Koenigsegg Special One

2010 Koenigsegg CCXR Special One

For Sale at Alain Class Motors | Dubai, U.A.E.

Photo – Alain Class Motors

Can we just state the obvious here and say that this car is just plain beautiful. I can see how some people might say that it’s garish, but supercars are supposed to be gaudy to some degree. This thing – from the design, to the beautiful blue color and carbon fiber accents, to the wheels, to the missing roof, to the big spoiler – it is just perfect. It’s almost unreal, looking more like a made up supercar from a video game than something you’d actually see on the road. But I think that’s the point.

The Koenigsegg CCX (and its derivatives) were on sale between 2006 and 2010. The CCXR was the “eco” model of the CCX. Eco is kind of misleading: it can run on E85 or “standard” 98 octane fuel. The engine is a twin-supercharged 4.7-liter V-8 that, when fueled with an ethanol blend, will pump out a ludicrous 1,018 horsepower. Top speed is listed as “in excess of 250 mph” and 60 arrives in just 3.1 seconds. Only a handful of cars ever built can attain this kind of performance.

Only 48 CCXs were built of all types. This car is a standard CCXR (not one of the two Special Edition cars) but it is a one off in its features and color and name. There is a roof should you find it necessary to drive it in the rain. It was built for a member of the royal family of Qatar but was road registered in London at one point and is now for sale in Dubai. You’ll need to inquire here for price.

Falcon F7

2012 Falcon F7

Offered by Barrett-Jackson | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 14-22, 2017

Photo - Barrett-Jackson

Photo – Barrett-Jackson

You may have never heard of the Falcon F7 or Holly, Michigan, based Falcon Motorsports, but they’ve done what a lot of start up supercar manufacturers struggle to do: actually build and sell a complete automobile. Founded by Jeff Lemke in 2009, Falcon showed the F7 for the first time at the 2012 Detroit Auto Show. That’s a pretty quick development process. It’s not a kit car either, this is a full on, hand-assembled supercar.

And, like most other start up supercar manufacturers that actually manage to get off the ground, the F7 uses parts and technology that other manufacturers have perfected. For instance, the engine is a 7.0-liter GM motor that has been fitted with a few Lingenfelter performance parts to generate 640 horsepower. That’s good enough for a sprint to 60 in 3.3 seconds and a top speed of about 190 mph.

The body is made of carbon fiber and Kevlar and they are wrapped around an aluminium and carbon fiber chassis. The thing certainly has supercar looks – and supercar rarity. As of 2015, the company has only built nine examples of the F7 (though it looks like they will still build you a new one if you want it). Total production is unlikely to ever surpass 25 units. When new, this car would’ve cost the owner about $250,000. Barrett-Jackson sold the first-ever F7 last year for $198,000. The car you see here is the second F7 built and should bring a similar amount. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $148,500.

Hennessey Venom GT

2012 Hennessey Venom GT Spyder

Offered by Barrett-Jackson | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 14-22, 2017

Photo - Barrett-Jackson

Photo – Barrett-Jackson

Supercar time! Hennessey Performance Engineering of Houston, Texas, has long been known as the premier tuner of Dodge Vipers. In 2011 they decided to start “building” cars under their own name. We say “building” because this thing looks an awful lot like a Lotus Exige, doesn’t it? That’s because Hennessey takes an Exige, stretches the chassis just long enough to shoehorn a V-8 behind the driver, and then calls it their own thing. Whether you buy that or not is up to you (we think it’s like taking a shortcut to creating a supercar). For the record, the DMV does not buy it and all of these are road-registered as Lotus Exiges.

But what you can’t ignore is what that means performance-wise. A 7.0-liter twin-turbo V-8 making 1,244 horsepower is enough to scoot anything to 200 mph. But Hennessey wanted to have the World’s Fastest Production Car. Unfortunately, Guinness says you have to build 30 examples to qualify as a “production car.” Hennessey has only built 16. Top speed for this open top variant is still an impressive insane 265 mph. Sixty arrives in about 2.7 seconds. It’s pretty quick and is technically the fastest street-legal convertible ever built.

