

Photo - RM Sotheby's

Photo – RM Sotheby’s

The Ceirano Brothers were pretty big players in the early days of the Italian automobile industry. They were responsible for the birth of the following brands: Ceirano, S.T.A.R., Itala, S.P.A., Fiat (technically), and SCAT. Societa Ceirano Automobili Torino (SCAT) was founded in 1906 by Giovanni Ceirano. It lasted through 1929.

They built a solid reputation for sportiness and power: between 1911 and 1914 the company won the Targa Florio twice. This is a Model 18/30 HP and it was built between 1914 and 1916. It is powered by a 38 horsepower, 3.6-liter straight-four. The car is a Torpedo tourer with seating for five, six, or seven.

It is not original but whatever work has been done (including the paint) was done long ago. It still looks great and would likely be a lot of fun. It has serious pedigree and is from a mostly forgotten manufacturer. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Mercedes-Benz 130H

1935 Mercedes-Benz 130H

Offered by Oldtimer Galerie | Toffen, Switzerland | April 23, 2016

Photo - Oldtimer Galerie

Photo – Oldtimer Galerie

If you think of Mercedes-Benz and the 1930s, you might come up with big, beautiful cars like the the 500/540K or something even larger. But Mercedes had a full range of cars on sale, including this, the 130H.

This range represented the smallest cars available from Mercedes-Benz in the day. The 130H was offered alongside the 150H and 170H (both of which had more power) – making this the baby. It is powered by a 1.3-liter straight-four making 25 horsepower. The engine was mounted in the rear, driving the rear wheels. The suspension was such that the car rode very well, but handled extremely poorly. This is the sedan model (other body styles were also offered).

It was only produced between 1934 and 1936, with just 4,298 cars built in total. It’s a very rare model today and this one, while restored a while ago, has had recent engine service. This was a German every man’s car for the 1930s and it should bring between $35,500-$37,500. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

1925 Donnet-Zedel

1925 Donnet-Zedel Type G Saloon

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | May 11, 2016

Photo - Brightwells

Photo – Brightwells

Donnet-Zedel has an interesting history. They started life as Donnet-Denhaut and they made amphibious airplanes. So I guess the next logical step would be to produce cars. So when Francois Denhaut left the partnership with Jerome Donnet in 1919, Donnet turned around and bought Automobiles Zedel, another French company.

The company lasted through 1934 and their factory was bought by Simca. The Type G was introduced in 1925 and it is powered by a 1.1-liter straight-four making 20 horsepower.

The Type G was built in two series (G1 and G2) with this, the G1 lasting from 1925 through 1926. About 4,600 were built and only about 40 remain. Different body styles were offered and this is a two-door sedan, which, while not exotic or sporty, makes it affordable. Look for a sale price of between $13,500-$16,500. Click here for more info and here for the rest of Brightwells’ lineup.