1914 Overland

1914 Overland Model 79TE Touring

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Hershey, Pennsylvania | October 5-6, 2022

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Model 79 was one of two products sold by Overland in 1914, the other was the Model 46. The Model 79 was offered in three body styles: a roadster, coupe or touring, the latter of which cost $950 when new.

Power is provided by a 35-horsepower inline-four. This one was sold new in Wyoming to a sheep rancher. In 1914, cars had been on sale for a bit, approximately 14 years. Yet, this was the first car for the family of its first owner. Makes you wonder when the last hold outs finally converted to automobiles.

Touring cars from this era are just great, and this one is no exception. It’s actually being sold by the family of its first owner – and at no reserve. Click here for more info.

Thomas Flyabout

1914 Thomas Flyer Model K 6-90 Flyabout

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Hershey, Pennsylvania | October 5-6, 2022

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

E.R. Thomas‘s automobile company got off to a modest start in 1902. But it only took about five years for them to make quite a name for themselves by winning the 1908 New York to Paris Race with an ’07 Model 35.

Their cars were some of the nicest you could buy in the U.S. prior to WWI. The Model K 6-70 was introduced in 1908 and featured a 140″ wheelbase and a preposterous 12.8-liter inline-six. That car made 70 horsepower. If that was not enough, you could order, as a factory option, an increased cylinder bore that would up the displacement and also the power – to 88 horsepower.

Thomas actually ran out of money in 1912, and after that they sold the Model K chassis for truck use, which is how this car was initially configured. Used as a fire truck by a few cities, it was eventually spotted and purchased by Bill Harrah in 1959. It would be one of nine Thomas cars he owned (including the New York-Paris race winner). It wasn’t until its next owner in the 1980s that the car was rebodied in Flyabout fashion.

Only about 500 Model K 6-70/90 cars were built in total, and only 10 are known to exist. This one has an interesting history, which you can read more about here.

Haynes Model 27

1914 Haynes Model 27 Touring

Offered by Gooding & Company | Pebble Beach, California | August 19-20, 2022

Photo – Gooding & Company

Elwood Haynes was a pioneer in the American automotive industry, having built one of the earliest cars in the country and having designed the first American car that could be mass produced. In 1904, he parted ways with the Apperson brothers and set out on his own.

The Haynes Automobile Company last until 1925, and in 1914, the company’s range consisted of three models. The Model 27 was the largest, powered by a 50-horsepower, 7.7-liter inline-six. Three body styles were offered, including this seven-passenger tourer, which is believed to be one of two Model 27 tourers to survive.

This example remained in the family of the original owner until the 1980s and remained in Iowa until 2007. It later won a preservation class award at Pebble Beach and is now being sold at no reserve with an estimate of $100,000-$130,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $112,000.

Bugatti Type 22

1914 Bugatti Type 22 Torpedo by Chauvet

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monterey, California | August 18-20, 2022

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

This car looks like a toy. From pretty much every angle, too. The body is by Carrosserie Chauvet, a coachbuilder that was active in the north of France from 1912 until 1929. This is their only surviving body on a Bugatti. It’s a small boattail torpedo with two tiny seats up front and maybe more seating under a hard tonneau behind a second cowl? Hard to say. The photos really leave a lot to the imagination.

The top looks like it would get ripped off of this thing at about 20 mph. Which is probably a good cruising speed here, as the car is powered by a bright red, Ettore Bugatti-signatured 1.4-liter inline-four that made about 30 horsepower.

The Type 22 was a road car, and they were built from 1913 through about 1922. Production totals are not widely known, but it was not many. And even less are left. This one has an estimate of $200,000-$250,000. Read more about it here.

Update: Sold $335,000.

Kelly-Springfield Truck

1914 Kelly-Springfield Model K-40 3-Ton

Offered by Mecum | East Moline, Illinois | March 25, 2022

Photo – Mecum

Kelly-Springfield Motor Truck Company sounds an awful lot like the Kelly-Springfield Tire Company. And that’s probably because both were founded in Springfield, Ohio, by Edwin S. Kelly. The trucks were sold under the Kelly marque from 1910 through 1912, when Springfield was appended.

Kelly actually started his truck company in 1910, 15 years after selling his tire company, after having purchased the Frayer Miller Auto Company. The K-40 was their biggest offering, launching alongside the smaller K-31 and K-35 in 1912.

This K-30 is a bare-chassis example powered by a 6.8-liter T-head inline-four of the company’s own design. It’s got chain drive and was a well-regarded truck when new. You can see more about it here.

Update: Withdrawn.

Selden Truck

1914 Selden Model J Covered Flair

Offered by Mecum | East Moline, Illinois | March 24, 2022

Photo – Mecum

George Selden invented the automobile. Or at least that’s what his patent lawyer would have you believe. A businessman, Selden was the first person to patent the automobile (in 1895), and he received royalties on every car sold in America until the whole patent ordeal was thrown out in 1911, thanks in no small part to Henry Ford.