This car was built (and is currently owned by) Aerosmith’s Steven Tyler. He ordered a Venom GT but asked Hennessey to chop the top off, and thus the Spyder version was born. Hennessey said they would only build five such cars. No word on if they ever did. The original price here was about $1,250,000. This car is selling at no reserve and is being sold for charity, so expect an inflated hammer price. No matter what you’re take is one these “cheater supercars,” you have to admit they’re still pretty cool. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $800,000.

An F1 Car for the Street

2009 Lola F1R

Offered by Bonhams | London, U.K. | December 7, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

So wait, in what world is this car street legal? The U.K., that’s what world. A little background: Lola Cars was one of the most famous constructors of race cars between 1958 and 2012. They didn’t technically build or sell this car, but it’s based on their stuff and was built by their employees.

To explain: someone (presumably with a lot of disposable income) bet the engineers at Lola that they couldn’t build a street-legal Formula One car. Race car designers aren’t people that like to say “No” to a technical challenge, so they actually ended up doing it.

It started with a Lola chassis from 1996 or 1997 and most of the body panels that came with it. The engine is a turbocharged 2.0-liter Cosworth straight-four making 370 horsepower that is driven via a five-speed manual transmission. It has lights, an increased ride height, parking brake and “fenders” over the open wheels.

The car is essentially brand new, having covered only 25 miles since its completion – probably because, as cool as it is, it is probably a little terrifying to ride between two tractor trailers while in this thing. This one-off supercar should bring between $68,000-$110,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Porsche’s First Supercar

1988 Porsche 959 Komfort

Offered by RM Auctions | Milan, Italy | November 25-27, 2016

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Porsche has been building sports cars since the tail end of the 1940s. In there, they’ve sprinkled in a variety of race cars and even an off-roader. But it wasn’t until the mid-1980s that they decided they’d get into the supercar game, which in fairness to Porsche, was really just beginning to kick off in earnest.

The 959 went on sale for the 1986 model year and was sold through 1988 (though a handful were built in 1992 and 1993 as well). It was a technological wonder upon it’s introduction. Conceived to help Porsche crush it in Group B rallying, the 959 has a traditional-for-Porsche rear-engined layout but all four wheels are powered via a ground-breaking torque-distributing 4WD system. The engine is a 2.8-liter twin-turbo flat-6 making a serious 450 horsepower.

Sixty mph was achieved in less than four seconds (remember, this was the 1980s) and the top end was 195 mph. The body was made of a complex aluminium and Kevlar mix to keep weight at a trim 3,200 pounds. This car is being offered at a huge 850-lot single-collection liquidation sale and it is one of the higher-mileage 959s you can probably find, having covered nearly 30,000 km in its life. But hey, at least someone was using it. Only 329 959s of this type were built and you can find more about it here. Click here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $1,078,560.

Carrera GT

2004 Porsche Carrera GT

Offered by Auctions America | Hilton Head, South Carolina | November 5, 2016

Photo - Auctions America

Photo – Auctions America

The Porsche Carrera GT was introduced at the 2000 Paris Motor Show (here’s the Prototype) and it went on sale in 2003 for the 2004 model year. It was the first true production Porsche supercar since the 959 (we don’t count the 911 GT1 as a “production” supercar). The run of 1,270 cars ended in 2007.

This car is powered by a 605 horsepower 5.7-liter V-10 engine – an odd choice for a Porsche automobile, a company that usually uses flat-style powerplants. Top speed is a supercar worthy 205 mph but even with that performance, these were built specifically for the street – no race variant was ever built. The Carrera GT was followed in the Porsche supercar line by the 918 Spyder.

Only 24 miles are on this car, making it, likely, the lowest-mileage Carrera GT in private hands. Delivered new to Ohio, it is still in delivery condition. It’s basically your last chance to buy a brand-new Carrera GT. It should sell for between $850,000-$950,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $800,000.

LaFerrari

2014 Ferrari LaFerrari

Offered by Bonhams | Monterey, California | August 19, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

The “Holy Trinity” of modern hypercars (the LaFerrari, the Porsche 918 Spyder, and the McLaren P1) have been around for a few years now, but the LaFerrari is the last one to start hitting the auction circuit. The other two have both sold at auctions for a while and, this weekend, there are two LaFerraris on offer (Mecum has one as well).

