Bugatti Type 46 Faux Cabriolet

1930 Bugatti Type 46 Faux Cabriolet by Veth & Zoon

Offered by Mecum | Las Vegas, Nevada | November 17, 2018

Photo – Mecum

“Convertibles are cool and I want to be cool but I don’t want to be outside,” said someone who ordered a Faux Cabriolet body for a Bugatti. This is a Type 46, one of the most “common” and often-seen Bugatti models. It was built between 1929 and 1936.

Power comes from a 5.4-liter straight-eight that made 140 horsepower. A rare supercharged version, the Type 46S, was offered beginning in 1930. This car carries coachwork from Dutch coachbuilders Veth & Zoon. In all, about 444 examples of the Type 46 were built.

This car was delivered new to the Netherlands, thus the locally-built body. It was restored in the 2000s and looks amazing, if understated, from the outside. I almost made the lead image a shot of the engine, because it’s a work of art. Mecum estimates this car is worth somewhere between $1,150,000-$1,250,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Talbot-Lago T120 by Brandone

1938 Talbot-Lago T120 Roadster by Brandone

Offered by Mecum | Las Vegas, Nevada | November 15-17, 2018

Photo – Mecum

As the name would suggest, the Talbot-Lago T120 was the baby brother of the marque’s legendary T150. Just because it wasn’t as large, expensive, or powerful, doesn’t mean they didn’t have the ability to be just as beautiful.

The T120 is powered by a 90 horsepower, 3.0-liter straight-six and was introduced in 1934. This car carries bodywork from Carrosserie Brandone and it is believed to be the only such body fitted to a T120 chassis.

It has known history back to the 1960s when it was discovered in storage in Saint-Tropez. It was restored decades ago and has been a part of the Academy of Art University Collection for some time. It is expected to sell for between $1,050,000-$1,150,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum in Vegas.

Duesenberg J-204

1930 Duesenberg Model J Dual Cowl Phaeton

Offered by Mecum | Las Vegas, Nevada | November 17, 2018

Photo – Mecum

When the Model J Duesenberg was introduced in 1929 it caused quite a splash. I wonder what it must have been like to see one on the show stand and say “I want one” only to realize that the company would only sell you an engine and chassis for the price of a good-sized house.

You were responsible for taking it somewhere to have a body fitted. This car originally carried a Rollston Town Car body. By the 1950s that had been replaced with a Brunn Convertible Victoria. Whoever restored it in the 1970s built this La Grande-style Dual Cowl Phaeton. So this is not original coachwork, but it looks quite nice in lavender and lilac.

Power is from a 6.9-liter straight-eight making 265 horsepower. It was the king of the road and has a 150 mph speedometer. That speed might sound crazy for a road car designed in the 1920s, but it wasn’t too far from the truth. This is yet another classic coming from the Academy of Art University collection. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum.

Black High-Wheeler

1908 Black Surrey

Offered by Mecum | Las Vegas, Nevada | November 15-17, 2018

Photo – Mecum

The Black Manufacturing Company of Chicago had a short but interesting life. Their first cars went on sale in 1908 and they were all high-wheelers. But they sold them under two different brands. There was the budget-minded Chicago Motor Buggy and the slightly nicer but still built-for-rough-conditions Black. The Chicago Motor Buggy was only available in 1908 and 1909.

The 1908 Black lineup consisted of four models, three of which were Surreys. There was the Type 18, Type 118, and Type 20. I have no idea which version this is, but I do know the engine should be a 20 horsepower, 2-cylinder and it would’ve cost somewhere between $575 and $650.

The Black would be available through 1910, but the company also sold a more traditional car under the Black Crow marque in 1909 and 1910. It was a licensed version of the Crow-Elkhart. The high-wheeler example above has only been owned by two families since new and is a pretty rare early American automobile. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Duesenberg J-546

1932 Duesenberg Model J Torpedo Berline by Rollston

Offered by Mecum | Las Vegas, Nevada | November 15-17, 2018

Photo – Mecum

Rollston was a coachbuilder based in New York City between 1921 and 1938. It was founded by Harry Lonschein, Sam Blotkin, and Julius Veghso. So what’s with the name? Well Lonschein was a former Brewster employee, a company strongly associated with Rolls-Royce of America. So he named his new company after Rolls-Royce. Fun fact.

