Saleen S7 LM

2007 Saleen S7 LM

Offered by Bring a Trailer Auctions | Online

Photo – Bring a Trailer

The S7 was introduced by Saleen in 2000, and production officially trickled on through 2009. Road cars were offered in base and Twin Turbo versions. The S7R (the racing variant) competed in different sports car series all over the world, including running at Le Mans, where it landed on the class podium in 2001.

Saleen has a complicated corporate history, and the short version is that in 2017 they formed a joint venture with a Chinese city to build cars for China. Part of that grand launch was an updated version of the S7 dubbed “LM” to trumpet their brief motorsport success.

Instead of building new cars, they sort of just dressed up existing S7s, including this 2007 model that was recommissioned as an LM in 2018. It retains the S7’s natural good looks but somehow makes it look even better with a two-tone finish and a big rear wing. The five-spoke wheels also help. A lot. I was never a fan of the stock chrome wheels these came with originally.

Power is from a twin-turbocharged 7.0-liter V8 rated at 1,000 horsepower. The top speed is supposed to be in excess of 240 mph. This car carries a plaque identifying it as LM #007, which I guess means there are at least six more out there. No word on how many have been built, or even if they are done building/converting cars. My guess: if you show up at Saleen HQ with an S7 and a bag of cash, they’d convert your car too. The bidding on this example is already going strong; click here for more info.

Update: Sold $1,200,000.

1922 Lexington Sedan

1922 Lexington Series S 7-Passenger Sedan

Offered by Bring a Trailer Auctions | Online

Photo – Bring a Trailer

The Lexington Motor Company was founded in its namesake Kentucky city in 1909 by a man named Kinzea Stone, who relocated the company to Connersville, Indiana, in 1910. E.W. Ansted bought the company in 1913, which by this time had already competed in the Indianapolis 500. The company won the Pikes Peak hill climb in 1920 before succumbing to the financial realities of the early 1920s. In 1927, the marque was purchased by E.L. Cord, who merged it into Auburn.

The Series S was produced alongside the more powerful Series T in 1921 and 1922. Power is from a 47-horsepower Ansted inline-six. This car was actually owned by William Ansted, a descendant of Lexington’s 1920’s president, Frank B. Ansted (who I assume was related to E.W.). William, who owned A.J. Foyt’s 1964 Indy 500-winning car, donated this very car to the IMS Museum in the 1960s.

And that’s where it has remained since. It has apparently been sitting stagnant for at least the last 15 years and requires a tad bit of work to become roadworthy again. Lexington is one of those interesting early Indiana-based motor companies that attempted to make a name for themselves at the Speedway. And this car’s Speedway connection makes it even more interesting. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $15,500.