Ferrari 412 T1

1994 Ferrari 412 T1

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | London, U.K. | October 24, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The 412 T1 was Ferrari’s Formula One car for the 1994 season. Mid-way through the season, the cars were heavily updated and were later dubbed 412 T1B. The 412 T2 would replace the car for 1995. Ferrari’s drivers for 1994 were Gerhard Berger and Jean Alesi, the latter of whom would be replaced for two races by Nicola Larini after Alesi had a massive testing crash.

This car is powered by a 3.5-liter V12. It is the second of eight examples built, and it was primarily used as a testing car throughout the season. Its competition history includes:

  • 1994 Brazilian Grand Prix – 3rd (with Jean Alesi)
  • 1994 Italian Grand Prix – 2nd (with Gerhard Berger)

The car has had two private owners since Ferrari sold it into public hands in 2002. It is in running order and will cross the block in London late next month. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Ferrari 250 Monza

1954 Ferrari 250 Monza by Scaglietti

Offered by Mecum | Monterey, California | August 15-17, 2019

Photo – Mecum

It’s a little amusing how much the Mecum catalog is hedging on the description of this car. It is in the catalog as “1954/1959 Ferrari 0432M.” Which is useless info. This car has a nuanced history, that’s for sure. I guess when you own the auction house you want to lay out the facts and let others draw their own conclusions – which I will now do. This car was born in 1954 as a Pinin Farina-bodied 250 Monza Spider.

Only four examples of the 250 Monza were built and they were essentially the 750 Monza with a 3.0-liter V12 instead of a 3.0-liter inline-four. Output was 260 horsepower. This particular car won the 1954 12 Hours of Hyeres with Maurice Trintignant and Luigi Piotti.

Sometime in 1956 or 1957, the car returned to Ferrari, who had it re-bodied by Scaglietti with the pontoon fender-style body you see here. The interesting bit is that this was done at approximately the same time Scaglietti was designing the 250 Testa Rossa. Maybe it’s like a proto-Testa Rossa?

In 1959, it arrived at Luigi Chinetti’s place in New York, and it was shown at the 1959 New York Auto Show. From there it’s had a few owners, including Dana Mecum who had the car restored in 2014. The catalog makes this car seem mysterious. But old cars changed bodies here and there. No big deal. It’s a factory-re-body of a 250 Monza. And it’s wonderful. I look forward to your hate mail telling me why my assumptions are wrong. Check out more info on this car here, and see more from Mecum here.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $20,000,000.

340 America Vignale Coupe

1951 Ferrari 340 America Coupe Speciale by Vignale

Offered by Bonhams | Carmel, California | August 16, 2019

Photo – Bonhams

The 340 was the first in Ferrari’s line of America cars that sort of culminated in the ultra-rare 365 California. Produced between 1950 and 1952, the 340 was intended as a grand tourer, but, being Ferraris, that didn’t stop some from being pressed into racing duty. In 1951, a 340 America won the Mille Miglia.

Power is from a 4.1-liter V12 making 220 horsepower. The engine was actually derived from Ferrari’s Grand Prix motor. Only 23 examples of the 340 America were produced, with two of those actually being cars converted from earlier 275 S models. Eleven of them were bodied by Vignale.

Five of those 11 were coupes, including this one. At a cost of $25,000 when new, the car was kept around Southern California in its early years before being acquired by the current owning family in the late 1950s. It’s remarkably untouched after 60+ years, with chipping paint and great patina. If only all old Ferraris looked this authentic. No estimate is available, but you can read more here and see more from Bonhams here.

Update: Sold $3,635,000.

Ferrari 312T

1975 Ferrari 312T

Offered by Gooding & Company | Pebble Beach, California | August 16, 2019

Photo – Gooding & Company

Well, there are few race cars more desirable than a Ferrari Formula One car. And one that won the driver’s and constructor’s championship is more or less holy grail territory. The 312T was the replacement for the 312B3 and debuted at the third race of the 1975 season.

