July 2017 Auction Highlights

July was a lull in the auction world between a packed June and an always-huge August. We start this with H&H Classics at the Imperial War Museum. The top seller at this sale was this 1929 Bugatti Type 44 Saloon by Vanvooren that brought $258,555.

Photo – H&H Classics

The Adams Roadster we featured sold, bringing $22,900 (you can see all of the results here). And we’ll stay in the U.K. for the first half of Silverstone Auctions’ two-parter, the Classic Race Car Sale. The Tojeiro-JAP failed to meet it’s reserve, but the top sale was this $295,492 1990 Lancia Delta HF Integrale Works Rally Car. Click here for complete results.

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

Next up, Mecum’s Harrisburg sale. A previously-featured Stutz failed to sell at this auction. The top sale was this 1970 Plymouth Hemi Superbird for $415,000.

Photo – Mecum

The Hertz Rent-a-Racer Shelby we featured sold for $120,000. Complete results can be found here.

Let’s jump back to June to cover Russo & Steele’s Newport Beach auction. The top sale there was $292,600 for this 2006 Ford GT.

Photo – Russo & Steele

The Fiat 1200 TV we featured failed to sell. Check here for more results.

Here we go… the first of the Pebble Beach sales: Bonhams in Carmel. The top sale, as predicted, was the single-owner McLaren F1 we featured that ended up bringing an astonishing $15,620,000. The 1904 Premier we featured blasted past its estimate, selling for $341,000. A couple of no-sales included the Maserati Mistral, Ferrari 312 F1 car, the Lotus Indy car and a previously-featured 1904 Humber.

We’ll give Most Interesting to this 1957 BMW 503 Cabriolet by Bertone that we really wanted to feature but ran out of time. It sold for $583,000.

Photo – Bonhams

A rare model of Horch we featured a long time ago while it was for sale at a dealership sold at this auction for $102,300. Click here for more from Bonhams.

Veyrons.

2008 Bugatti Veyron 16.4

Offered by Mecum | Monterey, California | August 16-19, 2017

Photo – Mecum

Mecum is hitting a supercar home run this year in Monterey. To wit: they have not one but two Bugatti Veyrons in their catalog (and from what I can tell, that catalog has not yet been finalized). When the Veyron went on sale in 2005, it ushered in a whole new era of the hypercar.

It’s basically just a rocket sled you are allowed to drive on the streets: super fast, fairly heavy, not so nimble. The engine is an 8.0-liter, quad-turbocharged W-16 that makes 987 horsepower. That’s enough to power this all-wheel drive machine to 60 mph in 2.6 seconds on the way to a top speed of 253 mph – which was faster than anything else when introduced. There have been some other pretenders to the World’s Fastest Car throne, but this one is an actual production car, with 450 built between the coupes and convertibles.

This is one of the 300 original coupes the company built between 2005 and 2011, when Coupe production ended (some of those 300 were the “Super Sport” model with more power). Price when new on these was well over $1 million, which is where the price is pretty much guaranteed to remain. See more about this car here and more from Mecum here.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $900,000.


2015 Bugatti Veyron Grand Sport Vitesse

Offered by Mecum | Monterey, California | August 16-19, 2017

Photo – Mecum

This is a slightly sexier Veyron than the base model. Actually, this was sort of the magnum opus of the entire Veyron line. Basically, Bugatti built the base Veyron from 2005-2011, and the Veyron Grand Sport (the convertible) from 2009-2015. They offered a hopped-up coupe (the Super Sport) from 2010-2011 and this, the Grand Sport Vitesse (a convertible with the more powerful Super Sport engine) from 2011-2015. This is one of the last Grand Sport Vitesses brought to the U.S. They also built a bunch of special editions and one-offs as part of these models.

The engine is the same: an 8.0-liter quad-turbocharged W-16, but in Super Sport (or Vitesse) trim, it makes 1,184 horsepower. While the Super Sport could hit 258 mph, you have to settle for 254 in this open-top version. Toupee or not, that kind of wind will suck your hair right off (to be fair, once you remove the top the car is electronically limited to a downright wimpy 229 mph).

