Two Ford Concepts in January

Two Ford Concepts in January


2001 Ford Forty-Nine Convertible Concept

Offered by Mecum | Kissimmee, Florida | January 3-13, 2019

Photo – Mecum

The Ford Forty-Nine was a concept car introduced at the 2001 North American International Auto Show. It was a badass, black two-door that looked like a chopped ’49 Ford. The company also rolled out this, the convertible companion car. It runs and drives, but you won’t be able to register it.

Power is from a 3.9-liter V8 and it has rear-wheel drive and 20″ wheels. Imagine if Ford would’ve built something this cool. But they won’t. Ever. Because they’re Ford. Only Chrysler puts outrageous cars like this into production, or at least they used to. Maybe that’s why they’re always in financial trouble…

Anyway, this car sold at an RM auction in 2010 for $67,100. We’ll have to wait and see what Mecum can get for it 8½ years later. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum.


2001 Ford F-150 Lightning Rod Concept

Offered by Barrett-Jackson | Scottsdale, Arizona | January

Photo – Barrett-Jackson

Here’s another red Ford concept car (well, truck) from 2001. It was first shown at the 2001 Chicago Auto Show and you can tell that it had no hope for production because it lacked any sort of front bumper and the interior had a wild Maori tattoo theme going on (question for Ford: why?).

It does run and drive though, but you’ll never be able to register it for the road. It’s powered by a 5.4-liter V8, and I think the entire point of the exercise was to show that Ford could still do hot-rodding… if they wanted to.

This truck sold at an RM auction in 2012 for $46,200. Barrett-Jackson is offering it at no reserve. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

October 2018 Auction Highlights

Before we hop into October, we’ll finish off September. First, with Silverstone Auctions’ aptly-named September Sale. We featured a special edition Lambo that brought $205,616. And guess what? It was the overall top sale. We’ll give Most Interesting to this 2000 Lotus 340R that brought $88,121. Click here for full results.

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

Next, Bonhams’ Zoute Sale where this 1962 Aston Martin DB4 Series V Vantage was the top sale at $1,290,110. The Derby we featured failed to sell and the early Elva brought $165,398. Click here for complete results.

Photo – Bonhams

We didn’t get to feature anything from Mecum’s Dallas sale, but this 2017 Ford GT was the top sale at $1,320,000. This was the second time this particular GT has sold publicly in the last three months. It brought less this time than last. Four of the top 10 cars were variations of the Ford GT. Other results can be found here.

Photo – Mecum

Onward to RM in Hershey where our featured Post War convertibles both sold with the Playboy bringing $132,000 and the Monarch $60,500. The overall top sale was $495,000 for this 1930 Cadillac V-16 Roadster by Fleetwood.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Electric car sales included the Milburn for $63,250 and the Baker at $192,500, while the touring cars both sold as well: the American Eagle went for $242,000 and the Everitt $55,000. The 1905 Northern sold for $52,250, the Buick truck $30,800, and a previously-featured Packard went for $71,500. A previously-featured Delahaye failed to sell. Complete results can be found here.

And finally, we backtrack to the final sale of September, Aguttes’ sale at Montlhery. The Matra we featured didn’t sell, but the 1959 AC Aceca Wide-Track Prototype we wanted to feature (but didn’t because, well, the photo below was the only one provided). It brought $252,689. Click here for all results.

Photo – Aguttes

Ford’s Burma Jeep

1943 Ford GTB

Offered by Mecum | Chicago, Illinois | October 25-27, 2018

Photo – Mecum

Every American automobile manufacturer that survived the Great Depression produced vehicles of some kind for the war effort during WWII. Ford produced planes, jeeps, trucks, and more (yeah, okay, so one of those links is for a truck Ford built for the Nazis). This is sort of a hybrid Jeep-Truck. It is often referred to as a “Burma Jeep.”

