September 2019 Auction Highlights

We’ll start this rundown with Bonhams’ Goodwood Revival sale, where the top sale during the auction was this 1935 Bugatti Type 57 Atalante Faux Cabriolet for $1,848,225.

Photo – Bonhams

The Wolverine Can-Am car we featured sold for $99,254, and the Rochdale brought $31,194. Click here for more results.

Up next we have RM’s Saragga Collection sale in Portugal. All of our feature cars sold, led by the Denzel and the HRG, which sold for $345,025 and $181,745 respectively. The overall top sale was $746,297 paid for this 1931 Bentley 8-Litre Tourer.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Other feature car sales included the Sado ($7,572), the De Tamble Roadster ($82,037), and the Willys Interlagos ($39,125). Click here for complete results.

Back to Bonhams for their inaugural “MPH” sale, which I think was a one-day online-only auction. Not really sure, as it wasn’t explained clearly on their website. The Brooke ME190 failed to sell, while the overall top sale was a tie. Both this 1993 Ford Escort RS Cosworth (below) and this 1993 Land Rover Defender 110 K13 SOV Prototype (second below) sold for $61,032 each. Full results can be found here.

Photo – Bonhams
Photo – Bonhams

The top seller at Mecum’s Louisville sale was this 1964 Ford Galaxie 500 Lightweight that brought $121,000.

Photo – Mecum

The Chrysler New Yorker we featured was withdrawn from the sale, but you can look through the rest of the results here.

Finally, we have one more from Bonhams: their Swiss supercar sale, including a bunch of cars confiscated from the son of an African dictator. Fun! Our feature feature car was the overall top sale: the Lamborghini Veneno Roadster, which sold for $8,330,076. The Lagonda Taraf failed to sell. In the spirit of over-the-top supercars, Most Interesting goes to this 2010 Lamborghini Reventon Roadster that found a new home for $1,966,823.

Photo – Bonhams

The Koenigsegg One:1 brought $4,627,820, and full results are available here.

Noble M600

2016 Noble M600 CarbonSport

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | London, U.K. | October 24, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Noble M600 breaks the rule of not featuring any cars on this site that are still in production. The M600 went on sale in 2010 and is technically still available, although the company has only sold about 30 examples thus far. But because they’re so rare, and only God knows when they’ll actually stop making it, I decided to feature it anyway.

Power comes from a twin-turbocharged 4.4-liter V8 from Yamaha that is actually based on a road-going Volvo V8. It’s capable of 650 horsepower, depending on which mode you’ve selected from the dash-operated Road/Track/Race settings menu. All that power can push the car to 60 mph in 3.0 seconds on the way to a 215 mph top speed. It’s a legitimate supercar.

The CarbonSport edition you see here features an exposed carbon fiber body that is colored maroon. This car has only delivery mileage on it and is the ninth CarbonSport car produced. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Ferrari F40

1989 Ferrari F40

Offered by Bonhams | Knokke-Heist, Belgium | October 11, 2019

Photo – Bonhams

The first Ferrari “supercar” was the 288 GTO. But let’s be honest, it looks like a 308 GTB. The F40 is truly the first balls-to-the-wall Ferrari supercar. And it’s about time we featured one.

Only 1,311 examples were produced between 1987 and 1992, and it was one of the final cars approved by Enzo himself, which is part of the reason it is so special. As time has gone on, these cars have become more appreciated, more expensive, and sadly, much less used.

Some of that is due to it being a not super-friendly road car. Power is from a rear/mid-mounted twin-turbocharged 2.9-liter V8 rated at 471 horsepower. The Pininfarina-designed body is made of composite materials and aluminum. It’s light. Sixty arrived in about four and a half seconds, and the car topped out just shy of 200 mph at 197. Unlike many of its F-car supercar brethren, there were racing versions.

This Italian-delivery example should bring between $870,000-$1,100,000 at auction. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Veneno Roadster

2014 Lamborghini Veneno Roadster

Offered by Bonhams | Cheserex, Switzerland | September 29, 2019

Photo – Bonhams

When a company like Lamborghini announces some limited-edition supercar and, at the same time, announces that all examples are already sold, do you ever wonder “who are these people that buy these cars sight unseen?” Well, the answer appears to be: corrupt politicians from Africa. It should not surprise us, ethically-speaking, that Lambo is taking this dubious cash, as Lamborghini is owned by Volkswagen. And, as we’ve learned, there aren’t a whole lot of ethics at VW HQ.

