Countach Periscopio

1975 Lamborghini Countach LP400

Offered by Artcurial | Le Mans, France | July 7, 2018

Photo – Artcurial

The Countach was the second, what we’ll call, “Mega-Lamborghini.” Originally there was the Miura, the first mid-engined supercar. There were other V-8 and V-12-powered cars in between but they weren’t outrageous. And if there’s one thing that Lamborghini does well, it’s being outrageous.

Originally penned by Marcello Gandini at Bertone, the Countach went on sale in 1974. The LP400 (LP, for the longitudinal mounting of the engine) was powered by a 375 horsepower, 3.9-liter V-12. Top speed was 167 mph. The LP400 was the first model and there would be a few others, as production rambled on through 1990. Lamborghini as a corporate entity changed hands a few times during the Countach’s production run so it was a car made with many “cooks in the kitchen,” if you will.

The other thing that changed between 1974 and 1990 was the preferred styling by customers. The Countach was sort of the torch-bearer for this as they got boxier and boxier with time. But this cool, sleek, original design is really the best-looking of the bunch.

This example was purchased new by a Saudi Prince and by the 1990s it made its way to Italy. An extensive restoration by the third owner followed, with a repaint in the original Giallo Fly. It’s traveled less than 6,000 km since the end of the restoration. Lambo only built 158 examples of the LP400, making it the second rarest variant of the Countach (after the LP400 S). It should sell for between $1,050,000-$1,160,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Artucurial.

Update: Sold $1,141,049.

Monica Sedan

1975 Monica 560

Offered by Artcurial | Paris, France | February 9, 2018

Photo – Artcurial

No this is not a stretched Lamborghini Islero. Nor is it an Iso Fidia or Monteverdi. It is a Monica, which was a car built by CFMF, a company that specialized in building rail cars. The owner of the company, Jean Tastevin, was a car guy who lamented the fact that he didn’t buy a Facel Vega while they were still on sale. So he set out in the 1970s to build a high-quality French luxury car.

Introduced in 1974, the Moncia – whose sole model was the 560 sedan – is powered by a 5.6-liter Chrysler V-8 that makes 285 horsepower. A big American V-8 and French style made for what should have been a winning combination, but the oil crisis happened to hit around this time and that American V-8 was thirsty. Tastevin decided to shut the company down in 1975.

Only 22 of these were built and very few still exist. This one was sold new in Spain and it remained there until 1990 when it returned to France. It has been restored (in 2015) and would be a rare sight anywhere it’s shown. It should bring between $120,000-$155,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $131,418.

Jensen GT

1975 Jensen GT

Offered by Historics at Brooklands | July 8, 2017

Photo – Historics at Brooklands

Brothers Richard and Alan Jensen built their first Austin Seven-based cars in the mid-1920s. In the 1930s they began modifying Fords before turning to full scale production of their own designs in 1935.

In 1972 the company introduced the Jensen-Healey, the best-selling car in company history. It was a two-door convertible that lasted through 1976, when the company folded. A year prior to that, they presented this “shooting brake” version of the Jensen-Healey, and called it the GT. This wagon-esque car featured a tiny rear seat and shared the Healey’s 2.0-liter straight-four (which was a Lotus-designed engine) that makes 144 horsepower.

This is, perhaps, the best-looking Jensen GT I’ve ever seen. Well-restored, it’s a 61,000 mile car in bright Atlantic Blue with a large cloth sunroof, chin spoiler and wire wheels. The GT was only produced for a span of eight months, with just 511 cars constructed before Jensen closed up shop. This one should bring between $17,900-$23,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $20,194.

Three Italian Microcars

1975 Casalini Sulky

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | March 8, 2017

Photo – Brightwells

Casalini bills itself as the oldest microcar company in the world. Not the first, the oldest. They sold their first microcar in 1969 and are still selling tiny vehicles in Europe today. They built this thing – with slight modifications over time – from 1971 through 2000.

Let’s talk about that name, “Sulky.” It seems like it would only by driven by depressed divorcees and people who just failed out of graduate school. Just imagine passing a parade of these things on the highway, all of the drivers sobbing and listening to Adele (okay, so a sulky is technically a type of one-seat horse-drawn carriage).