This Model J is powered by a 6.9-liter straight-eight engine that makes 265 horsepower. A 3-speed manual transmission sends power rearward, and this car wears a one-off convertible sedan body by Rollston. It was restored in the 1990s.

This car has known ownership history from new, as it was purchased new by a member of the Vanderbilt family. Other owners included Dean Kruse from 1998 to 2007, John O’Quinn from 2007 until 2010, and the Academy of Art University Collection since 2010. It’s an immaculately-clean example and should bring about a million bucks. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Comuta-Car

1979 Comuta-Car

Offered by Mecum | Chicago, Illinois | October 25-27, 2018

Photo – Mecum

The Sebring-Vanguard CitiCar was an electric microcar built between 1974 and 1977. This tiny wedged-shaped, bug-eyed thing was available in some very 1970s colors. About 2,300 were built. Hilariously, the company billed themselves as America’s sixth-largest automobile manufacturer, which was technically true.

The design was purchased by Commuter Vehicles Inc. in 1979. This new company built pretty much the same car, but badged as the Comuta-Car, with a Comuta-Van variant available as well (but mostly for the Postal Service). Production lasted through 1982 and some kits may have been sold after that. By then, 2,144 Comuta-Cars had been built.

This example is fitted with a 12 horsepower electric motor that runs on four batteries. It has a terrifying 50-mph speedometer and a plastic body. It will sell at no reserve, so go get it. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

October 2018 Auction Highlights

Before we hop into October, we’ll finish off September. First, with Silverstone Auctions’ aptly-named September Sale. We featured a special edition Lambo that brought $205,616. And guess what? It was the overall top sale. We’ll give Most Interesting to this 2000 Lotus 340R that brought $88,121. Click here for full results.

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

Next, Bonhams’ Zoute Sale where this 1962 Aston Martin DB4 Series V Vantage was the top sale at $1,290,110. The Derby we featured failed to sell and the early Elva brought $165,398. Click here for complete results.

Photo – Bonhams

We didn’t get to feature anything from Mecum’s Dallas sale, but this 2017 Ford GT was the top sale at $1,320,000. This was the second time this particular GT has sold publicly in the last three months. It brought less this time than last. Four of the top 10 cars were variations of the Ford GT. Other results can be found here.

Photo – Mecum

Onward to RM in Hershey where our featured Post War convertibles both sold with the Playboy bringing $132,000 and the Monarch $60,500. The overall top sale was $495,000 for this 1930 Cadillac V-16 Roadster by Fleetwood.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Electric car sales included the Milburn for $63,250 and the Baker at $192,500, while the touring cars both sold as well: the American Eagle went for $242,000 and the Everitt $55,000. The 1905 Northern sold for $52,250, the Buick truck $30,800, and a previously-featured Packard went for $71,500. A previously-featured Delahaye failed to sell. Complete results can be found here.

And finally, we backtrack to the final sale of September, Aguttes’ sale at Montlhery. The Matra we featured didn’t sell, but the 1959 AC Aceca Wide-Track Prototype we wanted to feature (but didn’t because, well, the photo below was the only one provided). It brought $252,689. Click here for all results.

Photo – Aguttes

Rickenbacker Brougham

1926 Rickenbacker Model E6 Coach Brougham

Offered by Mecum | Chicago, Illinois | October 25-27, 2018

Photo – Mecum

Eddie Rickenbacker really had little to do with this brand of car, other than lending his name and image. In fact, the people behind it were also behind earlier failures such as E-M-F, Everitt, the Flanders 20, and so on. The trio of Barney Everitt, William Metzger, and Walter Flanders took one financial beating after another and always came back for more.

Rickenbacker was famous for being the first non-luxury car to offer four-wheel brakes. That may seem insane, but cars in general have always been a development-in-process since day one. The first Rickenbackers went on sale in 1922 and this 1926 model features a 3.9-liter, 60 horsepower straight-six engine, and a 3-speed transmission.

Eddie Rickenbacker resigned from the company the year this example was built and the company closed in 1927. It is estimated that 5,400 cars were made in 1926 alone, split between six and eight-cylinder models. This Coach Brougham would’ve cost $1,895 in 1926, but you’ll have to check back to see what it brings in 2018. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

September 2018 Auction Highlights

We’re picking up with Worldwide Auctioneers in Auburn, Indiana, where the Ford GT Prototype we featured was the top sale at $467,500. The other two prototypes we featured both sold at no reserve with the Ford Ghia bringing $1,650 and the Seagrave $11,000. Most Interesting goes to this 2014 WaterCar Panther that sold for $88,000.