These were heavily used by the Navy and Marines, primarily in the Pacific Theater of the war. A 90 horsepower straight-six provided power to all four wheels. Five different variants were built, and this looks like a regular base model truck for cargo or troops. They came equipped with a huge winch and dual rear wheels. They were meant to go trouncing through the jungle. And that’s just what they did.

This one shows pretty well – and the odometer has less than one mile on it. So it’s probably pretty fresh (or that gauge isn’t working). This is the first one of these I can remember seeing at auction. It’s a cool piece of American military history and you can read more here and see more from Mecum here.

Update: Sold $8,800.

August 2018 Auction Highlights, Pt. II

Picking up in Monterey with Mecum, we have three Duesenbergs, two of which sold. J-262 brought $1,155,000 and the other two were previously-featured cars. J-386 brought $3,850,000 (which turned out to be the overall top seller) and J-255 failed to sell. Excitingly, Alexander Rossi’s Indy 500-winning car sold for $1,127,500. On a related note, Most Interesting goes to this 1957 Kurtis Kraft 500G “Bardahl Special” that sold for $258,500.

Photo – Mecum

The Alpine Edition Diablo brought $253,000. Cars that failed to meet their reserve included the Lamborghini Murcielago, Ferrari F12tdf, the Sang Noir Veyron, Lamborghini Centenario, Porsche 550A, and a previously-featured Locomobile, and Porsche GT3.

We move on now to Russo & Steele in Monterey where they sold John Cena’s 2017 Ford GT for $1,540,000.

Photo – Russo & Steele

The GSM Dart that we featured from their Newport Beach sale (and failed to sell there) also failed to sell here. Click here for more results.

Finally from Monterey we have Worldwide Auctioneers. The top sale was $1,320,000 for the Duesenberg Convertible Sedan we featured. The Tourster brought $775,500. Most Interesting goes to this 1916 Locomobile Model 38 Collapsible Cabriolet that sold for $473,000. Click here for final results.

Photo – Worldwide Auctioneers

Off to the fun that is Auburn, Indiana, in the fall. RM Sotheby’s is where we’ll start and top money went to this 1957 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster for $852,500. The Duesenberg we featured wasn’t far behind, selling for $737,000.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Going through the results of this sale every year makes me sick to my stomach. This year there were at least a dozen cars that are things I would love to have (and can actually afford!) and failed to purchase because I didn’t make the trip to Auburn. Such deals would’ve included the Maxwell we featured that brought just $13,200. Similarly, the 1920 Buick went for $14,300, the Cole $28,600, and the White $29,700. A previously-featured Terraplane failed to sell and complete results can be found here.

Held the same weekend as the previous sale, Bonhams had an auction across the pond in Beaulieu. The top reported sale here (there was a pre-war Bentley that they aren’t reporting the sale price on) was $283,001 paid for this 1935 AC 2-Litre 16/80HP Competition ‘Slab-Tank’ Sports.

Photo – Bonhams

Among our feature cars, a previously-featured Marendaz led the way at $111,710. Four of the five old cars we featured sold, the exception being the Paige-Detroit. The Corre brought the biggest money at $40,215. The Phoenix blew past its estimate, selling for $32,768, the Reo sold for $23,831, and the Alldays & Onions brought $33,513. Click here for more from Bonhams.

August 2018 Auction Highlights, Pt. I

Before we get to August, we have another one from July: Silverstone Auctions’ Silverstone Classic Sale. The top sale was this 1958 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster for $1,127,595.

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

The TVR Sagaris failed to sell, but the Rinspeed R69 sold for $73,699 and a previously-featured Lola F1 street car brought $69,277. More results can be found here.

First up in August is Mecum’s Harrisburg sale and, big shocker, a 2006 Ford GT was the top sale. It went for $302,500. A previously-featured Continental Mk II failed to find a new home at this sale as well. Full results can be found here.

Photo – Mecum

And now we’re into Monterey… starting with Bonhams. The Mayfair 540K brought $3,277,500 but was eclipsed for top sale honors by this 1948 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 Competitzione that went for $3,525,000.

