Abarth Monomille

1963 Fiat-Abarth Monomille GT Coupe

Offered by Bonhams | Padua, Italy | October 28, 2017

Photo – Bonhams

The Fiat-Abarth 750 was a tiny sports car manufactured by Abarth beginning in the late 1950s. The famous Zagato “Double Bubble” variant is highly sought after today. Thanks to that car’s success, in late 1960, Abarth shoved a larger engine in their Fiat 600-based car and the Monomille was born.

Early Scorpione cars carried bodies by Beccaris and this, a later GT version, sports a fastback body by Sibona & Basano. The engine is a 1.0-liter straight-four that was tuned in the 1990s to 80-ish horsepower (up from the original 60). These cars were expensive when new, costing nearly a third more than a Porsche 356.

This pricing model might explain why the Monomille is so rare today. This car, whose restoration was completed three years ago, is one of four GT models that still exist. It should bring between $110,000-$140,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $120,111.

Savoy Max Wedge

1963 Plymouth Savoy Max Wedge

Offered by Mecum | Portland, Oregon | June 16-17, 2017

Photo – Mecum

We’ve featured some of Mopar’s Max Wedge cars in the past and here is another one. The Max Wedge was the pre-Hemi, a 426 cubic inch monster and Chrysler stuffed it into a bunch of family cars to produce some of the best sleepers of the era. In this case, the 7.0-liter V-8 makes 415 horsepower.

The Savoy was produced between 1954 and 1964 in the U.S. and the final generation (1962-1964) was the smallest of Plymouth’s three full-size offerings. It could be had as a two-door coupe, four-door sedan, or four-door wagon. This particular car is not known to have been raced in period, but many were.

It’s mostly original, too, with just 16,000 miles on the odometer – but it has been repainted. Only 18 two-door Max Wedge Savoys were built in 1963. It’s not the most collectible big-engined Mopar, but it’s definitely one of the rarest. It should bring about $150,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $175,000.

Fiat 750 Vignale

1963 Fiat 750 Vignale Coupe

Offered by Coys | London, England | May 18, 2017

Photo – Coys

Fiat never built a car called the “750” but they did build one called the 600. Produced from 1955 through 1969, it was visually similar to the classic 500, but with a larger engine. There was also the van-like Multipla version, which was the basis for some wild designs. The normal 600 was also used as the basis for some cool coachbuilt cars. Fun fact, there was a version of the 600 called the “750” – but it was only produced by Zastava in Yugoslavia.

Vignale took the sort of tiny, round 600 and enlarged the engine to 750cc. In this guise, the straight-four probably made more power than the original 633cc engine. The body is the star here, though. It’s very stylish, sort of a mini-coupe that doesn’t resemble the base car at all. Vignale also built a two-door sedan and a convertible.

As far as production numbers go, there may have been as many as 40,000 750 Vignales built. That seems like quite a few, but then again Fiat built 2,695,197 600s in total, so it’s kind of a drop in the bucket. This one shows nice and it is completely usable. It should bring between $13,000-$15,500. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Meyers Manx

1963 Meyers Manx

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Amelia Island, Florida | March 10, 2017

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

We all know that the 60s were a weird time. But that creativity that persisted throughout America brought us some cool stuff. And So-Cal surfer Bruce Meyers brought us this: the Dune Buggy.

Meyers was an artist, engineer, and even has some experience building sailboats. So he took the ubiquitous-in-California-in-1964 Volkswagen Beetle and ripped the body off it. Replacing it with an open-top fiberglass shell and big, off-road tires, it looked every bit the part of an off-road racer. He started selling kits in 1964 but they were expensive and he only found 12 takers.

Then he set up a real business and the Manx took off. This one is powered by a 1.8-liter VW flat-four (it was originally a 1.6). Production lasted through 1971 when tax problems forced the company to close. At the dawn of the new millennium, Meyers got back into business and you can still buy a Manx kit today. The original run saw about 6,000 made (from 1965-1971). This one is titled as a ’63 because that’s the year of the VW underneath it.

There are a lot of Beetle-based dune buggies out there, but a true Meyers Manx is a rare find. This has to be one of the nicest, being fresh off a $44,000 restoration. Buy it and tear around the beaches – just like Steve McQueen in The Thomas Crown Affair. It’ll sell at no reserve and bring someone a lot of fun. Click here for more info and here for more from RM.

Update: Sold $68,750.

Impala Z11

1963 Chevrolet Impala Z11

Offered by Mecum | Kissimmee, Florida | January 14, 2017

Photo – Mecum

The third generation of the Chevrolet Impala was built between 1961 and 1964. It was Chevy’s full-size model – the largest car they offered in 1963. The Impala was made iconic by the Beach Boys and their song “409” which referenced the largest engine available in these cars.