Photo – Worldwide Auctioneers

A previously-featured Ford Thunderbird Concept Car sold here for $25,300, a long way from its original asking price. More results can be found here.

We move on to RM Sotheby’s in London. A low sell-through rate saw two of our feature cars, the Maserati Barchetta and De Tomaso Guara, fail to sell. The top sale was $2,550,296 paid for this 2003 Ferrari Enzo.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Sbarro Espera sold for $10,401. Complete results can be found here.

Next up is Brightwells’ Modern Classics sale. We didn’t get to feature anything, but this 2001 Land Rover Defender 90 Tomb Raider Edition was the top sale at $18,477. Click here for more results.

Photo – Brightwells

Bonhams held their Goodwood Revival sale in September. The Bristol 404 Coupe we featured failed to sell (as did the rest of an interesting collection of Bristols), but the Jaguar XJR-11 brought big money: $1,542,582. The biggest money of the whole day was for this 1964 Shelby Cobra 289 Competition at $1,760,176

Photo – Bonhams

The Rolls-Royce State Landaulette failed to sell, otherwise it probably would’ve taken top sale honors. Click here for more results.

The top seller at Mecum’s Louisville sale was this 2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon that sold for $132,000. All results from this sale can be found here.

Photo – Mecum

August 2018 Auction Highlights, Pt. II

Picking up in Monterey with Mecum, we have three Duesenbergs, two of which sold. J-262 brought $1,155,000 and the other two were previously-featured cars. J-386 brought $3,850,000 (which turned out to be the overall top seller) and J-255 failed to sell. Excitingly, Alexander Rossi’s Indy 500-winning car sold for $1,127,500. On a related note, Most Interesting goes to this 1957 Kurtis Kraft 500G “Bardahl Special” that sold for $258,500.

Photo – Mecum

The Alpine Edition Diablo brought $253,000. Cars that failed to meet their reserve included the Lamborghini Murcielago, Ferrari F12tdf, the Sang Noir Veyron, Lamborghini Centenario, Porsche 550A, and a previously-featured Locomobile, and Porsche GT3.

We move on now to Russo & Steele in Monterey where they sold John Cena’s 2017 Ford GT for $1,540,000.

Photo – Russo & Steele

The GSM Dart that we featured from their Newport Beach sale (and failed to sell there) also failed to sell here. Click here for more results.

Finally from Monterey we have Worldwide Auctioneers. The top sale was $1,320,000 for the Duesenberg Convertible Sedan we featured. The Tourster brought $775,500. Most Interesting goes to this 1916 Locomobile Model 38 Collapsible Cabriolet that sold for $473,000. Click here for final results.

Photo – Worldwide Auctioneers

Off to the fun that is Auburn, Indiana, in the fall. RM Sotheby’s is where we’ll start and top money went to this 1957 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster for $852,500. The Duesenberg we featured wasn’t far behind, selling for $737,000.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Going through the results of this sale every year makes me sick to my stomach. This year there were at least a dozen cars that are things I would love to have (and can actually afford!) and failed to purchase because I didn’t make the trip to Auburn. Such deals would’ve included the Maxwell we featured that brought just $13,200. Similarly, the 1920 Buick went for $14,300, the Cole $28,600, and the White $29,700. A previously-featured Terraplane failed to sell and complete results can be found here.

Held the same weekend as the previous sale, Bonhams had an auction across the pond in Beaulieu. The top reported sale here (there was a pre-war Bentley that they aren’t reporting the sale price on) was $283,001 paid for this 1935 AC 2-Litre 16/80HP Competition ‘Slab-Tank’ Sports.

Photo – Bonhams

Among our feature cars, a previously-featured Marendaz led the way at $111,710. Four of the five old cars we featured sold, the exception being the Paige-Detroit. The Corre brought the biggest money at $40,215. The Phoenix blew past its estimate, selling for $32,768, the Reo sold for $23,831, and the Alldays & Onions brought $33,513. Click here for more from Bonhams.