Photo – Bonhams

The Talbot-Lago Coupe de Ville brought $962,000 and the Delahaye failed to sell. Other no-sales included the Simplex Crane and the 1913 Mercedes Phaeton. The 1934 BMW Roadster sold for $134,400 and the wonderful Fina Sport sold for $775,000. Click here for more results.

We’ll cover Gooding & Company next. The amazing SSJ Duesenberg sold for $22,000,000 – the most expensive American car ever to trade hands at auction and easily the top seller at this sale. Other big-ticket items included the Porsche RS Spyder at $4,510,000 and the 1966 911 Spyder for $1,430,000. Most Interesting goes to this 1972 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona NART Spider by Michelotti that sold for $572,000.

Photo – Gooding & Company

A previously-featured Maserati sold again here for $797,500. The Gulf-Mirage GR8 and the Derham Duesenberg failed to sell. Click here for complete results.

And finally, for now, RM Sotheby’s in Monterey. The Le Mans podium-finishing GT40 brought an impressive $9,795,000 – but that was far, far from the biggest sale of the day. Even the $21,455,000 Aston Martin DP215 didn’t come close. No, the honor goes to the much-hyped Ferrari 250 GTO that managed $48,405,000. That cleared the last 250 GTO to change hands by a cool $10 million.

We’ll give Most Interesting to this two-tone 1939 Lagonda V-12 Drophead Coupe that brought $307,500.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Plymouth Asimmetrica sold for $335,000, but the Fiat-Patriarca, Isotta-Fraschini Boattail, Ferrari 250 MM, and Ferrari 375 America all failed to sell. Click here for the rest of the results.

Three Prototypes

Three Prototypes

Offered by Worldwide Auctioneers | Auburn, Indiana | September 1, 2018


2004 Ford GT Confirmation Prototype CP4

Photo – Worldwide Auctioneers

We’ve featured prototypes of the original Ford GT40, but here’s one of what we’ll call the “second coming” of the GT. The original concept car for this model debuted in 2002 and it’s thought that Ford built nine “confirmation prototypes” of which this is CP4, or vehicle #00007. Its purpose was to be the test bed for ride, steering, handling, and climate control systems.

All black, it was the first GT to hit 200 mph. It’s powered by a 5.4-liter supercharged V-8 making 550 horsepower. It joined the collection it is being sold from in 2012 and it is street legal. It’s the only “CP car” from the GT program that is road-registered and not governed to 15 mph. It’s thought that only four GT prototypes remain and this one is selling at no reserve. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $467,500.


1997 Ford Ghia Vivace Concept

Photo – Worldwide Auctioneers

Well here’s a weird one. It looks like the love child of a Ford Ka and a last-gen Mercury Cougar (it’s actually based on a Mondeo platform aka the Ford Contour). It’s honestly pretty crazy this car still exists at all. It’s just a rolling concept car – there’s no engine, no interior. It’s just a two-door coupe body with some wheels on a chassis.

Ford and Ghia teamed up for two concept cars in 1997 just to explore new shapes and using aluminium space-frame construction. The body is fiberglass, the wheels don’t steer, and the doors don’t even open. It’s like having a rolling brick. Not much to do with it other than look at it. But hey, at the same time, you’re going to be the only person who has one. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $1,650.


1960 Seagrave Prototype

Photo – Worldwide Auctioneers

In 1960, the Seagrave Fire Apparatus, the longest-running producer of fire apparatus in the United States dating back to 1881, decided they wanted to build passenger cars. But not just normal American passenger cars, but economy cars. This in 1960, when American automobiles were perhaps approaching their largest.

This two-door hardtop is much smaller than the photo above makes it look and it weighed in at only 1,700 pounds. Seagrave managed to build three prototypes (two in fiberglass, one in aluminium), and this fiberglass example was powered by a 2.7-liter Continental straight-four engine capable of 65 horsepower. It was pulled out of a barn in Michigan in 2013 and is restoration ready. It’s one of the most interesting cars for sale in Auburn this year. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $11,000.

