Sunbeam-Talbot 4-Litre

1939 Sunbeam-Talbot 4-Litre Sports Saloon

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | October 23-28, 2021

Photo – Brightwells

Sunbeam-Talbot was a short-lived marque and part of the myriad of Talbot-branded cars over the decades. The brand came into being in 1935 when Rootes merged Sunbeam and Talbot into a single marque. In 1954, after dealing with confusion in relation to the French Talbots, Rootes dropped the name and Sunbeam soldiered on alone.

The 4-Litre model was introduced in 1939 and was made in very limited numbers into 1940. This was the company’s largest model and was derived from the Humber Super Snipe. It’s powered by a 4.1-liter inline-six that made 100 horsepower. It topped out at 85 mph.

WWII cut short the 4-Litre’s production run, and only 229 were built. Just 44 of those were Sports Saloons. This example was restored in 1991 and is one of two Sports Saloon 4-Litres known to exist. It should sell for between $39,000-$44,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

AC 2-Litre

1948 AC 2-Litre Saloon

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | October 23, 2021

Photo – Brightwells

AC’s 2-Litre was their first post-war automobile, and it was really the largest shot at a “mainstream” automobile that they ever took. Pretty much everything after this was pure sports car. The 2-Litre, which was sold from 1947-1956, was available as a two- or four-door sedan. Drophead coupes were also offered. The Buckland was the open roadster variant.

The 2.0-liter inline-six dated to 1922 but was fitted with triple SU carburetors for post-war use and a factory-rated output of 74 horsepower. Top speed was 80 mph. Only 1,284 examples were produced of all types combined.

This car has been in the same family since new and was restored in the 1980s. It now carries an estimate of $8,200-$11,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Durant Rugby

1925 Rugby Model F Tourer

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | October 28, 2021

Photo – Brightwells

Billy Durant’s second automobile empire after GM was Durant Motors. It only lasted for a decade, from 1921 through 1931, but he did manage to assemble a small contingent of brands, including Durant, Flint, Mason, and Star. He even expanded overseas.

But the Star name was already in use in the U.K. So Durant rebranded his Star cars as the Rugby for the British Commonwealth. It was a relative success. About 70,000 Model Fs were churned out under the various Durant brands across all markets. This car is powered by a 2.0-liter inline-four that was rated at 35 horsepower when new.

The great thing about Stars is that they are very inexpensive today, even for a nice one, which this looks to be. The pre-sale estimate is only $10,000-$11,500. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Sunbeam Alpine Mk I

1954 Sunbeam Alpine Mk I

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | September 16, 2021

1954 Sunbeam Alpine Mk I

The first Alpine was sort of a sporty two-door roadster version of the Sunbeam-Talbot 90 sedan. It was introduced in 1953, and a Mk III version was also produced before production wrapped in 1955. No, there was not a Mk II. The Alpine was reintroduced in 1959, and the V8 version of that car would be known as the Tiger.

This Mk I is powered by a 2.3-liter inline-four that produced 97 horsepower when new. The bodies were by Thrupp & Maberly, and just 1,582 were produced between the Mk I and III (1,192 were Mk I). Of that grand total, 961 were exported to North America.

This example has been restored since 2006 and now carries a pre-sale estimate of $59,000-$63,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $59,077.

Jowett Javelin

1951 Jowett Javelin DeLuxe

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | September 16, 2021

Photo – Brightwells

Jowett was founded in 1906 and made it through WWII. Unfortunately, a post-war boom for new cars in the U.K. saw Jowett’s body builder get bought out by Ford, leaving them without a source for car bodies. So they said “aw the hell with it” and closed up shop.

Despite its looks, the Jupiter was actually their large car, and it was offered between 1947 and 1953. The car is powered by a 1.5-liter flat-four mounted directly behind the grille in front of the radiator. It produced 52 horsepower in this car, which was enough to get it to 80 mph.

The weird engine location meant that this was a roomy six-seater car, and the DeLuxe trim added bigger bumpers, a fog light, leather seats, and a wooden dashboard. This four-owner example is one of 23,307 built and should sell for between $12,000-$15,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $10,455.

Alvis TD 21 Saloon

1961 Alvis TD 21 Saloon

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | June 19-23, 2021

Photo – Brightwells

Post-war two-door Alvis cars are very attractive. The TD/E/F range were all good-looking cars. The TD was produced in two series between 1958 and 1963, and this Series I car features two-door saloon coachwork. A drophead coupe version was also available.