Well, until 1963 anyway. The Z11 was a rare option code that could be applied and it came with a 7.0-liter V-8. The 427 put out 430 horsepower and as you can see it doesn’t look much different than your aunt’s Impala two-door hardtop. It was the ultimate sleeper, with a higher power rating than what Chrysler would slap on their Hemi years later. The 427 was based on the 409, but bigger and better. Top speed was 120 mph.

This three owner Z11 is one of just 57 built, as 1963 was the only year this option was available. Only two were built in green, with this being one of those. A comprehensive restoration was completed, which included installing a correct Z11 engine (the car was probably raced in 1963 and was sold to its second owner with a 409 under the hood). It is expected to bring between $375,000-$450,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $250,000.

Five Rare Mopars

Five Rare Mopars

Offered by Mecum | Kissimmee, Florida | January 6-15, 2017


1962 Dodge Dart 330 Max Wedge

Photo – Mecum

The second-generation of the Dodge Dart was downsized from a full-size car to a mid-size car. This generation was only built for 1962 before moving to a compact platform in 1963. Three trim levels were available: the base Dart, the mid-trim Dart 330, and the top-trim Dart 440.

1962 also happened to be the year that Chrysler released an engine dubbed the Max Wedge – a 6.8-liter V-8 making 410 horsepower. It was designed to make their cars monsters at the drag strip and in the early 1960s, American automakers were perfectly happy to build low-volume versions of their high-volume family cars to dominate the ¼-mile.

This two-door sedan – likely the only body style you could get this engine – has been fully restored and is an authentic Max Wedge car. Production numbers are hard to come by, but about 25,500 ’62 Dart 330s were built (total of all five body styles) and there were approximately 13,500 Two-Door Sedans built across all Dart trim levels. The closest estimate I have to the number of Max Wedge Darts is 210. This one should bring between $85,000-$110,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.


1963 Dodge 330 Max Wedge

Photo – Mecum

The “330” was a trim line introduced by Dodge in 1962 and in 1963, they separated it off and it became its own model. Between 1963 and 1964 it was a full size Dodge before it was replaced by the Dodge 880 for 1965.

1963 was a good year for the Max Wedge as it was virtually unbeatable at the drag strip. The 7.0-liter V-8 put out 425 horsepower and was geared to go a quarter of mile at a time. This example has been beautifully restored and it is one of about 64,100 330s built in 1963. Of those, only 162 were fitted with this engine and this one should bring between $90,000-$120,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum.

Update: Sold $70,000.


1963 Dodge Polara 500 Max Wedge

Photo – Mecum

The Dodge Polara was a full-size Dodge and the second generation of the car was built between 1962 and 1964. For 1963, the Polara was available in two trim levels, the base Polara and the performance model dubbed the “500.” The Polara was essentially the same as the ’63 Dodge 440 except that it had backup lights. The 500 trim level added a base V-8, bucket seats and more interior niceties.

So what we have here is a 7.0-liter, 425 horsepower V-8 shoehorned into a well-appointed luxury two-door sedan. It was built as a customer order and never raced. It shows 36,000 miles and is one of about 39,800 Polaras produced in 1963. Of those, about 7,300 were Polara 500s and only five of those have the Max Wedge engine. This rarity will bring between $85,000-$115,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.


1964 Dodge 440 Max Wedge Lightweight

Photo – Mecum

The 440 was a trim-line on the 1962 Dodge Dart and for 1963 and 1964 it became its own full-size Dodge. Five body styles were offered and this two-door hardtop coupe will actually seat six. It was a step up from the Dodge 330 but a step below the Dodge Polara.

The engine is a 425 horsepower, 7.0-liter Max Wedge V-8 and it’s also a factory Lightweight. It’s had unnecessary weight stripped out and lightweight panels added where appropriate. Coupled with the big engine, this was a drag strip beast. It’s one of only 10 such cars built and should bring between $200,000-$250,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $140,000.


1964 Plymouth Belvedere Max Wedge Lightweight

Photo – Mecum

The fifth generation Plymouth Belvedere was built between 1962 and 1964. For this generation the car got smaller and slotted in between the Savoy and the Fury. Offered in five body styles, this two-door hardtop could be had with a slew of engine choices.

