Jordan 196

1996 Jordan-Peugeot 196

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Paris, France | February 6, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Last May, RM Sotheby’s sold a copy of Jordan’s 199 F1 car that was photographed in a very similar position to this car. I’m not sure whose collection these are coming out of (and frankly I really don’t feel like trying to figure it out), but one wonders if there will be more to come.

Jordan’s first year in F1 was 1991, and this was their 1996 car. Power is from a 3.0-liter Peugeot V10, an example of which this care retains. The team’s 1996 drivers were Rubens Barrichello and Martin Brundle, and the race history for this chassis includes:

  • 1996 European Grand Prix – 6th (with Brundle)
  • 1996 Canadian Grand Prix – 6th (with Brundle)
  • 1996 British Grand Prix – 6th (with Brundle)

It was raced in a few other races as well, but those were the highlights. Trackable cars from F1’s V10 era are hard to come by, and you can read more about this one here and see more from RM Sotheby’s in Paris here.

Ferrari F1/87

1987 Ferrari F1/87

Offered by Bonhams | Monaco | May 11, 2018

Photo – Bonhams

This is a pure 1980s Formula One car. The F1/87 was Ferrari’s entrant for the 1987 F1 season. Their drivers were Gerhard Berger (who won the last two races of the year in a similar car) and Michele Alboreto, who drove this one. This car, interestingly, is chassis #100 – which it means that it was Ferrari’s 100th Grand Prix car built since they started that numbering sequence in 1961.

This car is powered by a 1.5-liter turbocharged V-6 that was capable of 950 horsepower in qualifying trim. That’s a lot of power from such a tiny engine. The car improved as the year went on (hence Berger’s two wins) and this was a mid-season car, used by Alboreto in the following races:

  • 1987 Hungarian Grand Prix – 19th, DNF
  • 1987 Austrian Grand Prix – 18th, DNF
  • 1987 Italian Grand Prix – 23rd, DNF
  • 1987 Portuguese Grand Prix – 16th, DNF

Okay, so maybe not Ferrari’s most successful chassis. And definitely not Alboreto’s most successful F1 season. This car has been on long-term static display and appears to be entirely original (because it looks like it’s been used). It is noted that a complete mechanical recommissioning will be necessary before any future use. Still though, it’s a Ferrari F1 car. In this condition, it’s expected to bring between $790,000-$1,000,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Bonhams.

Update: Not sold.

Two Single-Seaters at Rétromobile

Two Single-Seaters at Rétromobile


1952 Gordini Type 16

Offered by Artcurial | Paris, France | February 9, 2018

Photo – Artcurial

Amédée Gordini started working on cars in the 1930s. He built his first single-seaters right after WWII and now the Gordini brand is owned by Renault. As a team, Gordini competed in Formula One between 1950 and 1956. This is their 1952 racer… or at least that’s when it debuted.

The Type 16 was developed as a Formula 2 car for the 1952 season, which was what the regulations were for the World Driver’s Championship that year. It’s powered by a 2.0-liter straight-six and it was the third example built, debuting at the 1952 French Grand Prix. This car’s lengthy race history includes:

  • 1952 French Grand Prix (Reims, F2) – 1st (with Jean Behra)
  • 1952 French Grand Prix (Rouen, F1) – 7th (with Behra)
  • 1952 Italian Grand Prix – DNF (with Maurice Trintignant)
  • 1953 Argentinian Grand Prix – DNF (with Carlos Menditeguy)
  • 1953 Dutch Grand Prix – DNF (with Harry Schell)
  • 1953 Belgian Grand Prix – DNF (with Behra)
  • 1953 French Grand Prix – DNF (with Trintignant)
  • 1953 British Grand Prix – DNF (with Trintignant)
  • 1953 German Grand Prix – DNF (with Trintignant)
  • 1953 Swiss Grand Prix – DNF (with Trintignant)
  • 1953 Italian Grand Prix – 5th (with Trintignant)
  • 1954 Argentinian Grand Prix – DQ (with Behra)
  • 1954 Belgian Grand Prix – DNF (with Behra)
  • 1954 French Grand Prix – 6th (with Behra)
  • 1954 British Grand Prix – DNF (with Clemar Bucci)
  • 1954 German Grand Prix – DNF (with Paul Frère)
  • 1954 Swiss Grand Prix – DNF (with Bucci)
  • 1954 Italian Grand Prix – DNF (with Bucci)
  • 1954 Spanish Grand Prix – DNF (with Jacques Pollet)
  • 1955 Argentinian Grand Prix – DNF (with Pablo Birger)

Wow. That’s a lot of F1 races for one chassis over four different seasons (with some pretty big names from the era as well). The car was not necessarily competitive at the end of its career as F1 advances at a pretty breakneck pace, but it was still out there, grinding laps. The car was acquired in the 1970s by Christian Huet, who wrote the book on Gordini. The car was offered to him by Gordini himself before passing away.