The Selden Motor Vehicle Company was not one of America’s largest at any point. Selden’s major income stream was patent royalties. Passenger cars were sold from 1909-1912, and trucks remained available through the early 1930s.

Not many still exist. This truck is powered by a Continental inline-four that drives the rear axle via dual chains. This is a big, heavy, slow truck typical of the era, including the solid rubber tires. You can read more about it here and see more from this sale here.

Update: Sold $38,500.

Le Zebre Type C

1914 Le Zebre Type C

Offered by Bonhams | Bicester, U.K | July 25, 2020

Photo – Bonhams

Julius Solomon and Jacques Bizet met while working at Georges Richard and left to start their own company, Le Zebre. They launched their first car in 1909, the Type A. It was followed by the Type B and C in 1912.

The six-horsepower Type C would last through 1918, a year longer than the B. The replacement sub-one-liter inline-four in this car has been fitted with an electric starter and has been drained of fluids. This Type C will require a little work before it gets back on the road.

Le Zebre lasted through 1931, and their relatively diminutive cars do come up for sale here and there. But they are by no means common. This one should bring between $15,000-$17,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $12,503.

Chalmers Touring

1914 Chalmers Model 24 Touring

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Phoenix, Arizona | January 16-17, 2020

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

I think Chalmers has one of the most interesting histories of any defunct auto manufacturer. Its roots trace back to the Buffalo Automobile Company, which became Thomas, then Thomas-Detroit, then Chalmers-Detroit, then Chalmers. Chalmers would later merge into Maxwell, which is now Chrysler. A more detailed history can be viewed here.

The 1914 Chalmers model line consisted of the Model 19 and Model 24. This is an example of the larger model, which is powered by a 60 horsepower inline-six. Six different bodies were offered on this chassis, which was produced as the Model 24 only in 1914. This tourer would’ve cost its first owner $2,175.

This example has been active on the historic circuit since the 1950s, which says a lot about its usability. It is being offered without reserve. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $61,600.

Metz Roadster

1914 Metz Model 22 Roadster

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Hershey, Pennsylvania | October 10-11, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Charles Metz originally founded the Waltham Manufacturing Company, producer of the Orient Buckboard. He left it in 1901 and returned in 1908 when it was financially destroyed. Essentially what was left was a huge pile of debt and a huge pile of parts. So he started selling the parts for $25 a pack. Fourteen “packs” later and you’d have an entire car, unbuilt, at your home.

But if you spaced it out right, the next pack would arrive just as the prior one was put together. It was like buying a car on an installment plan. But you had to build it yourself. It was one of the first kit cars. Mail-order at that.

After the “Metz Plan” paid off Waltham’s debts, Metz reorganized as the Metz Company in 1909 and upped the price a bit. It was a popular car and lasted through 1921.

The Model 22 was the only model offered in 1914 and could be had as a Roadster, Speedster, or Torpedo. This Roadster cost $475 and is powered by a 22 horsepower inline-four. It features a friction transmission and chain drive.

It’s kind of weird to think someone assembled this car in their garage. Over 100 years ago. And yet here it is, ready to go. It should sell for between $20,000-$30,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $24,200.

Two Cars in Hershey

1914 Jeffrey Six Model 96 Five-Passenger Touring

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Hershey, Pennsylvania | October 10-11, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Jeffrey was kind of an important marque. It was founded by Thomas B. Jeffrey and his son Charles. They started by building the Rambler, but after Thomas died, Charles changed the name to Jeffrey. In 1917, the company was sold to Charles Nash (after Charles survived the Lusitania sinking), and the name changed again. Nash eventually merged into AMC, which is now part of Chrysler… which is now part of Fiat. So this is just like an old Fiat.

Jeffrey cars were only sold between 1914 and 1917. Three models were offered in 1914 and the Six was the largest. It is powered by a 48 horsepower inline-six. Over 10,000 Jeffreys were sold in 1914, and this one should bring between $30,000-$50,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $52,250.


1909 Enger Model B High-Wheel Runabout

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Hershey, Pennsylvania | October 10-11, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Frank J. Enger set up shop in Cincinnati in 1909 to build high-wheelers. More traditional touring cars followed in 1910, but the company folded in 1917 after Frank’s suicide in his office. This high-wheeler is from the first year of production.

The Enger high-wheeler was actually a normal car but with big wheels. It’s pretty much the original donk. Three models were offered that year, and the Model B was the least expensive at $1,600. It’s powered by a 14 horsepower flat-twin. This one should bring between $15,000-$25,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale. Also, I really want this car.

Update: Sold $45,100.