MB 600 Pullman

1968 Mercedes-Benz 600 Pullman Limousine

Offered by Artcurial | Rueil-Malmaison, France | October 15, 2017

Photo – Artcurial

The 600 (which sported the internal Mercedes code name of W100) was the replacement for the Mercedes-Benz 300 Adenauer. Introduced in 1963, the 600 was offered through 1981, which is quite a long time as the cars sold in the 80s still sported late-60s Mercedes styling. Mercedes didn’t build a true replacement for this car until the 2015 Mercedes-Maybach S-Class (though I guess the Maybachs of the 2000s kind of count).

All 600s were powered by a 250 horsepower, 6.3-liter V-8. It pushed a lot of mass around – especially on this long-wheelbase version (the “short” wheelbase sedan was the standard model). The much-sought-after long-wheelbase Pullman Limousine that you see here seats eight and has six doors (three on each side). An even more extravagant Landaulet (which sported a convertible top for the rear passengers) was also available.

This particular car was one of three purchased by the government of the Congo. Two were sent to Africa while this one remained in Germany to be used by embassy staff. Many governments bought 600 Pullmans – in fact, it was the car to have if you were a dictator. These were the favored cars of such beloved dignitaries as Saddam Hussein, Robert Mugabe, Fidel Castro, Idi Amin, Pol Pot, Kim Jong-il, and even Pablo Escobar. Oh, the Pope had one too, I guess. Intensely restored, this car – one of just 428 LWB examples built – should bring between $475,000-$595,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Maseratis in Monterey

Maseratis in Monterey


1959 Maserati 3500 GT Spyder by Frua

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monterey, California | August 18-19, 2017

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

We did this a few years ago when there was an abundance of Maseratis on offer during the Pebble Beach auction weekend. It turns out there’s quite a few nice examples being offered this year as well. And there’s nowhere near enough time to feature them all.

This is a 3500 GT, a model produced between 1957 and 1964. It was the company’s first successful GT road car and, really, the first successful production car that Maserati launched. It’s powered by a 3.5-liter straight-six making 217 horsepower with the three Weber carburetors as configured in this car. Introduced as a coupe, coachbuilder Frua designed a single convertible to show the company that a Spyder was a good idea.

As good looking as it is, Maserati chose Vignale’s design instead and that car become the series production 3500 Spyder. That makes this a one-off – and one of only five 3500 GT chassis bodied by Frua. The current restoration was freshened in 2000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $605,000.


1956 Maserati A6G/54 Berlinetta by Zagato

Offered by Gooding & Company | Pebble Beach, California | August 18, 2017

Photo – Gooding & Company

This car looks loud… like a muffler-less, high-revving car with a heavy clutch. Sort of like a race car with a road car body. Which is kind of what it is. Maserati’s A6G/54 was a road car based on the A6GCS race car and was available between 1954 and 1956. The’re powered by a 160 horsepower, 2.0-liter straight-six.

The aggressive body here is by Zagato, one of only 21 of this model bodied by the coachbuilder. Of those 21, they are broken down by three different variations on this body style. And they were only built in ’55 and ’56. This example was raced in its day and restored recently with it debuting at the 2014 Villa d’Este. It’s rare and should bring between $4,000,000-$5,000,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Gooding & Company.

Update: Sold $4,400,000.


1968 Maserati Mistral 4000 Spyder by Frua

Offered by Bonhams | Carmel, California | August 18, 2017

Photo – Bonhams

The Mistral was a 2-door Maserati GT car that was built between 1963 and 1970. It replaced the 3500 GT and was replaced by the Ghibli. It’s the perfect 1960s Maserati tourer, a competitor to the likes of the Aston Martin DB6.

Pietro Frua designed the Coupe and the Spyder variants. The Spyders were much rarer, with only 120 built to the Coupe’s 828. There were also three engine choices offered and we’ve already featured a Mistral Spyder with the smallest engine. But the car you see here has the largest: a 4.0-liter straight-six making 265 horsepower. Only 37 of the Spyders were the 4000 model, making it the rarest version of the Mistral.

Restored to as-new condition (with the addition of a second fuel pump), this car has covered 7,000 miles since completion. It is expected to bring between $750,000-$900,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.


1964 Maserati 5000 GT Coupe by Michelotti

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monterey, California | August 18-19, 2017

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The 5000 GT was an extremely rare Maserati offered in Coupe-only form between 1959 and 1964. It wasn’t even a car the company planned on building: the Shah of Persia liked the 3500 GT but requested Maserati build him one with a modified version of the engine from the 450S race car. So Maserati capitulated, stuffing a 4.9-liter V-8 engine making 325 horsepower under the hood.

Each car was specially built by leading coachbuilders of the day. Designer Giovanni Michelotti built this example for famed American sportsman Briggs Cunningham. Cunningham requested a 5000 GT that resembled the 450S and the result was something that resembled no other 5000 GT (nor any other Maserati). It almost looks like a custom Ferrari of the era.