July 2018 Auction Highlights

Our July auction highlights begin with Bonhams sale at the Goodwood Festival of Speed. We featured two Brough Superior road cars that both sold, with the 3½-Litre Saloon bringing $42,367 and the one-off V-12 $68,091. The overall top seller was this 1961 Aston Martin DB4GT Zagato for a whopping $13,264,951. The “regular” DB4GT we featured failed to sell.

Photo – Bonhams

The Marendaz Special also failed to meet its reserve. The other two cars we featured both turned out to be million dollar sales with the Blower Bentley bringing $2,654,569 and the Bugatti Super Sport hammering sold for slightly more at $2,691,410. Click here for complete results.

Osenat held a sale of a private collection and this 1963 Citroen ID 19 Cabriolet was the top sale at $62,172. Click here for more results.

Photo – Osenat

On to H&H Classics’ Pavilion Gardens sale where the Bond Equipe we featured was no match for the top sale, selling for $4,577. That top sale? $98,938 paid for a dusty 1962 Jaguar E-Type Series I 3.8 Coupe.

Photo – H&H Classics

The Beauford and McLaughlin both failed to sell. You can find more results here.

Now it’s time for Silverstone Auctions’ Silverstone Classic Race Car Sale. The top sale, which was one of just a handful of cars to find new owners, was this 1964 Ford Lotus Cortina Mk I for $73,884. Click here for complete results.

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

And finally, into August, Worldwide Auctioneers liquidated Hostetler’s Hudson Auto Museum in Shipshewana, Indiana. The top sale was the 1952 “Fabulous Hudson Hornet” NASCAR race car that sold for $1,265,000. The next big-dollar feature car was the Hudson Town Car. It brought $313,500. We’ll award Most Interesting to this 1936 Terraplane Series 61 Panel Delivery that sold for $115,500.

Photo – Worldwide Auctioneers

The Dover Mail Truck achieved $55,000 and the Essex Touring Car brought $26,400. More results can be found here.

GT40 Mk II

1966 Ford GT40 Mk II

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monterey, California | August 24-25, 2018

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

We all know the story of the GT40 by this point: Ford wanted Ferrari. Ferrari said no. Ford decided to whip Ferrari at Le Mans. And then did just that. The first GT40s hit the track in May 1964. Later that year, after disappointing results, the racing program was given to Carroll Shelby and he turned it around.

Using 1964 and 1965 as “work-out-the-bugs” seasons, Ford applied an upgrade to the GT40 for 1966. Dubbed “Mk II,” the cars now carried monstrous 7.0-liter V-8 engines. These 427s were built by Holman-Moody of NASCAR fame and boasted 450 horsepower. To handle the extra weight of the stock car engine, Kar Kraft upgraded the Mk II’s chassis, suspension, and engine mounts. And oh boy, what a package it was.

Ford dominated the 1966 24 Hours of Le Mans, finishing 1-2-3 in a clean sweep and embarrassing Ferrari – which was sort of the point of the entire program. This car was part of that sweep, coming home third. The race history for this chassis includes:

  • 1966 24 Hours of Daytona – DNF (with Ronnie Bucknum and Richie Ginther)
  • 1966 12 Hours of Sebring – 12th (with Bucknum and A.J. Foyt)
  • 1966 24 Hours of Le Mans – 3rd (with Bucknum and Dick Hutcherson)
  • 1967 24 Hours of Daytona – DNF (with Mark Donohue and Peter Revson)

In 1970, Ford donated this car to the Harrah Collection. A few other private owners followed, with a restoration coming in the 1990s. One of only eight examples of the Mk II produced, this car is well acquainted with the historic show and race circuit, accumulating refurbishment as-needed along the way.

