Haynes Roadster

1921 Haynes Model 47 Special Roadster

Offered by Bonhams | Amelia Island, Florida | May 20, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

When Elwood Haynes removed the Apperson name from his company, he took one of America’s pioneering automotive names out on its own. The company lasted as “Haynes” from 1905 into 1925. By the time the ’20s rolled around, Haynes attempted to move upmarket. Like way upmarket.

The first 12-cylinder Haynes arrived in 1916, and the company had been offering Vanderbilt Cup-style speedsters since 1907. In 1921, they offered the Model 47 “Light Six” and the Model 48 “Light Twelve.” This Model 47 is powered by a 4.7-liter inline-six that puts out about 70 horsepower.

It’s a sporty car, and Haynes knew it. They aimed it squarely at the Mercer Raceabout and priced it accordingly: about $3,500 when new. Driver Howdy Wilcox would test a 1922 road car model at Indianapolis and hit almost 80 mph. I think that this means that this car qualifies as “usable.” It should sell for between $75,000-$100,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Bandini 1100 Sport

1951 Bandini 1100 Sport

Offered by Historics Auctioneers | Ascot, U.K. | May 15, 2021

Photo – Historics Auctioneers

Bandini Automobili was a small boutique automaker based in Forli, Italy, between 1946 and 1992. It was founded by Ilario Bandini and was not associated with Ferrari F1 driver Lorenzo Bandini. The company’s cars were produced mainly for racing, with their Siluros taking multiple SCCA championships in the 1950s.

Bandini cars were also seen at the Mille Miglia, Formula 3, world endurance races, and more. The 1100 was produced between 1947 and 1950, mainly with Motto-sourced sports car bodies. The 1.1-liter inline-four engine was sourced from Fiat and modified with a twin-cam head from Alfa Romeo. Horsepower was rated at 65.

This car carries an open-wheel-style body and was restored in 2017. Just 46 Bandinis are known to exist, and this one should fetch between $105,000-$130,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Locomobile Model H

1907 Locomobile Model H Touring

Offered by Bonhams | Amelia Island, Florida | May 20, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

Locomobile was one of America’s premier automakers before WWI. And this was the type of vehicle that they excelled at: a big, powerful, touring car. The Model H was produced from 1905 through 1907 and was only available as a limousine or a touring car.

Power is from by a 35-horsepower, 5.7-liter inline-four. This car would’ve cost approximately $4,500 when new – the price of a house in most of America. The Model H was the larger of the two 1907 models, the 90-horsepower Special race car notwithstanding.

This car was purchased by Henry Austin Clark Jr. in the 1940s and remained in his collection until it (the collection) was broken up in the 1980s. During Clark’s ownership, it wore a pickup truck body and was the go-to vehicle for members of his staff. The body it wears now is an authentic period body that was mounted circa 1990.

Only one Model H Locomobile survives – this one. And the pickup body is included in the sale. The pre-sale estimate is $160,000-$200,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Bombardier B-7

1940 Bombardier B-7 Snowmobile

Offered by Bonhams | Amelia Island, Florida | May 20, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

Joseph-Armand Bombardier invented the snowmobile in the 1930s. This model was the first such creation. It was a hit, and the Bombardier business blossomed and would eventually produce trains, jets, and off-road vehicles.

The B-7 was the first snowmobile. It seated seven passengers, and this one is powered by a 3.6-liter Ford flathead V8 rated at 90 horsepower. It has tracks out back and skis up front. Twelve were sold in the first year – 1937. They moved more than 100 in 1939.

This one spent time on duty at a ski resort before it came to its current museum home. A restoration was performed at some point, and it’s now going under the hammer with an estimate of $30,000-$40,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Evante Mk I

1988 Evante Mk I

Offered by Historics Auctioneers | Ascot, U.K. | May 15, 2021

Photo – Historics Auctioneers

Evante Cars Ltd was founded by George Walter Robinson in Spalding, England, in 1987 as an offshoot of Vegantune, a restorer of Lotus Elans. Vegantune found opportunities for improving the Elan, thus the formation of Evante to build a “modern” Elan.

The Evante roughly shares the Elan’s looks and is bodied in fiberglass over a tubular steel spaceframe chassis. This car is powered by a Ford-based 1.7-liter inline-four rated at 170 horsepower. The cars were built to order at a time when the global economy was in a recession. So it didn’t go great.

Production stopped in 1991, and the rights to the design passed between a few other companies over the years, with an Evante Mk II appearing later on in the 1990s. This Vegantune-era example carries a pre-sale estimate of $16,000-$22,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Stutz Bearcat

1912 Stutz Bearcat

Offered by Bonhams | Amelia Island, Florida | May 20, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

Harry C. Stutz’s Indianapolis-based company produced their first cars in 1911. The following year they cemented their legacy with this, the Bearcat. Stutz continued to use the name on sporty models into the 1930s. But it was this, the original “Bear Cat”, that Stutz is most well-known for.