The restoration dates to the early-1990s. It’s pretty special, and as a one-off version of a production car that only ever saw 33 examples built, it should bring big bucks. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $1,017,500.


2007 Maserati MC12 Corsa

Offered by Mecum | Monterey, California | August 16-19, 2017

Photo – Mecum

The MC12 is the coolest Maserati of the last 25 years – easily. The car was designed around the underpinnings of the Ferrari Enzo. But unlike Ferrari, who doesn’t take their halo cars to the track, Maserati’s entire aim with this project was to return to the FIA GT Championship. Production of road cars began in 2004 and they had to homologate 50 of them to go racing, which they did by the end of 2005.

And racing they went. And it was pretty a successful endeavor – or successful enough that some customers demanded their own track version. So after the 50 road cars were built, Maserati constructed 12 “MC12 Corsa” examples that were track-only versions of their supercar. It’s powered by a 6.0-liter V-12 making 745 horsepower – pretty much the same powerplant from the factory-backed MC12 GT1 race car. These cost nearly $1.5 million when new. We’ll see what it brings in a couple of days. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $1,700,000.

Lambretta Mink

1968 Lambretta Mink Prototype

Offered by Historics at Brooklands | July 8, 2017

Photo – Historics at Brooklands

Primarily known for their scooters, Lambretta was a brand name owned by Innocenti. They operated out of Milan between 1947 (the height of scooter-mania in Italy) and 1972 (when both brands were sold to British Leyland – a death sentence).

Lambretta did try their hand at vehicles other than scooters, but their products apparently never progressed beyond three wheels. There were commercial vehicles, and this prototype microcar. This car was not built by the Lambretta factory but was constructed by the UK Lambretta importer. Production never began and this was the only example made.

Top speed of this Lambretta scooter-powered (200cc, single-cylinder) microcar is 30 mph. It’s a one-off, 4,000-mile car and it should bring between $11,500-$16,500. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $15,866.

Honda S800

1968 Honda S800 Cabriolet

Offered by Aguttes | Lyon, France | March 18, 2017

Photo – Aguttes

Honda is known for their economy cars and hatchbacks. But the second production car they ever built was a sports car, the 1963 S500. The S800 was introduced two generations later in 1966. It wouldn’t have a successor until 1999’s S2000.

The S800 was produced as a coupe and convertible and its targeted competitors included the likes of the Austin-Healey Sprite and MG Midget. It’s basically Japan’s first take on the classic English roadster. Take that Mazda Miata. The engine here is a 791cc straight-four making 78 horsepower. And it revs to almost nine grand, so it’s going to sound awesome with the top down.

Only 11,536 examples of the S800 were built between 1966 and 1970. The current owner acquired this example in the early 1990s and had it restored. The bright yellow paint looks great and the styling on this cars continues to improve with age. With less than 20,000 miles since the restoration, it’s still relatively fresh and ready to rev. It should bring between $24,000-$30,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $36,210.

Ginetta G16

1968 Ginetta G16

Offered by Silverstone Auctions | Stoneleigh Park, U.K. | February 24, 2017

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

Ginetta, which has been building sports and racing cars since 1958, has built its fair share of road cars and race cars. And some of those models blurred the lines between both categories. The G16 was an evolution of the earlier G12 model. It’s a mid-engined race car that looked every bit the part of Can-Am racing superstar.

Built between 1968 and 1969, the G16 would accept a few different engines. This car is powered by a 2.0-liter BMW straight-four that puts out around 225 horsepower. It’s perfectly suited for the historic circuit even though this particular chassis had no race history when new.

In fact, this was the final G16 chassis built (#8 of eight – which also makes it one of the rarest Ginettas). It was owned by the Walklett family (the family that founded the company in 1958) until 2014. The current owner acquired the car and finished it to what you see here. It should sell for between $110,000-$135,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

APAL Horizon

1968 APAL Horizon GT Coupe

Offered by Bonhams | Paris, France | February 9, 2017

Photo – Bonhams

APAL began as a Belgian company that built cars based on Volkswagens and Porsches, beginning in Liege in 1961. As the years went on, APAL turned more toward replicas and beach buggies, eventually relocating to Germany in 1998. They still sell kits and parts today.

Edmond Pery, the founder of APAL, understood fiberglass: how to make it and why it was great for cars. The Horizon was an original design that kind of resembles a VW Beetle-based kit car of the era… like a Bradley or something. This car is VW-powered as a 1.7-liter flat-four sits well behind the passenger compartment. It puts out an impressive 100 horsepower.

Good news for sun lovers: this car is technically a targa: the roof panel is removable and can be stowed on board. This particular example has been restored and has never been road registered, making it, essentially, a brand new car. Only 10 Horizon GT Coupes were built out of a total of about 150 APAL coupes of original design. This rarity should bring between $53,000-$74,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $31,969.