Anyway, the remarkable story of the Veneno is that it is based on the Aventador and was introduced in 2013 (really? it’s been that long already?). Only four coupes were built before the company had the sense to milk a few more customers to the tune of $4 million each for one of nine roadster examples that were to be built. This example is number seven of the nine.

The 6.5-liter V12 produces 740 horsepower, which is more than the Aventador. This one is pretty much as-new, with about 200 miles on the clock. I believe this is the first Veneno to change hands publicly. Built to celebrate Lambo’s 50th anniversary, this Veneno should bring between $5,300,000-$6,300,000. Like the Koenigsegg from last week, this car is coming from the collection of the VP of Equatorial Guinea after they were confiscated by the Swiss government. Hopefully, the money it raises finds its way back to Africa. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $8,330,067.

Koenigsegg One:1

2015 Koenigsegg One:1

Offered by Bonhams | Cheserex, Switzerland | September 29, 2019

Photo – Bonhams

Koenigsegg does this thing where they design a car and then keep iterating on it and giving each new version a distinct name. The Agera was introduced in 2011 as the successor to the CC/CCX line of cars. And the Agera kind of just looked like a development of the earlier car.

The Agera and its associated line of spin-off models lasted through 2018 and included this, the One:1, which is so-named due to its remarkable power-to-weight ratio of one metric horsepower per kilogram. The twin-turbocharged 5.0-liter V8 makes 1,341 horsepower. Only six were built between 2014 and 2016.

This particular car – as with many of the other exotics in this sale – was owned by the vice-president of Equatorial Guinea (who also happened to be the son of the sitting president). His cars were seized by the Swiss government after he was found guilty of embezzlement. He has a pretty terrible rap sheet of financial crimes and sounds like a real, great overall dude. This car cost $2,850,000 when new and now is expected to bring $1,800,000-$2,300,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale. Proceeds go toward social programs in Equatorial Guinea, where perhaps the money should’ve been spent in the first place.

Update: Sold $4,627,820.

FXX

2006 Ferrari FXX

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monterey, California | August 15-17, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Ferrari Enzo ushered in a new era of supercars when it went on sale in 2002. It spawned a new form of supercar: track-only variants. These have since given way to track-only cars from other major manufacturers. That track-only Enzo variant is this: the 2005-2007, invitation-only, FXX.

The FXX took the Enzo platform a step (or five) further. It is a hardcore track machine. The 6.3-liter V12 makes 789 horsepower. It can hit 60 in 2.7 seconds and tops out at 214 mph. The car was offered to Ferrari’s most exclusive customers. Only 29 were built initially, with a 30th produced for Michael Schumacher upon his initial F1 retirement. Eight more followed for other customers for a grand total of 38 cars.

Ferrari has since introduced an Evoluzione package that updates the FXX to a more dramatic spec. This car has not received that kit and thus remains as it was originally intended. It has only been driven once – at the Fiorano track by its current and first owner before it was delivered to his collection. You can read more about it here and see more from RM here.

Update: Sold $3,520,000.

Vector M12

1996 Vector M12

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monterey, California | August 15-17, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

This is one of my favorite cars. Ever. Jerry Wiegert lost control of Vector in the mid-1990s, and it was taken over by Megatech, an Indonesian company owned by the son of the country’s “president” (read: dictator). Megatech also owned Lamborghini between 1994 and 1998.

The M12 was based on the Vector WX-3 prototype and the Lamborghini Diablo, a corporate cousin. It shares the same 492 horsepower, 5.7-liter V12 as the Diablo. Top speed was 189 mph and 60 arrived in 4.8 seconds. The design is pure land shark – a 90s wedge with a big spoiler. These cars are impossibly wide at the rear, and remarkably spacious inside with a crease at the beltline surrounded by glass on the scissor doors.

The M12 went on sale in 1996, and Megatech sold Lamborghini to Audi in 1998. The financial situation of Megatech was, well, miserable at this point, and Vector couldn’t afford to pay for the V12s anymore. So Vector shut down. Only 14 road-going M12s were built, along with three pre-production prototypes. Two of them are local to me, which is completely insane (one of which is the first car built). The one offered here is number five. It is the only one finished in purple and is being sold from the Lingenfelter collection.

