Shelby Series I Prototype

1999 Shelby Series I Prototype

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Phoenix, Arizona | January 17, 2020

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Shelby Series 1 was a legitimate, home-grown American sports car. It was the first Shelby-branded car to start from a clean-sheet design. They managed to produce just 249 examples – all in 1999.

Power is from a 4.0-liter Oldsmobile Aurora V8. That may sound lame, but remember that engine was also the basis for Olds’ Indy car engine around this time. Power in the Series 1 production cars was rated at 320 horsepower, and a top speed of 170 mph was reported.

This is actually a pre-production prototype and demonstration car. A couple of these prototypes were built. Later on, after the Series 1 program went bust, a Series II was introduced, but never advanced beyond the prototype stage. At no reserve, this car is expected to fetch $120,000-$150,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

C8 Double 12

2002 Spyker C8 Double 12S

For Sale at Classic Youngtimers Consultancy | Uden, Netherlands

Photo – Classic Youngtimers Consultancy

Modern Spykers are pretty surreal cars. They have some of the best interiors of any car you’ll find, and their overall aero-inspired look is quite unlike anything else. The Spyker C8, in some form, has been on sale since 2000. We’ve featured one of their base C8 Spyder models, but this is a much rarer beast.

The Double 12 is, I think, the ultimate version of the first generation of the C8. Produced between 2002 and 2003-ish, the car was the road-going version of the Double 12R race car. The 12R was supposed to be homologated to race at Le Mans, but Spyker didn’t have the capacity to do so. There ended up being just 15 built, and only one was powered by a 4.0-liter BMW Motorsport V8 good for 450 horsepower (the other cars had lower-tune Audi powerplants).

That technically makes this a factory one-off. It was kept by Spyker founder Victor Muller in his office for years and now shows just over 500 miles. It’s for sale in the Netherlands with a list price of $613,415. Click here for more info.

Bremen Sebring

1985 Bremen Sebring

Offered by Barrett-Jackson | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 14, 2020

Photo – Barrett-Jackson

Kit cars get a bad rap, and while it is sometimes deserved, I always remember that “hey, someone thought this was a good idea.” In this case, that someone was Al Hildebrand, the importer of the Sterling (aka the Nova) kit car who decided he could improve upon that already-popular idea.

The Sebring is Volkswagen-based, and this car is powered by a flat-four from a Porsche 914 (displacement unknown!). It’s actually in really good shape, as many of these were not cared for as this one has been. The dashboard even has a TV monitor in it.

The coolest part of this car is that it doesn’t have doors. Instead, the entire canopy flips forward to allow access to the cabin. Founded around 1970, Hildebrand’s Bremen, Indiana-based company lasted until 1988. They offered other kits as well, along with V6 and turbo V6-powered Sebrings. This one is selling at no reserve. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Mantide

2009 Bertone Mantide

Offered by Worldwide Auctioneers | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 15, 2020

Photo – Worldwide Auctioneers

Let’s start by stating that “Mantide” is a ridiculous name for anything, including a car (it means “Mantis” in Italian). The Bertone Mantide is a concept car produced by Bertone in 2009. They initially planned to build a run of 10 examples, but only one was ever completed.

It is based on the contemporary Chevrolet Corvette ZR1, which means the engine is up front. That engine is a supercharged 6.2-liter V8 that makes 638 horsepower. Top speed is 218 mph. The car was shown at the 2009 Shanghai Auto Show – and it was originally red.

Its first owner had it repainted white, and the car was later shown at The Quail, where it won the supercar class. In an era of limited-run supercars, it seems relatively easy to come across an example that never got past the prototype stage. But it’s not so easy to actually get a chance to acquire one. You can read more about this car here and see more from Worldwide Auctioneers here.

Zagato Mostro

2016 Zagato Mostro Coupe

Offered by Bonhams | Paris, France | February 6, 2020

Photo – Bonhams

Did you know this car existed? Five examples were built by Zagato between 2015 and 2016 to commemorate 100 years of Maserati and the 1957 Maserati 450 S Coupe Zagato Monster.

It’s designed primarily for the track (look at that big rear wing) and has a very post-2000 Zagato body. Also, it has butterfly-like doors, which is kind of cool. It’s powered by a front-mid-engined 4.2-liter Maserati V8 good for 460 horsepower.

It was over $1 million when new and is now expected to fetch between $670,000-$1,000,000 at auction in Paris. It’s a one-owner example of a car that Zagato only offered to their best customers. You may never get another chance to get your hands on one. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Chrysler Prowler

2001 Chrysler Prowler Mulholland Edition

Offered by Mecum | Kissimmee, Florida | January 8, 2020

Photo – Mecum

Listen. The Prowler is cool. All of you old folks who hate that it “doesn’t have a V8” are missing the point. Go drive your hot rods that are quickly depreciating. The Prowler, with its 3.5-liter V6, was poster-worthy when it debuted for the 1997 model year.