This car features a 120-horsepower, 3.0-liter inline-six and a four-speed manual transmission, the latter of which was sourced from Austin-Healey. Top speed was about 103 mph.

There were 784 examples of the Series I TD 21 produced, but I have no info to present on the breakout between coupes/saloons versus convertibles. Common sense would say that the saloon was more popular, but the drophead coupes seem to pop up for sale more often. This one carries an estimate of $15,000-$20,000. Bidding ends tomorrow. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold (I think?) $10,021.

Reliant Scimitar 4×4

1972 Reliant Scimitar GTE Ferguson 4×4 Prototype

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | June 23, 2021

Photo – Brightwells

The Reliant (and later, Middlebridge) Scimitar GTE was a two-door shooting brake wagon/sports car. Initially – in 1964 – there was a two-door Scimitar coupe, but that evolved into the GTE wagon-ish sort of thing in 1968. Production of various models continued through 1990. They were all front-engine and rear-wheel drive.

Except for this one. It still has the same fiberglass body as other Scimitars, but it also has a four-wheel-drive system from FF Developments, a company that worked with developing such systems, including for a Formula One car (via its predecessor company, Ferguson Research).

Power is from a 3.0-liter Ford V6. This car remained with FF Developments until one of the engineers working on it managed to buy it. From there it passed to another owner, eventually ending up in the Jaguar Land Rover collection, cars from which were sold a few years ago (including this one). The current owner bought it then and has brought the thing back to life. It’s now selling at no reserve. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $23,498.

MG RV8

1995 MG RV8

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | May 8, 2021

Photo – Brightwells

As time went on, MG became more and more of a shadow of its former self. By the time the 1990s rolled around, there wasn’t much gas left in the tank. The MGB had ceased production in 1980. After that, the company only sold badge-engineered versions of cars like the Austin Metro.

MG had started building MGB bodies again in the late 1980s to serve the restoration market. Then the Mazda Miata launched and gave MG the idea that light two-seat sports cars were still viable. In late 1992, they launched the RV8, which was basically an MGB with a 3.9-liter Rover V8, a revised front end, a limited-slip differential, and a slightly tweaked suspension.

Please recall that the original MGB launched in 1962. The RV8 still has rear drum brakes. Between late 1992 and 1995, MG churned out 1,938 examples of the 190-horsepower roadster. Most of them went to Japan, including this one. I like this car because it is interesting. It’s a footnote in the history of British sports cars, but it’s also the last hurrah of the MG sports car. It should sell for between $25,000-$30,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $25,489.

Armstrong-Siddeley Hurricane

1948 Armstrong-Siddeley Hurricane 16

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster U.K. | March 27-April 1, 2021

Photo – Brightwells

Armstrong-Siddeley, which I guess never officially had a hyphen but I’m hyphenating anyway because that’s how I did it last time, was founded via a merger in 1919 and existed as a motorcar manufacturer until 1960.

The Hurricane drophead coupe was launched alongside the Lancaster sedan at the end of WWII. The Hurricane remained in production until 1953 in two different forms. This, the 16, is the less-powerful of the two. It’s equipped with a 2.0-liter inline-six that was rated at 70 horsepower when new. There was a larger Hurricane 18 model with a 2.3-liter six as well.

Combined production between the two engine options was just 2,606, all of which convertibles. It was the first Armstrong-Siddeley with an independent front suspension and was boded in-house, unlike the Lancaster. The pre-sale estimate is $15,000-$18,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $17,195.

Mitsuoka Viewt

1998 Mitsuoka Viewt 2-Door

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | March 17-April 1, 2021

Photo – Brightwells

“I want a Jaguar Mark II but I don’t want it to be an unreliable nightmare. Also, I want it to be a hatchback and look like a crappy hatchback, from the side.” Well then do I have the car for you. The Viewt is the car that put Mitsuoka on the map. It’s basically a re-worked Nissan Micra (or March) that is supposed to look like a Jaguar Mark II from the front.

This first-gen example is based on the 1992-2003 K11 generation of the Nissan Micra. Most Viewts were four-door sedans, but it looks like someone convinced them to tack their front end on a hatchback. Power is from a 1.0-liter inline-four that produced 54 horsepower when new.

The Viewt is technically still in production but on an updated Nissan platform. Over 12,000 have been produced thus far, a very small percentage of which I believe to be two-doors. This relatively low-mile example should sell for between $4,000-$7,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $2,235.