BRM P133

1968 BRM P133

Offered by Bonhams | Stuttgart, Germany | August 12, 2016-September 27, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

In modern Formula 1 it’s kind of rare for a chassis manufacturer to build its own engines. Only actual road car manufacturers that compete do it (Mercedes, Ferrari, Renault). Those teams that exist solely to compete in motorsport usually outsource their engines… but when your team name is British Racing Motors, I guess building engines is sort of your wheelhouse.

BRM was founded in 1945 by Raymond Mays and competed in F1 between 1950 and 1977. It won the constructors’ title in 1962 (this was the year that Graham Hill won the drivers’ championship).

This, the first P133 built, is powered by a 3.0-liter V-12 and has race history including:

  • 1968 South African Grand Prix – 7th (with Jackie Oliver)
  • 1968 Belgian Grand Prix – 2nd (with Pedro Rodriguez)
  • 1968 Dutch Grand Prix – 3rd (with Rodriguez)
  • 1968 German Grand Prix –  6th (with Rodriguez)
  • 1968 Canadian Grand Prix – 3rd (with Rodriguez)
  • 1968 Mexican Grand Prix – 4th (with Rodriguez)

The car is listed as being in original condition, even though it has been used in historic racing. It’s an awesome example of late-1960s F1 technology and has great looks to match. It should bring between $340,000-$450,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

De Tomaso Vallelunga

1968 De Tomaso Vallelunga Coupe

Offered by Bonhams | Monaco | May 13, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Alejandro De Tomaso’s little car company – that lasted an impressive 40+ years – built a number of cars over the years, most famously the Pantera. But a decade before the Pantera debuted, De Tomaso introduced their first road car, the Vallelunga (named after a race track near Rome).

Built between 1964 and 1968, the Vallelunga is powered by a rear-mid-mounted Ford 1.5-liter straight-four making 104 horsepower. The body, built by Ghia, is fiberglass and the whole car only weighs 1,600 lbs.

This particular car had an extensive restoration that was completed prior to the 2004 show season. 50 road cars were built (along with three prototypes and five racing cars). It’s quite rare and should bring between $360,000-$410,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Bonhams in Monaco.

Update: Not sold.

Porsche 908 Coupe

1968 Porsche 908 Coupe

Offered by Gooding & Company | Amelia Island, Florida | March 11, 2016

Photo - Gooding & Company

Photo – Gooding & Company

The Porsche 908 was actually a series of race cars that the company produced between 1968 and 1971. We’ve already featured three variations: the 908/2 Longtail Spyder, the 908/03 Spyder, and a 908/03 Spyder Turbo. They all look different. For instance: this one has a top.

So the 907 was built in 1967 and to take advantage of a rule in the FIA book, Porsche adapted their flat-eight engine to 3.0-liters (in this car, putting out 350 horsepower) and the body was just sort of the natural next step from the 907. The first batch of cars were closed coupes to make outright speed. In total, 31 908s were built with five Coupes remaining. The factory competition history for this car (chassis no. 11) includes:

  • 1968 1000km Spa – 3rd (with Hans Herrmann and Rolf Stommelen)
  • 1968 6 Hours of Watkins Glen – 27th, DNF (with George Follmer and Joe Buzzetta)
  • 1968 500km Zeltweg – 13th, DQ (with Jochen Neerpasch and Rudi Lins)

After those three races, Porsche was quickly on to other styles of the 908 and its successive siblings. This car went to a privateer in Switzerland who used it in hillclimbs (which sounds like an awesome amount of overkill). It was wrecked slightly in 1974 and later repaired. In the last 10 years this car has seen use in historic racing and many shows. If you’ve been hunting for a true, usable factory Porsche racer, look no further. It should bring between $3,000,000-$3,300,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

’68 Hemi Charger

1968 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi

Offered by Russo & Steele | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 27-31, 2016

Photo - Russo & Steele

Photo – Russo & Steele

There’s three generations of classic Hemi Dodge Chargers that are really collectible. First is the 1966-1967 model. Then came this one. And finally, the 1971-1974 model. This is the most famous body style of the original Dodge Chargers. It is the one that Bo and Luke Duke tore around in.

This is a Hemi, meaning it is powered by a 7.0-liter V-8 rated at 425 horsepower. This is also an R/T car, meaning is has the “road and track package” which adds dual exhaust and heavy duty brakes, among other things (including the standard 440 engine or the optional Hemi).

This car has a rare 4-speed transmission and is the only such example with this color paint, which is actually quite nice. It’s been exceptionally restored. Only 467 1968 Chargers were equipped with the 426 Hemi and this is one of the nicest. Click here for more info and here for more from Russo & Steele.

Update: Sold $242,000.