Coming out of nearly a decade and a half of continuous ownership, this GT40 will be overshadowed (in price and in conversation) by RM’s consignment of a 250 GTO. But this is a far more historically important – and interesting – car. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

 

Side note: Dick Hutcherson is, statistically, one of the greatest NASCAR drivers of all time – despite only three seasons in the sport. He is never brought up in conversations about NASCAR greats. But he should be. Plus, how many other NASCAR drivers have finished on the podium at Le Mans? Just wanted to put that out there…

Update: Sold $9,795,000.

June 2018 Auction Highlights, Pt. III

The third sale Bonhams held in June was the liquidation of the Den Hartogh Ford museum in the Netherlands. Kind of a weird spot for one of the largest collections of Ford vehicles anywhere in the world, but everyone’s got their thing. In chronological order, the early Fords we featured sold for:

There were a bunch of interesting cars here, especially commercial vehicles. We’ll give Most Interesting to 1931 Ford Model AA Camper that brought $26,790.

Photo – Bonhams

Speaking of commercial vehicles, here are the results for the five we featured:

The rest of the results can be found here.

RM Sotheby’s liquidated the rest of the Dingman Collection and another Ford was the top seller. It’s an awesome Roush Racing 1995 Ford Mustang Cobra SCCA Trans Am that sold for $720,000.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Lincoln Continental was featured sold for $60,480. Final results can be found here.

On to July where Historics at Brooklands held a sale at the Brooklands Motor Museum. We featured a Renault Alpine and it sold for $44,738. The top sale was this 2012 Ferrari 458 Italia for $168,515. Click here for more results.

Photo – Historics at Brooklands

Next up, Artcurial’s Le Mans Classic sale. While the Venturi we featured failed to sell, the biggest sale of the day was $3,669,607 for this 1963 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Roadster.

Photo – Artcurial

The strange Sovam 1100 sold for $13,915. And the two Lambos both sold as well, with the Countach bringing $1,141,049 and the 400 GT $500,948. Click here for more results.

And finally, Brightwells Classic & Vintage sale. The Mini Marcos failed to sell but the Mini-Comtesse did, bringing $1,089. The top sale was this 1961 Jaguar E-Type Series I 3.8 Roadster for $178,661. The Bristol 400 brought $75,385 Click here for all results.

Photo – Brightwells

June 2018 Auction Highlights, Pt. II

Bonhams held back to back sales the first weekend of June. In addition to their Aston Martin sale, they also had their sale at the Greenwich Concours. While the 1907 Thomas-Detroit we featured was an incredible bargain at $61,600, the top seller was this slightly more expensive 1965 Aston Martin DB5 Convertible for $1,450,000.

Photo – Bonhams

The National Model 50 we featured brought $147,840. Both cars from Carroll Shelby’s personal collection that we featured sold, with the Ram Prototype bringing $33,040 and the V-8 Can-Am $100,800. The Panhard and Lozier both failed to sell. Click here for complete results.

Next up, we have the second of Osenat’s June sales. This was a more traditional sale. The Matra we featured sold for $24,462 and the top sale was $322,023 for this 1930 Bugatti Type 49 Roadster (it’s kind of an assembled car so the year is sort of a guess). More results can be found here.

Photo – Osenat

Onward to Barrett-Jackson’s Northeast sale. The top sale here was a charity combo lot: $1,000,000 for the last production Viper and Challenger Demon.

Photo – Barrett-Jackson

Meanwhile, back in Reality Land, the Whippet we featured sold for $13,970 and the Model T-based Mercury Speedster $24,200. Click here for complete results.

On the complete other side of the country we’ve got Mecum in Portland, Oregon. Shockingly, this Mecum sale saw a 2005 Ford GT take top sale honors, this one bringing $214,500.

Photo – Mecum

The Gardner Radio Special we featured failed to sell. Click here for more results from Portland.

And now Brightwells’ Bicester Classic & Vintage sale. The Bitter SC we featured failed to meet its reserve and the Buckler was withdrawn. The top sale was this 1935 Riley Amilcar Special that brought $175,581. Click here for complete results.

Photo – Brightwells