The 3.0-liter flat-12 pumps out 500 horsepower, and five examples were built. Two of which were used by Niki Lauda during the season, while teammate Clay Regazzoni also took the helm of this chassis throughout the season. The competition history of this car consists of:

  • 1975 Spanish Grand Prix – 25th, DNF (with Lauda)
  • 1975 Belgian Grand Prix – 5th (with Regazzoni)
  • 1975 Dutch Grand Prix – 2nd (with Lauda)
  • 1975 French Grand Prix – 1st (with Lauda)
  • 1975 German Grand Prix – 3rd (with Lauda)
  • 1975 Austrian Grand Prix – 6th (with Lauda)
  • 1976 South African Grand Prix – 18th, DNF (with Regazzoni)

It was purchased by its first private owner out of Ferrari storage in 1979. It was restored by its present owner and won its class at Pebble Beach in 2017. It now should bring between $6,000,000-$8,000,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $6,000,000.

FXX

2006 Ferrari FXX

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monterey, California | August 15-17, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Ferrari Enzo ushered in a new era of supercars when it went on sale in 2002. It spawned a new form of supercar: track-only variants. These have since given way to track-only cars from other major manufacturers. That track-only Enzo variant is this: the 2005-2007, invitation-only, FXX.

The FXX took the Enzo platform a step (or five) further. It is a hardcore track machine. The 6.3-liter V12 makes 789 horsepower. It can hit 60 in 2.7 seconds and tops out at 214 mph. The car was offered to Ferrari’s most exclusive customers. Only 29 were built initially, with a 30th produced for Michael Schumacher upon his initial F1 retirement. Eight more followed for other customers for a grand total of 38 cars.

Ferrari has since introduced an Evoluzione package that updates the FXX to a more dramatic spec. This car has not received that kit and thus remains as it was originally intended. It has only been driven once – at the Fiorano track by its current and first owner before it was delivered to his collection. You can read more about it here and see more from RM here.

Update: Sold $3,520,000.

Ferrari 196 SP

1962 Ferrari 196 SP by Fantuzzi

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monterey, California | August 15-17, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

In any era of racing, manufacturers aren’t all that concerned with maintaining a chassis as “factory correct” as the intent is to win races. So race cars – be it in 1959 or 2019 – often go through rounds of development, which can include bodywork modifications and engine changes. By the time they retire from racing, they can be completely different from when they started.

And that’s what we have here. This chassis started life in 1962 as a 248 SP and later became a 268 SP after an engine change. At the end of 1962, the engine was swapped again to the current 2.0-liter V6 capable of 210 horsepower. The body is by Fantuzzi, and the competition history for this chassis (0806) includes:

  • 1962 12 Hours of Sebring – 13th, 3rd in class (as 248 SP with Buck Fulp and Peter Ryan)
  • 1962 1000km of Nurburgring – DNF (as 268 SP with Pedro and Ricardo Rodriguez)
  • 1963 Nassau Speed Week – various results (as 196 SP with Bob Grossman)

In 1972, the car was sold by Luigi Chinetti to French collector Pierre Bardinon, who sent the car to Fantuzzi for revised rear bodywork. It later spent time in the Maranello Rosso collection before being restored by its American owners in the early 2000s. It’s a pretty fantastic 1960s Ferrari sports prototype that should break the bank. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

375 MM Speciale by Ghia

1955 Ferrari 375 MM Coupe Speciale by Ghia

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monterey, California | August 15-17, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Ferrari 375 MM was a race car. The MM stood for Mille Miglia, the famed Italian road race. That’s what the 26 examples of the 375 MM were destined for, along with the Carrera Panamericana and other similar events.

But sometimes exclusive Ferrari clientele convinced Enzo that his latest race car would make their perfect road car. Such was the case with this car, which was purchased by early Ferrari fan Bob Wilke. It’s powered by a 340 horsepower, 4.5-liter V12 and was the second-to-last 375 MM built.

It carries a striking body by Ghia and was the final Ferrari bodied by that particular carrozzeria. The paint scheme is spot on and compliments the Borrani wire wheels and the overall stance of the car exceptionally well. Debuting at the 1955 Turin Motor Show, the car was retained by Wilke’s family until 1974. It was never restored but has been repainted. It’s one of RM’s “big money Ferraris” and you can read more about it here. Check out more from this sale here.

Update: Not sold.

May 2019 Auction Highlights, Pt. II

We’ll start with Historics at Brooklands, who originally had an old Maxim fire truck in their catalog that mysteriously disappeared (from the catalog). The top sale was this 1968 Aston Martin DB6 Volante that brought $787,534.