Interestingly, the Plymouth brand was axed after the 2000 model year. So Chrysler picked up the torch, and “Chrysler Prowlers” were sold in 2001 and 2002. In all, 11,702 Prowlers were built, 3,170 of which were Chrysler-branded. The Mulholland Edition brought special Midnight Blue paint with a dark blue soft top. Only 1,278 cars were finished in this color.

That 3.5-liter V6 was good for 253 horsepower. Yes, it has an automatic transmission, but the car comes in at about 2,800 pounds. If you’re still not convinced of this car being cool, just look at it. This will never happen again. Chrysler had balls in the 90s and 2000s. They built some wild stuff. It just can’t happen anymore. Get ’em while you can, as my prediction for the last few years has been that these are going to take off big time in the next 15-20 years. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $27,500.

Wiesmann MF30

2001 Wiesmann MF30 Roadster

Offered by Oldtimer Galerie | Gstaad, Switzerland | December 29, 2019

Photo – Oldtimer Galerie

There have been a slew (three) of Wiesmanns being auctioned lately. And each of the three has been a different model. The MF30 was the company’s first product and was followed up by the MF3.

It’s powered by a 3.0-liter BMW inline-six good for 228 horsepower and 221 lb-ft of torque. It hit 60 mph in about five seconds and topped out at 143 mph.

This car is listed in the auction catalog as an MF3, which would’ve been powered by a 3.2-liter inline-six. The earlier MF30 was the 3.0-liter version, which is why I have it listed as such. There really aren’t many external differences between the two. No estimate is yet available, but you can see more here and see more from this sale here.

550 GTZ Barchetta

2001 Ferrari 550 GTZ Barchetta by Zagato

Offered by Bonhams | London, U.K. | December 7, 2019

Photo – Bonhams

The Ferrari 550 Maranello was produced between 1996 and 2002. In 2000, the company launched the 550 Barchetta, a convertible version that marked Ferrari’s fun new business of chopping the top and jacking up the price for a limited-edition model. Only 448 Barchetta examples were built.

This one was later customized by coachbuilder Zagato. It was actually developed with Ferrari as a convertible variant of the 575 GTZ, which itself was a Zagato-modified version of the 550’s followup car, the 575M Maranello. Because the 575 Superamerica (the 575’s expensive drop-top version) had yet to enter production, they backtracked to the 550 Barchetta to built the drop-top 575 Zagato.

When new, this car cost $1 million. It’s powered by a 478 horsepower, 5.5-liter V12. They planned to build five, but only three were completed. And this is the only right-hand-drive example. The pre-sale estimate is $640,000-$900,000, and you can read more about it here. See more from Bonhams in London here.

Update: Sold $769,393.

Wiesmann MF5 Roadster

2010 Wiesmann GT MF5 Roadster

Offered by Coys | London, U.K. | December 4, 2019

Photo – Coys

Wiesmanns are some of the coolest boutique sports cars from the last 20 years. Unfortunately, they went out of business in 2014. The last model they introduced was the GT MF5, which went on sale in 2009.

It’s powered by a monster 5.0-liter V10 from BMW that puts out 547 horsepower. Sixty arrived in 3.9 seconds, and the car topped out at 193 mph. What happened during production of the MF5 was that BMW discontinued the V10-powered M5 and M6, so many of the MF5s ended up with V8s.

Only 55 MF5 roadsters were built, but as few as 10 were finished with the V10 engine, making this a rare supercar. You can read more about it here and see more from this sale here.

Ferrari 456 Spider

1995 Ferrari 456 GT Straman Spider

Offered by Worldwide Auctioneers | Riyadh, Saudi Arabia | November 23, 2019

Photo – Worldwide Auctioneers

The Ferrari 456 was Ferrari’s sensible four-seater that was produced between 1992 and 2003. They have aged well, and I quite like them. What Ferrari did not do was produce a convertible. Yet here we are.

Convertibles, wagons, sedans, and targas were all produced off of the 456 by aftermarket manufacturers. In this case, the R. Straman Company of California produced approximately three drop-top versions of the car. This one is believed to have been owned by Mike Tyson.

It is powered by a 556 horsepower, supercharged 5.5-liter V12. That supercharger is not stock. It’s the perfect car for some rich dude in the Middle East, which is where this is being offered by Worldwide Auctioneers. You can read more about it here and see more from this sale here.