This car is powered by a 50cc single-cylinder (later cars had 60cc singles then 250cc twins) situated above the rear wheels (which are driven). While the outside of this car looks a little rough, the photos of the engine compartment make it seem very clean, so it might actually be a runner. It will sell at no reserve and you can see more photos here.

Update: Sold $1,701.


1960 Lambretta Li 175

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | March 8, 2017

Photo – Brightwells

Innocenti’s fame stems mostly from their line of Lambretta scooters that sold like crazy in Italy after WWII. They built a lot of cars too, but the Lambretta name is more well known than Innocenti’s. The first three-wheelers were badged as Lambrettas but later trucklets (there were vans too) were called the Innocenti Lambro.

This pickup model has a 175cc single-cylinder engine making 7 horsepower. This vehicle is listed in the auction catalog as a “circa 1960 Innocenti Lambro”, which, when coupled with the engine size, raises some questions. If it’s truly an Innocenti Lambro, it would be a Lambro 175 model, which was built from 1963 through 1965. There were also Lambretta-badged pickups with a 175cc engine built from 1959 through 1963. The real giveaway is the badging on it which clearly makes it a Lambretta Li 175, likely a Series 2 model at that. Top speed is 38 mph in case you’re hellbent on setting land speed records.

These aren’t seen too often today (especially outside of Italy) and this one, which is kind of rough, should sell for between $1,875-$2,500. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $3,403.


1962 Moto Guzzi Ercole

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | March 8, 2017

Photo – Brightwells

This is (at least) the third commercial vehicle produced by a motorcycle manufacturer that we’ve featured. In the vein of the famous Vespa Ape and Lambretti Lambro, the Moto Guzzi Ercole is a scooter-based pickup truck (though this one seems larger). The Ercole was first introduced in 1946 by Moto Guzzi, Europe’s oldest continuously operating motorcycle manufacturer.

The Ercole would be made through 1980 and this one is powered by a hefty 500cc single-cylinder engine. This three-wheeler is really just a motorcycle up front (the inside of the “passenger compartment” is literally just a motorcycle) with a steel cage wrapped around it. The rear pickup bed is a dumper, which is nice. It will sell at no reserve. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $3,403.

Casalini Sulky

1975 Casalini Sulky

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | March 8, 2017

Photo – Brightwells

Casalini bills itself as the oldest microcar company in the world. Not the first, the oldest. They sold their first microcar in 1969 and are still selling tiny vehicles in Europe today. They built this thing – with slight modifications over time – from 1971 through 2000.

Let’s talk about that name, “Sulky.” It seems like it would only by driven by depressed divorcees and people who just failed out of graduate school. Just imagine passing a parade of these things on the highway, all of the drivers sobbing and listening to Adele (okay, so a sulky is technically a type of one-seat horse-drawn carriage).

This car is powered by a 50cc single-cylinder (later cars had 60cc singles then 250cc twins) situated above the rear wheels (which are driven). While the outside of this car looks a little rough, the photos of the engine compartment make it seem very clean, so it might actually be a runner. It will sell at no reserve and you can see more photos here.

Update: Sold $1,701.

Another Batch of Military Vehicles

The Littlefield Collection

Offered by Auctions America | Portola Valley, California | July 11-12, 2014


 1942 Cadillac M5 Stuart

Photo - Auctions America

Photo – Auctions America

Labeling this as a Cadillac might be a little misleading, but Cadillac did build it – so why shouldn’t they get the credit? The M5 was a version of the M3 Stuart – one of the most popular light tanks of the Second World War. General Motors was behind it and the M5 was basically an M3 with upgraded armor.