Photo – Historics at Brooklands

The awesome (and purple) TVR Cerbera we featured sold for $20,648. Mark my words: when these are eligible for U.S. importation, these prices are going to go way up. Click here for more results from this sale.

Next up is Aste Bolaffi’s sale in Milan. If you ever wanted to own a Siata (that isn’t a Spring) but didn’t want to spend a ton of money, this was the place to be. The 1500 TS we featured sold for $25,774. The biggest money was paid for this 1972 Ferrari Dino 246 GT. It sold for $369,814. Click here for complete results.

Photo – Aste Bolaffi

We move to RM Sotheby’s in Auburn, Indiana for their spring sale at that location. The top automotive lot was this 1930 Cord L-29 Convertible Phaeton Sedan for $157,300.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Hupmobile Skylark we featured sold for $15,400 and the Haynes Touring went for only $10,560, a figure that made me nauseous, as do most of the results, as there were quite a few I would’ve stepped up to buy had I been there.

Onward to Bonhams in Greenwich. The top sale was $417,500 paid for this 1949 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 Super Sport Cabriolet by Pinin Farina.

Photo – Bonhams

The Dodge Brothers touring car we featured failed to sell, but the Arnolt-MG managed to bring $64,960, and the Stutz Roadster $44,800. Full results can be found here.

Finally, we move to Artcurial’s sale on June 17. Amid a pretty tough sell-through rate, this 1965 Ferrari 275 GTB stole the show at $2,175,046.

Photo – Artcurial

Speaking of a tough sell-through rate, the Alpine A310 we featured, along with a previously-featured Hommell coupe, failed to find new owners. The good news is that the CG 1300 sold for $64,454, and the BMW Z1 brought $41,626. The rest of the results can be found here.

May 2019 Auction Highlights

We pick up where we left off last time: with Silverstone Auctions. This time it was their sale of British marques, where the Jaguar XJ220 we featured was the overall top sale at $429,230. The AC Aceca was withdrawn.

The Railton Claremont sold for $85,846, and we’ll award Most Interesting to 1952 Allard Palm Beach Mk 2 that sold for $100,153. Click here for the rest of this sale’s results.

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

Now we move on to Brightwells’ Leominster sale. No withdrawn AC cars here as this 1962 AC Greyhound took home top sale honors at $104,923.

Photo – Brightwells

The Jaguar XJS Monaco we featured previously failed to sell here again. And the Quantum 2+2 sold for $1,678. Click here for more results.

We’ll stay in the U.K. for the annual all-Aston Martin sale from Bonhams. Naturally, the one we featured (a Virage Volante) failed to find a new home. But the biggest money car of the day was $1,097,622 paid for this 1964 Aston Martin DB5. Final results can be found here.

Photo – Bonhams

Mecum’s giant Indianapolis sale was held in May. This 1967 Shelby Cobra 427 S/C brought home the bacon, selling for $2,860,000.

Photo – Mecum

The Twister Special Mustang we featured failed to sell at $180,000, and the AAR ‘Cuda brought $53,900. Click here for more results.

The RM Sotheby’s Villa Erba sale featured a couple of no-sales among the offerings we highlighted, including the Hispano-Suiza sedan and the Ferrari 330 Zagato. Another Ferrari, this 1954 500 Mondial Spider by Pinin Farina, was the top sale at $4,156,350.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The coachbuilt Alfa Romeo 4C sold for $186,434, while the Delahaye brought $320,041. More results can be found here.

330 GTC Zagato

1967 Ferrari 330 GTC by Zagato

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Villa Erba, Italy | May 25, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Okay, let’s review the line of Ferrari road cars that carried the “330” name. The 1963 330 America kicked things off and gave way to the 330 GT 2+2 the following year. The 330 GTC and 330 GTS were the final versions, and they were on sale between 1966 and 1968.

The 330 GTC was powered by a 300 horsepower, 4.0-liter V12. Both coupe and convertible variants were bodied by Pininfarina. Unless you were special. This car was delivered with such coachwork, but after sustaining damage in a 1972 accident, it was sent by Luigi Chinetti to Zagato for repairs. And this is what they came up with.

It’s the only such example built and is actually a targa, with the black section of the roof being removable. It is the only existing 330 GTC with Zagato coachwork and is one of only 598 330 GTCs produced in total. You can read more about it here and see more from RM here.

Update: Not sold.