Only 150 Grand Sports were built of all types. This one has an awesome color combo of matte black and orange. It’ll bring big bucks – more than the base coupe. Click here for more info and here for the rest of Mecum’s lineup.

Update: Sold $2,350,000.

June 2017 Auction Highlights, Pt. II

We’re back with more from June, starting with H&H Classics’ second June sale, this one held at Woodcote Park. The top seller was this 1966 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage, featuring the world’s tallest antenna, which brought $317,992.

Photo – H&H Classics

The Tojeiro-Climax we featured failed to meet its reserve. More results can be found here.

We move across the Channel to Osenat’s June sale. The Tracta we featured brought big money ($786,394) – but it wasn’t enough to dethrone this 1939 Bugatti Type 57C Cabriolet by Gangloff from the top of the sale sheet. It brought $1,414,979.

Photo – Osenat

Both of our other feature cars sold, with the other Bugatti in the sale bringing $321,130 and the Turcat-Mery $120,423. Click here for complete results.

Back to the U.K. for Brightwells’ Modern Classics sale. We weren’t able to feature anything from this sale, but the top sale was $97,257 for this 1995 Porsche 911 Turbo. More results from Brightwells can be found on their site here.

Photo – Brightwells

Next up: Barrett-Jackson’s “Northeast” sale. The top sale here was a basically brand new 2017 Ferrari 488 Spider that sold for $434,500 – which was definitely not a great deal for the buyer, as you can buy one of these off the lot for less (even with the same options). Someone got caught up in the auction fervor…

Photo – Barrett-Jackson

The Tiffany neo-classic we featured brought $13,200. You can see the rest of the results here.

Finally, we have Auctions America on the West Coast in Santa Monica. The top sale was this 1960 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster that sold for $1,100,000.

Photo – Auctions America

The Ferrari 599 GTO we featured failed to sell, but the Duesenberg brought $880,000. And the spacey Tatra 603 sold for $41,800. Click here for complete results.

June 2017 Auction Highlights, Pt. I

We kick of June’s results with one from May, RM Sotheby’s in Villa Erba, Italy. The top sale was the Talbot-Lago Teardrop Coupe we featured. It sold for $3,757,824. The Talbot-Lago T26 we featured was also a million dollar seller, bringing $1,252,608. Would-be million dollar sales that failed to hit their reserves included the McLaren P1 GTR and a previously-featured, Pebble Beach-winning Mercedes-Benz 680 Torpedo Roadster. We’ll give Most Interesting to this 1935 Bugatti Type 57 Atalante Prototype that brought $3,382,041.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Our other four feature cars all sold, with the WRE-Maserati leading the way at $814,195. The Aston Martin V8 Vantage Zagato brought $513,569 and the Lancia Delta S4 Stradale a similar $551,147. The other Lancia we featured came in at $313,152. Click here for all of the results from this sale.

H&H Classics is holding two sales in June, the first of which was at the National Motorcycle Museum. The Rover we featured sold for $7,464. As is seemingly always the case, the top seller at this H&H sale was an E-Type, specifically a 1971 Jaguar E-Type Series III Coupe for $67,456. Click here for more results.

Photo – H&H Classics

Now we move to Bonhams Greenwich sale where two of our feature cars failed to sell: the Rickenbacker and Pierce-Arrow. The Rambler we featured sold for $73,700. The Bugatti was a strong seller, bringing $676,000, but it wasn’t enough to be the top sale, which went to this 1990 Ferrari F40 for $877,250 (which, compared the recent F40 prices, was kind of a steal). Complete results can be found here.

Photo – Bonhams

Next up, Aguttes in Lyon. The top sale was this 1993 Mercedes-Benz E60 AMG that brought an impressive $156,885.