In all, 2,074 M5s were built – only 1,470 were built by Cadillac in Michigan. This tank has been given a new engine and fresh restoration. It runs and drives wonderfully and is usable. The engines are twin 8-cylinders from Cadillac making a combined output of 220 horsepower. It can do 36 mph and be yours for $100,00-$150,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $310,500.


ca.1975 Panhard M3

Photo - Auctions America

Photo – Auctions America

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Panhard M3

ca.1975 Panhard M3

Offered by Auctions America | Portola Valley, California | July 11-12, 2014

Photo - Auctions America

Photo – Auctions America

Panhard is one of the oldest automobile companies in the world. While they stopped building road cars long ago, military vehicle manufacture has continued to this today. The M3 is an armored personnel carrier that went into production for the French military in 1971. Only 1,200 were built by the end of production in 1986.

This one is in good condition and runs and drives. The engine is a 90 horsepower Panhard four. It’s pretty incredible that this 6-ton vehicle can do 56 mph. You can buy it for between $50,000-$75,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $39,100.

Moynet LM75

1975 Moynet LM75

For Sale by Atelier 46 | Courbevoie, Paris, France

Photo - Atelier 46

Photo – Atelier 46

Andre Moynet was a French war hero. He flew 115 wartime missions during World War II and dabbled in politics and sport after it was over. He was later a test pilot and worked for Matra. When he found some spare time, he built this sports prototype for the 24 Hours Le Mans (after he took Matra there in 1968).

This sleek prototype is powered by a Chrysler/Simca 2.0-liter straight-four making 190 horsepower. The Esso colors are what it wore in the 1975 24 Hours of Le Mans – the only race in which this car competed. It was driven by three women: Christine Dacremont, Michele Mouton, and Marianne Hoepfner. They finished 21st and won their class.

The car sat for three decades before being completely restored and competing in the Le Mans Classic in 2010. Price is not available but it is the only Moynet automobile ever built (under his own name – he designed Matra’s Le Mans car too). Click here for more info or to purchase this piece of history.

Saurer Merak

1975 Maserati Merak by Saurer

Offered by Silverstone Auctions | Silverstone, England | May 17, 2013

1975 Maserati Merak by Saurer

The Maserati Merak was one of the “Citroen Maseratis” – one of five models introduced by Maserati while under the control of their French overlords. Strangely, these cars weren’t as strange as most Citroens (thankfully). But they did have their quirks.

The Merak was essentially a V-6 version of the V-8 Bora. The first cars (built under Citroen’s ownership) used a 3.0-liter V-6 making 187 horsepower. Other engine options would come later, but this car has the 187 horse V-6. That was enough power to propel the car to 150 mph. Not bad.

This left-hand drive Merak was sent, from new, to Saurer – a Swiss coachbuilder (not the same company that built Saurer trucks from the turn of the century and into the 1980s – or at least so far as I can tell). The body was re-designed – or, at least tweaked – to the point where you see it now. I’d almost say they “Ferrari’d it” a little bit. It definitely looks sporty with a more prominent grille. It also has a bit of “wide-body race car” look to it. I like it. The interior is red.

This is the only such Merak re-bodied by Saurer. It is expected to sell for between $53,000-$60,000. Click here for more info and here for the rest of the lineup from Silverstone’s sale.

Update: Sold $69,000.

Panther J72

1975 Panther J72 Roadster

Offered by Bonhams | Harrogate, U.K. | November 14, 2012

Panther Westwinds was founded in 1972 by Robert Jankel to build low-volume sports and luxury cars in Surrey. The J72 was the first car from the company and it combined a little of both luxury and sports car. It was not a kit car, but rather a full production car with styling reminiscent of the Jaguar SS100. It was not a replica either and it preceded the wave of “nostalgia cars” (aka neo-classics) by a solid five years.

It did, however, use Jaguar engines. You could get a 5.3-liter V12 or your choice of two Jaguar straight-sixes. This one has the 4.2-liter I6 (a 3.8 was also available) that makes somewhere around 240 horsepower.

The J72 was produced from 1972 until 1981. In total, 368 were built and this one has been owned by its current owner since new. It’s a 7,000 mile car that has seen extremely light use in the past 10 years. This is a rare, unusual and cool car for only $29,000-$35,000. For more information, click here. For more from Bonhams at the Great Yorkshire Showground, click here.

Update: Sold $35,500.