But this example has a 7.0-liter Max Wedge V-8 making 425 horsepower. It was the final year for the Max Wedge engine before the “Hemi” made its debut. It’s a factory lightweight, so it has aluminium body panels in places. Fully restored to its correct color, this is one of just 14 Max Wedge Lightweights produced for the 1964 Belvedere. In all, 16,334 hardtop Belvederes were made in 1964. This one should bring between $125,000-$150,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum.

Update: Sold $140,000.

Falcon Competition

1963 Falcon Competition Mk III

Offered by Russo & Steele | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 18-22, 2017

Photo - Russo & Steele

Photo – Russo & Steele

Peter Pellandine’s Falcon Shells (later, Falcon Cars) built kit cars and body shells for cars in England between 1956 and 1964. The first two models they offered were called the Mark 1 and Mark 2. The third car was called the Competition and the fourth car was introduced as the Mark III but sold as the Caribbean. What we have here is a Competition model, sometimes referred to as a Mark III because it was the third model the company built.

This sports racer was originally fitted with running gear from an MG A which has since been swapped out for a Ford Cortina’s 1.3-liter straight-four. The kit cost £560 when new and both a Ford engine and a chassis were included in that price. Or you could just buy the body shell.

This particular example has been active off and on in historic racing since 1994. It’s been recently prepped and is ready to run. It is described as the “last known” Falcon Competition “known to exist.” Either that means it is the only one left or it was the last one built… I’d lean toward the last one left. Either way, you can read more about it here and see more from Russo & Steele here.

Update: Not sold.

Deep Sanderson

1963 Deep Sanderson 301 Coupe

Offered by Coys | Paris, France | October 8, 2016

Photo - Coys

Photo – Coys

The strangely-named Deep Sanderson was a car designed and built by Chris Lawrence. A former racing driver for Morgan, he began by building Formula Junior cars before turning to sports cars. The 301 was the first such car the company offered and could be had fully assembled or a kit, as they were based around BMC mechanicals, namely from the Mini.

These rear-engined cars are powered by a 1.0-liter straight-four tuned to make enough power to push this tiny thing to over 150 mph down the Mulsanne at Le Mans. And Le Mans is an important part of the history of this particular car… it actually ran there in 1963 with Chris Lawrence and Chris Spender behind the wheel. The attempt DNF’d, coming in 26th.

The current owner bought this car in 2002 and restored it – with input from the original designer himself. Only 29 of these were built in total (both kits and turn-key cars). This one, a factory Le Mans entrant, will sell for between $78,500-$90,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Coys in Paris.

Ferrari 330 America

1963 Ferrari 330 America

Offered by Bonhams | Monaco | May 13, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

The 330 America was a Ferrari produced at a transitional time in Ferrari’s history. The brand was moving from its long-lived 250 line to the 275 and 330 lines. There was also an “America” line of cars. This is considered part of the 330 series and not part of the America series, despite its name.

In fact, the car actually shares its chassis with the earlier 250 GTE. But it has a newer, bigger engine, specifically a 4.0-liter V-12 making 300 horsepower (which was based on the engine from the 400 Superamerica, hence the name). It’s a four-seater with very pretty if not aggressive body work from Pininfarina. Top speed was 150 mph.

This was a one model year-only automobile, offered in 1963 only before being supplanted by the 330 GTC. And just 50 were built, with this being car #44. It was sold new (as a white car) in the U.S. and remained in North America until being shipped back to Europe in 1995, wearing a six-year-old coat of red paint from its restoration. A more recent restoration was carried out in 2001. As an exceptionally rare Ferrari road car, it should sell for between $330,000-$440,000. This is a Ferrari that still has some pretty good room for appreciation, a rare thing these days. Click here for more info and here for more from Bonhams.

Update: Sold $489,382.

The Original Z06

1963 Chevrolet Corvette Z06

Offered by Mecum | Indianapolis, Indiana | May 20, 2016

Photo - Mecum

Photo – Mecum

This car has a lot going for it. First of all, it’s a ’63 Corvette Coupe, meaning it carries the signature “split window” rear glass –  a one-year-only feature. Then we have the fact that it is a Z06. The modern Z06 was introduced in 2001 and is the Track Attack variant of the ‘Vette. But this was the first model to carry that letter and number combo.

In 1962, Zora Arkus-Duntov wanted to build a performance Corvette for sale after the factory ban on racing went into effect. So they created “RPO Z06” – a high-performance package that could be ordered. It included beefier brakes and suspension and could only be had with the 5.4-liter V-8 making 360 horsepower. It wasn’t cheap, adding over 40% of the base price onto the cost of the car.

Only 199 of them were built in 1963. This one features a nut and bolt restoration and is an award winner. It’s about a $250,000 car. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $210,000.