Photo – Aguttes

The Venturi we featured failed to sell. Check out complete results here.

Finally: Mecum in Portland. The top sale was this 1968 Chevrolet Camaro Yenko for $395,000.

Photo – Mecum

The Plymouth Savoy we featured failed to sell. Mecum’s site has the rest of the results.

Bugatti Brescia Modifie

1923 Bugatti Type 23 Brescia Modifie Torpedo by Lavocat et Marsaud

Offered by Bonhams | Chichester, England | June 30, 2017

Photo – Bonhams

Bugatti Brescias are so tiny. They’re like pocket-sized exotics. The “Brescia” name was applied to post-WWI Bugatti Type 13s. The Type 13 entered production in 1910 and went on hiatus for the First World War. Post-war, it soldiered on through 1926.

In 1920, Bugatti debuted the Type 23 Brescia, which had a longer-wheelbase. It’s powered by a 1.5-liter straight-four that made enough power to propel this car to approximately 70 mph (!). The body is a racy torpedo from coachbuilders Lavocat et Marsaud. It’s such a tiny car that the two seats contained within are offset, so the passenger sits slightly behind the driver.

Remarkably, this car retains its original bodywork and most of its original components, something that not many Brescias do (mostly because many of the Type 23 cars were later shortened to Type 13 configuration). The third (and most recent) restoration was completed in 2010. Only about 200 of these were built and only 19 are known to remain, with this being among the most original. It should bring between $710,000-$840,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Bugatti 44 Berline

1930 Bugatti Type 44 Berline by Alin & Liautard

Offered by Osenat | Fontainebleau, France | June 18, 2017

Photo – Osenat

Most of Bugatti models are all part of a line of cars that trace back to an earlier model. In this case, the Type 44 can trace its heritage back to the Type 30 of 1922. The Type 44 was built between 1927 and 1930 and was the most popular series of all of the “8-cylinder line” of 1922-1934.

It’s powered by a 3.0-liter straight-eight making 80 horsepower. This car was sold new in Paris and was sent to Alin & Liautard to be bodied as a sedan, a body style not many Bugattis still exist as. The large roof has a big piece of fabric that can be rolled back like a giant cloth sunroof.

Ownership is known back to the 1950s, but it is known that the car was registered in Pairs up until that point. Any restoration this car has ever underwent is extremely old and predates the current owner who acquired the car some time ago. The Type 44 was one of the most popular Bugattis sold, with production totaling 1,095 cars. This one should sell for between $200,000-$260,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $321,130.

Bugatti 46 by Weymann

1930 Bugatti Type 46 Sportsman’s Saloon by Weymann

Offered by Bonhams | Chichester, England | June 30, 2017

Photo – Bonhams

In 1929, Bugatti introduced a new road car dubbed the Type 46. It would spawn a very rare supercharged variant the following year (the Type 46S) and a short-wheelbase cousin called the Type 50. The Type 50B was the only racing version of the Type 46 family. Production on the Type 46 ended in 1936.

These cars are powered by a 5.4-liter straight-eight making 140 horsepower. It was a pretty large and heavy chassis at 138 inches (eight inches longer than a modern Chevy Suburban), so it’s no wonder Bugatti chose the short wheelbase version for the race car.

This car was one of 35 Bugatti chassis ordered by its London distributor and was bodied in the U.K. by Weymann. It’s history goes back to new but the current family has owned it for 42 years. The Type 46 was a popular Bugatti, with 400 built. This one should bring between $210,000-$260,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

S/N # 46219

Update: Sold $365,332.

Bugatti Type 49 Roadster

1932 Bugatti Type 49 Roadster by Labourdette

Offered by Bonhams | Greenwich, Connecticut | June 4, 2017

Photo – Bonhams

In 1922, Bugatti introduced the eight-cylinder Type 30. It would evolve through a number of other models, all eight-cylinder cars, that culminated in the 1930-1934 Type 49. This model is considered to be one of the finest of Ettore’s creations, with a decade of development used to really perfect it.