The 90s were a wild time for supercars, and none of the M12’s competitors quite encapsulate the time quite as the Vector did. It’s also one of the rarest modern-day supercars that actually saw production, even though but a handful were completed. It is ludicrous in the best way possible, and I love it. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Jaguar C-X75

2016 Jaguar C-X75

For sale at Kaaimans International | Tollerton, U.K.

Photo – Kaaimans International

Jaguar has a pretty good history with supercars. During the 1950s and 1960s, they were producing the fastest cars in the world. They did it again in the 1990s. In 2010, they partnered with the Williams F1 team to build this, the C-X75. The original concept car used four electric motors – one at each wheel – whose batteries were fed by two diesel-powered turbines.

Pretty wild stuff. The package itself is pretty exotic, with hints of the F-Type at the front end. It would’ve made for a great (traditional) hybrid supercar. They were going to build an electric version, but the economy sucked, so they didn’t.

But what they did do in 2013 before the production car’s hopes were dashed, was build a limited run of developmental prototypes. Five of them, supposedly. Here’s where it gets confusing. They built five of these development cars, right? Well, they also supplied seven of them to the makers of the James Bond film Spectre. One of those seven is said to also have been one of the five prototypes. So what are we at then, 12 cars?

The other non-prototype six were custom-built for the movie, some to be crashed, etc. They had space frame construction, spartan interiors, and were really meant just to be pretty from the outside. Both the prototypes and Bond cars were reportedly powered by turbocharged and supercharged 1.6-liter engines paired with two electric motors. That combination was good for 890 horsepower.

This car, however, has a plaque inside stating it is one of four stunt vehicles used in the movie. And the online listing states it has a 5.0-liter engine. So I really don’t know how to wrap this all up and make sense of it, other than to say it looks beautiful. If it runs and is street legal in Europe, I’m sure it’s grand (except for that workhorse concept car-like interior). At any rate, it will be too expensive for most, with the price being available upon request. Click here for more info.

XJ220

1995 Jaguar XJ220

Offered by Silverstone Auctions | Enstone, U.K. | May 11, 2019

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

This is the fourth different Jaguar XJ220 we’ve featured – and the first, plain Jane road car. It’s listed as a 1995 model, though the last XJ220 rolled off the assembly line in May 1994. So that’s believable enough. Silverstone Auctions has another XJ220 in this same sale that is titled as a 1997 – with no explanation given. Which is weird.

At 212 mph, the XJ220 was the fastest production car in the world at the time of its introduction. Power is from a 542 horsepower, twin-turbocharged 3.5-liter V6. It features an aluminum chassis and body as well as a well-appointed interior.

Celebrities lined up to buy them when they were new, but they gained a reputation for disappointment over time, and I’m not sure why. Maybe the V6 wasn’t exotic enough. The prices sort of bottomed out and never took back off again like the McLaren F1 and Ferrari F50. This one is expected to bring between $420,000-$485,000 – a relative supercar bargain.

This car is finished in Le Mans Blue and was brought to the UK in 2015 out of a collection in Malaysia. Supercar collections in Southeast Asia are always interesting, and you have to wonder what kind of stories this car could tell. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $429,230.

Italdesign Zerouno

2018 Italdesign Zerouno

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Essen, Germany | April 12, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Italdesign is a design company based in Moncalieri, Italy, near Turin. Co-founded by legendary designer Giorgetto Giugiaro in 1968, the company was mostly acquired by Lamborghini in 2010. In 2017, an offshoot was formed called Italdesign Automobili Speciali. Their mission is to actually build low-run supercars, instead of just designing them.

Their first car is this, the Zerouno, and it was launched in 2017. We’ll just say it’s related to the Lamborghini Huracan, as it is powered by a 5.2-liter V10 that makes 610 horsepower and has all-wheel drive. Top speed is 205 mph.

Only five units of the Zerouno were constructed, with this being the final one (an additional five examples of the Zerouno Duerta drop-top will also be made). It’s basically brand new with delivery mileage. This could very well be the last time you ever see one of these for sale, and it should bring between $1,050,000-$1,700,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.