It’s well-documented and currently has a different engine installed, although a 2.0-liter F2 engine does come with it. Apparently, Gordini only built 33 single-seater cars and 14 of those are in the Schlumpf hoard. This one should bring between $1,100,000-$1,700,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.


1950 AGS Panhard Monomill

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Paris, France | February 7, 2018

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Here’s a strange, one-off single-seater. Called the Atelier Guérin Special, or AGS, this car was built by Pierre Guérin in Grenoble, France. It’s based around a Panhard car of the era and, quite unusually for an open-wheel race car, features front-wheel drive.

It’s powered by an 850cc Panhard twin. Apparently it was raced in period, but it isn’t really known where, though it did compete in some hillclimb events in Italy more recently and that’s probably where its specialty lies.

It finally left its hometown in 1990 and its then-new owner kept the car for 20 years. A few others have enjoyed it since then and now it’s on the open market. It’s a unique, period-correct time attack car waiting for a new owner to take it to the track. It should bring between $30,000-$40,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $39,452.

Ferrari F1-91

1991 Ferrari F1-91

Offered by Bonhams | Stuttgart, Germany | August 12-September 27, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Bonhams is offering cars from the Willi Balz collection at a public tender sale – meaning it isn’t a live auction, but instead you can offer a price via a sealed bid. There are a number of classic F1 cars on offer here, including this: Ferrari’s 1991 F1 machine.

The F1-91 was also known as the Ferrari 642, following the 1990 641/2 and the 1989 F1-89. For 1991, the Scuderia powered their cars with a 3.5-liter V-12. Horsepower should be about 740, as the 1990 car put out 685 from the same engine (up 85 from 1989). This car has race history including:

  • 1991 San Marino Grand Prix – DNS (with Alain Prost)
  • 1991 Monaco Grand Prix – 3rd (with Jean Alesi)

Since its retirement from Ferrari, it has been used at historic events including Goodwood and the Nurburgring. The 642 had a short shelf-life as it was only used in the first five races of 1991 before being replaced by the 643. This, chassis 124, is the third of five built and it should bring between $340,000-$680,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

BRM P133

1968 BRM P133

Offered by Bonhams | Stuttgart, Germany | August 12, 2016-September 27, 2016

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

In modern Formula 1 it’s kind of rare for a chassis manufacturer to build its own engines. Only actual road car manufacturers that compete do it (Mercedes, Ferrari, Renault). Those teams that exist solely to compete in motorsport usually outsource their engines… but when your team name is British Racing Motors, I guess building engines is sort of your wheelhouse.

BRM was founded in 1945 by Raymond Mays and competed in F1 between 1950 and 1977. It won the constructors’ title in 1962 (this was the year that Graham Hill won the drivers’ championship).

This, the first P133 built, is powered by a 3.0-liter V-12 and has race history including:

  • 1968 South African Grand Prix – 7th (with Jackie Oliver)
  • 1968 Belgian Grand Prix – 2nd (with Pedro Rodriguez)
  • 1968 Dutch Grand Prix – 3rd (with Rodriguez)
  • 1968 German Grand Prix –  6th (with Rodriguez)
  • 1968 Canadian Grand Prix – 3rd (with Rodriguez)
  • 1968 Mexican Grand Prix – 4th (with Rodriguez)

The car is listed as being in original condition, even though it has been used in historic racing. It’s an awesome example of late-1960s F1 technology and has great looks to match. It should bring between $340,000-$450,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Scarab F1

1960 Scarab-Offenhauser Formula One

Offered by Bonhams | Goodwood, U.K. | September 12, 2015

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Lance Reventlow. He was an American born in London. He was also an heir to the Woolworth fortune. His step dad won the Targa Florio. These things were the perfect storm for an American forming his own Formula One team.

Scarab was the name of the cars that were built between the late 1950s and early 1960s. They were designed by Tom Barnes and Dick Troutman and financed and raced by Reventlow (other guys raced the cars, too). The front-engined open-wheel cars were built for the 1960 Formula One season and it didn’t go well because the rear-engined revolution was already under way. Scarab only had one start in Formula One: 10th place at the 1960 U.S. Grand Prix with driver Chuck Daigh (although the tried to compete in two other races, one a twin DNQ and one a twin DNS).

After that, they campaigned the car in International Formula racing at races at places like Goodwood. But sports cars were their mainstay. Originally, this car was powered by a Scarab-designed, Offenhauser-style straight-four but it now has a 3.6-liter Offenhauser straight-four – one of only 55 such engines built.

This car is historic event eligible and has definitely been used, even though the restoration is great. The car is coming from a collection of Scarab cars, with one more assembled F1 car among them (of three built). American-built F1 cars are very rare and while this car wasn’t dominant, it is a piece if history. It should bring between $1,100,000-$1,500,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $1,053,808.