The 1912 Series A was offered in five body styles, and the Bearcat cost $2,000 when new. Not cheap. It’s got a low-slung frame, minimal bodywork, two seats, and a 60-horsepower, 6.4-liter Wisconsin inline-four. It was the first sports car.

This particular Bearcat is the oldest known Stutz car in existence. It was restored most recently in 2007-2008 and is expected to bring between $650,000-$850,000, which seems like a steal as this is one of America’s all-time great cars. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Lanchester Straight Eight

1932 Lanchester 30HP Straight Eight

Offered by Historics Auctioneers | Ascot, U.K. | May 15, 2021

Photo – Historics Auctioneers

The Lanchester Motor Company was founded in 1899 by the three Lanchester brothers: George, Frederick, and Frank. They sold their first cars in 1901, and the company was acquired by BSA in 1931. The last cars were produced in 1955, and the brand name was acquired by Jaguar in 1960 and has remained with the Jag through its various acquisitions.

The 30HP Straight Eight was designed by George Lanchester and was sold between 1929 and 1932. Power is from a 4.4-liter SOHC inline-eight rated at 30 taxable horsepower. As we all know, 1929 was a poor year to launch a high-end new car (see Duesenberg; also see Lanchester’s subsequent 1931 takeover by BSA).

Only 126 examples of the Straight Eight were built. This one was re-bodied in the 1960s in its current style and is one of the final examples produced. The pre-sale estimate is $97,000-$111,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

MG RV8

1995 MG RV8

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | May 8, 2021

Photo – Brightwells

As time went on, MG became more and more of a shadow of its former self. By the time the 1990s rolled around, there wasn’t much gas left in the tank. The MGB had ceased production in 1980. After that, the company only sold badge-engineered versions of cars like the Austin Metro.

MG had started building MGB bodies again in the late 1980s to serve the restoration market. Then the Mazda Miata launched and gave MG the idea that light two-seat sports cars were still viable. In late 1992, they launched the RV8, which was basically an MGB with a 3.9-liter Rover V8, a revised front end, a limited-slip differential, and a slightly tweaked suspension.

Please recall that the original MGB launched in 1962. The RV8 still has rear drum brakes. Between late 1992 and 1995, MG churned out 1,938 examples of the 190-horsepower roadster. Most of them went to Japan, including this one. I like this car because it is interesting. It’s a footnote in the history of British sports cars, but it’s also the last hurrah of the MG sports car. It should sell for between $25,000-$30,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Queen Model E

1905 Queen Model E Touring

Offered by Bonhams | Amelia Island, Florida | May 20, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

C.H. Blomstrom’s Queen was produced between 1904 and 1906 and was relatively successful. In all, about 1,500 cars were sold, but the company came under fire for being “defectively incorporated.” So Blomstrom merged his company with another, cashed out his stock, and opened another car company somewhere else in Detroit.

But the Queen’s legacy stood. Singles, twins, and four-cylinder cars were offered. The singles were among the most powerful of their kind, and the twins rivaled Packard with their output. The Model E was sold in 1905 and 1906 and features a 3.2-liter (presumably flat) twin that made approximately 16 horsepower. The E could only be had as a tourer like this.

This example was restored prior to being shown at Pebble Beach in 2005. It is the only Model E known to exist and is expected to sell for between $75,000-$100,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Chenowth Indianapolis

1961 Chenowth-Chevrolet Indianapolis

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Amelia Island, Florida | May 22, 2021

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Once upon a time, there was a company called San Diego Steel Products, and they made exhaust headers. It was owned by a guy named Chuck Chenowth, and he wanted to go racing at Indianapolis. He built an Indy roadster and stuffed a 4.2-liter Chevrolet V8 up front in an era when an Offenhauser-powered Anything dominated each race. Bold move.

It’s got Hillborn fuel injection and a Lehman front-drive unit to operate the fuel and water pumps as well as an Offenhauser gearbox and Halibrand wheels. The body was actually designed by Don Kuzma, another legendary name of the period. The Chenowth name is still around, although primarily associated with off-road racing today.

Unfortunately, this car never made a 500. It failed to arrive for the 1960 race and failed to qualify in 1961. It was more successful on the USAC short-track circuit, where it was driven by the likes of Tom Sneva, Mike Magill, and Greg Weld. It was restored near Cincinnati in the 1980s and is now offered with an estimate of $175,000-$225,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.