As poorly named as the name LaFerrari might be, the car is incredible. It’s very good looking and has performance matched by almost nothing else. The coupe was built between 2013 and 2015 with only 499 constructed. A convertible is on its way shortly.

The engine is a 6.3-liter V-12 making 789 horsepower. Ferrari, being at the forefront of Formula One, uses an F1-style KERS electric motor that can add an additional 161 horsepower. That’s a grand total of 950 horsepower. Top speed is over 217 mph.

This particular LaFerrari has only covered 230 miles, which accounts for testing, delivery mileage and only a few “for fun” miles. It’s essentially brand new and hopefully the new owner will drive it, enjoy it, and let the world see it. As incredible as it might seem, getting in on this car for the estimated $3,600,000-$4,200,000 will seem like a steal in 10 years. Click here for more info and here for more from Bonhams.

Update: Sold $3,685,000.

Aston Martin Vulcan

2016 Aston Martin Vulcan

Offered by Mecum | Monterey, California | August 20, 2016

Photo - Mecum

Photo – Mecum

We have a rule here: only feature cars that are no longer in production. This is the newest car yet featured and, while we are not completely sure if the limited run of Vulcan cars have all been built, we know for sure that only 24 will be. If Aston isn’t done building them yet, they should be soon. This is car #11.

The Vulcan is one of the most extreme cars ever built. It’s not a race car, but it’s not a road car either (it’s not street legal anywhere). It’s a track car. Like the Ferrari FXX or even the Lotus 2-Eleven – this is a car for [well-heeled] private individuals to take to their local track days. And blow everything else away.

It is powered by a naturally aspirated 7.0-liter V-12 making 820 horsepower. It’s mostly carbon fiber and weighs less than 3,000 pounds. Getting to over 200 mph is easy. It’s simply insane. Price when new (buying from Aston) was $2,300,000. But now that they are spoken for, they will probably start to increase in value. Check out more info here and more from Mecum here.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $1,800,000.

Saleen S7 Twin Turbo

2006 Saleen S7 Twin Turbo

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Plymouth, Michigan | July 30, 2016

Photo - RM Sotheby's

Photo – RM Sotheby’s

We’ve recently featured a Saleen S7 – the standard, naturally aspirated version of America’s most outlandish supercar. But what we have here is the more powerful version of Steve Saleen’s Irvine, California-built, gill-riddled, street-legal monster.

This version of the S7 is powered by a twin-turbocharged 7.0-liter Ford V-8 making 750 horsepower. That’s enough power to propel this thing to 60 mph in 2.8 seconds – all the way up to its 248 mph top speed. And it’s a legitimate car – not some thrown-together-in-a-barn sort of thing. They built these between 2005 and 2009 (the original S7 went out of production in 2006).

This car has only been driven about 300 miles since new. A recent service means it’s ready to add to that number, and rapidly. Only 13 Twin Turbo S7s were built in 2006 (and production fell off a cliff after this model year), making this is one of the final S7s built. It’s a true American supercar – and the best version of it. Click here for more info and here for more from RM.

Update: Sold $632,500.

Isdera Imperator

1984 Isdera Imperator 108i

For sale at Julien Sumner Fine Motor Cars | Guildford, England

Photo - Julien Sumner Fine Motor Cars

Photo – Julien Sumner Fine Motor Cars

We’ve been waiting for years for an Isdera to hit the market and, finally, one has. Isdera is one of the most exclusive – and reclusive – automakers in the world. Currently based in Hildesheim, Germany, the company built its first car in 1969 – a replica Ford GT40 race car. In the late 1970s, company founder Eberhard Schulz helped engineer a Mercedes concept car called the CW 311.

Mercedes never actually produced the car, but Schulz was able to take control of the project and began producing it under the Isdera marque between 1984 and 1993. This particular car is the 17th Imperator built and the first to feature a 5.0-liter Mercedes-Benz V-8 engine putting out 330 horsepower. It has supercar looks (including gullwing doors) and even though there is a Mercedes emblem up front, it is an Isdera.

Only 30 Imperator 108is were built (17 of which are “Series I” cars, of which is is apparently the last). Top speed is 176 mph and this one has done it. It’s been driven and used, which is exactly what it was meant for. Isdera recommissioned the car recently and its ready to go. They never come up for sale, so if you want one, get it now. No price is listed, so click here for more info.