1990 Williams F1 Car

1990 Williams-Renault FW13B

Offered by Bonhams | Goodwood, England | June 26, 2015

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Can you believe the Williams F1 team has been around since 1978? Considering they do not have huge funding dollars from a road-car division and were founded by a travelling grocery salesman and an engineer, they’ve done pretty well.

The FW13 was used in the final four races of the 1989 season and for 1990 it was updated to the spec you see here, and dubbed FW13B. It is powered by a naturally-aspirated Renault 3.5-liter RS2 V-10 and the car was used for the entire 1990 season.

The racing resume for this car includes:

  • 1990 United States Grand Prix – 3rd (with Thierry Boutsen)
  • 1990 Brazilian Grand Prix – 5th (with Boutsen)
  • 1990 Japanese Grand Prix – 4th (with Boutsen)
  • 1990 Australian Grand Prix – 6th (with Boutsen)

This car may never have won a race, but its sister cars did in the hands of both Boutsen and teammate Riccardo Patrese. The Canon Williams livery is a great 1990s F1 paint scheme. If you want to take this to track days, you’ll need to put in a little work as the Renault V-10 is currently inoperable (although it is correct). It should sell for between $140,000-$180,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $160,748.

Lotus 59

1970 Lotus 59

Offered by Coys | London, U.K. | March 10, 2015

Photo - Coys

Photo – Coys

The Lotus 59 was a successful Formula 2 racing car built by Lotus for the 1969 and 1970 seasons (although it was replaced mid-1970). The 59 chassis was actually used in Formula 3 as well as Formula B and Formula Ford in addition to F2. The only thing that changed on the car between the series was the engine.

This is an ex-Team Lotus car that competed in the European Formula 3 championship. It was a pay-to-drive ride for up-and-coming drivers looking to make an impression and attract a chance in a Formula One car. This car was raced by Bev Bond and was the winning car at the 1970 Oulton Park British Empire Trophy race.

Later, this car would be used in the Ron Howard movie Rush, where it stared as James Hunt’s F3 car. As an F3 car, this car would be powered by a 1.0-liter Cosworth straight-four making about 100-110 horsepower. You can read more here and see more from Coys here.

Update: Not sold.

Footwork FA15

1994 Footwork-Ford FA15

Offered by Artcurial | Paris, France | February 6, 2014

Photo - Artcurial

Photo – Artcurial

Arrows Grand Prix International was formed in 1977 by Franco Ambrosio, Alan Rees, Jackie Oliver, Dave Wass, and Tony Southgate. “Arrows” was a play on the first letters of their last names. The made their race debut in 1978. In 1990, the team received a large investment from Japanese businessman Wataru Ohashi and his logistics company, Footwork Express.

For 1991, the team was actually renamed from Arrows to Footwork Arrows. They competed under the “Footwork” name from 1991 through mid-1996, so technically, even though the catalog description here lists this as an Arrows, it’s actually a Footwork car. The engine is a Ford-Cosworth 3.5-liter V8. The car was a relative backmarker and this example (of the two built) was campaigned by Gianni Morbidelli. The only finishes of this car are:

  • 1994 German Grand Prix – 5th
  • 1994 Belgian Grand Prix – 6th
  • 1994 Portuguese Grand Prix – 9th
  • 1994 European Grand Prix – 11th

The other 12 races were DNFs, although Christian Fittipaldi fared better in the sister car, enough to take Arrows to 9th in the constructor standings at the end of the year. At any rate, if you want an easy-to-use late-model F1 car for fun, this one will run you between $80,000-$150,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $209,119.

Ferrari 641/2

1990 Ferrari 641/2

Offered by Gooding & Company | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 16, 2015

Photo - Gooding & Company

Photo – Gooding & Company

The 1990 Formula One season was packed with legendary drivers: Senna, Prost, Piquet, and Nigel Mansell, who drove this very Ferrari. The 641 was a development of the 640, which was used the season prior.

It’s  powered by a 3.5-liter V-12 making an estimated 685 horsepower at an ear-splitting 13,000 RPM. The racing history for this chassis includes:

  • 1990 German Grand Prix – 19th, DNF (all races with Mansell)
  • 1990 Portuguese Grand Prix – 1st
  • 1990 Spanish Grand Prix – 2nd
  • 1990 Japanese Grand Prix (site of the infamous Senna/Prost debacle) – 14th, DNF
  • 1990 Australian Grand Prix – 2nd

So this is a race winning Formula One car that had three podiums in five races and was raced by one of the sports legendary champions. It was used in the second-half of the season, presumably hence the “/2” (indicating updates on the car). This is one of seven or eight 641 chassis built and a handful are in private hands. It would be a most fun track day car, if you have the means. It should sell for between $800,000-$1,100,000. Click here for more info and here for the rest of Gooding’s lineup.

Update: Sold $990,000.