The Type 49 is powered by a 3.3-liter straight-eight making 85 horsepower. The body is by Labourdette, one of the oldest French coachbuilders of its day. It’s sleek and simple, with a rear-mounted spare that is inset into the body, making the car appear quite aerodynamic when viewed from behind.

The first few owners of this car were all French, but in the 1970s it was exported to the U.K. It arrived in the U.S. in 1983 by way of Japan and the current owner acquired it in 1995. Restored over a number of years, it is fresh, pretty, and ready for showing and going. Bugatti built 470 examples of the Type 49 and just 76 are thought to exist. This one has not been bestowed with a pre-sale estimate, so bring a blank check. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $676,500.

May 2017 Auction Highlights, Pt. I

Starting off our recap of May’s auction activity we have Brightwells’ second April sale, Modern Classic Cars and Motorcycles. We featured a Lotus Excel that sold for a reasonable $7,818. The top seller off an overall low sell-through rate was this 1982 Mercedes-Benz 280SL for $15,636. Click here to see the rest of what sold.

Photo – Brightwells

Next, we have one of two Osenat sales held in May. Two feature cars failed to sell, the Roamer and the Lorraine-Dietrich. The top sale was this 1927 Bugatti Type 40 that sold for $380,346.

Photo – Osenat

The Talbot sedan we featured brought $24,263 and you can see the rest of Osenat’s results here.

Bonhams has a pair of sales in May as well, the first being their Aston Martin sale. The V8 Vantage Zagato we featured failed to sell, but the top sale was this 1964 Aston Martin DB5 for $721,955. Click here for more Astons.

Photo – Bonhams

We’ll keep it in the U.K. for Silverstone Auctions’ May Sale. We featured a Farbio GTS, but it failed to meet its reserve. The #1 sale at this auction was this 1993 Porsche 911 Turbo S “Leichtbau” for an impressive $717,756. Those Porsche prices don’t quit! Click here for more from Silverstone Auctions.

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

Finally, for this post, Auctions America’s Auburn Spring sale. Top sale honors went to this 2012 Ferrari 458 GTD Race Car for $462,000.

Photo – Auctions America

The Buick Hellcat tank we featured was near the top, selling for $247,500. There were a couple other military vehicles that we’ve featured before that went across the block in Auburn again. Leading the way was this White Half-Track for $82,500. Next came the GMC “Duck” for $49,500. And finally, this tracked Opel rocket launcher for $41,500.

The two other feature cars both sold for decent sums with the Cunningham Hearse bringing $137,500 and the HPD ARX $110,000. Click here for complete results, including some absolute bargains that prove Auctions America is still a hidden enough gem that makes it a buyer’s paradise.

Bugatti 57S

1937 Bugatti Type 57S Cabriolet by Vanvooren

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Amelia Island, Florida | March 10-11, 2017

Photo – RM Sotheby’s

Some of the highest-dollar Bugattis come from the Type 57 family of cars that was produced by the firm between 1934 and 1940. In 1936 they introduced a few updated versions of the model, among them the Type 57S – a lowered variant that gave the car a sportier stance.

It’s powered by a 3.3-liter straight-eight making 170 horsepower. The 57S was successful on the European racing circuit and about half of the cars were bodied by the factory. There were 22 chassis that were unsold by mid-1938, when the 57S was killed off. Most of these ended up in coachbuilders’ hands and this car is one of four Vanvooren Cabriolets built in Paris (three of which are known to still exist).

This car has known ownership history since new and was on long term display. RM has brought the car back to being a runner and driver, but it’s not quite ready for long distance trips. Only 42 Type 57S chassis were built and this is, again, one of just three Vanvooren Cabriolets remaining. It’s a matching-numbers, unrestored car (though it has had certain mechanical elements rebuilt for functional purposes). It’s fantastic. Click here for more info and here for more from RM in Amelia Island.

Update: Sold $7,700,000.