Alpine A610

1991 Alpine A610

Offered by Artcurial | Paris, France | October 24, 2021

Photo – Artcurial

The A610 was the last Alpine before Renault recently relaunched the brand. It was sort of an evolution of the Renault-Alpine GTA and was produced between 1991 and 1995. Only 818 examples were produced during that time, making the car pretty rare today.

The turbocharged 3.0-liter V6 is mounted out back of the 2+2 cabin. Output was rated at 247 horsepower when new, which was enough to propel the car to a 165-mph top end. This car is actually pretty interesting and unusual. A great 90s sleeper sports car.

This particular car has remained with a single owner since new. That owner was an Alpine racing driver who had the factory turn up the boost, delete the A/C, and pop in an ABS override button. The pre-sale estimate here is $40,000-$57,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Ferrari F60 America

2016 Ferrari F60 America

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Monterey, California | August 12-14, 2021

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Going back 20 years, Ferrari has created limited-edition drop-top models of its front-engined V12 grand tourers. It started with the 550 Barchetta and progressed through the 575 Superamerica, 599 SA Aperta, and this, the F60 America.

It’s based upon the F12berlinetta, which went on sale in 2012. The F60 was introduced in late 2014 and was out of production by the end of F12 production in 2017. Only 10 examples were produced to pay homage to the 10 units of the US-only NART Spyder. The name F60 was chosen to celebrate 60 years of Ferrari in America. All 10 were sold before Ferrari even introduced it.

Power is from a 6.3-liter V12 rated at 730 horsepower. The F60 features a fabric soft top and a three-piece carbon-fiber hardtop, depending on what look you are going for. I’m sure this car was insanely expensive when new, and it’s likely still an easy seven-figure car today. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $3,635,000.

BMW Z8

2001 BMW Z8

Offered by Mecum | Monterey, California | August 14, 2021

Photo – Mecum

The Z8 was BMW’s retro-inspired halo car that was sold between 2000 and 2002, with a revised Alpina Roadster available for 2003. The car was styled after BMW’s legendary 507 (one of, if not the first, car this site featured was a 507).

Power is from a 4.9-liter V8 rated at 395 horsepower. It could hit 60 in 4.2 seconds and was limited to a 155-mph top end. This car retains its factory body-color hardtop and is one of 62 built finished in red over Crema leather. A total of 5,703 Z8s were produced. While they are sought after today, their $128,000 base price when new did not move them off of dealer lots quickly 20 years ago.

That said, good luck picking one up for under $150,000 today. They’ve aged pretty well and are certainly a future classic. Click here for more info on this one, and here for more from Mecum in Monterey.

Update: Sold $247,500.

Ferrari 512 BB

1979 Ferrari 512 BB

Offered by Silverstone Auctions | Sywell, U.K. | June 5, 2021

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

Ferrari’s Berlinetta Boxer debuted as the 365 GT/4 in 1973. It looked pretty much like this, but it shared its numerical designation with the car it replaced, the 365 GTB/4. It was the first mid-engined Ferrari road car and began the line of flat-12 powered sports cars from the company that would last into the mid-1990s.

The 512 replaced the 365 GT/4 in 1976. It is powered by a carbureted 4.9-liter flat-12 rated at 355 horsepower. It would remain in production until being replaced by the fuel-injected version (the 512 BBi) in 1981. Just 929 carbureted examples were built, which makes it slightly rarer than the injected version.

This car is one of 101 right-hand-drive carbureted models and was restored in 2015. No pre-sale estimate is available, but you can read more about it here and see more from Silverstone Auctions all-Ferrari sale here.

Update: Not sold.

SECMA F16

2009 SECMA F16

Offered by Bonhams | Bicester, U.K. | May 22, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

SECMA (which stands of Societe d’Etude et Construction Mecanique Automobile) is a French microcar manufacturer that was founded in 1995 by Daniel Renard in Lambres, France. Many of their initial models were very small, with some essentially just looking like four-wheeler ATVs with doors.

The F16 was launched in 2009 and is a street-legal buggy-style sports car. Most of these French microcars are powered by like 20-horsepower lawnmower engines. Not this bad boy. It has a rear-mounted 1.6-liter Renault inline-four making 103 horsepower. It also has a five-speed manual gearbox and rear-wheel drive. Decent sporting credentials for a car weighing about 1,200 pounds.

There has since been a re-styled F16 Turbo model introduced. This naturally aspirated F16 actually looks kind of fun. And no one would know what in the world you were driving. It should sell for between $13,000-$17,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $9,315.

Evante Mk I

1988 Evante Mk I

Offered by Historics Auctioneers | Ascot, U.K. | May 15, 2021

Photo – Historics Auctioneers

Evante Cars Ltd was founded by George Walter Robinson in Spalding, England, in 1987 as an offshoot of Vegantune, a restorer of Lotus Elans. Vegantune found opportunities for improving the Elan, thus the formation of Evante to build a “modern” Elan.

The Evante roughly shares the Elan’s looks and is bodied in fiberglass over a tubular steel spaceframe chassis. This car is powered by a Ford-based 1.7-liter inline-four rated at 170 horsepower. The cars were built to order at a time when the global economy was in a recession. So it didn’t go great.

Production stopped in 1991, and the rights to the design passed between a few other companies over the years, with an Evante Mk II appearing later on in the 1990s. This Vegantune-era example carries a pre-sale estimate of $16,000-$22,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $16,811.

TVR 290S

1992 TVR S3 290S

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | March 27-April 1, 2021

Photo – Brightwells

TVR produced an “S” series of cars between 1986 and 1994. They were the transition between the wedge-shaped TVRs of the 1980s and the insanity of the 1990s. There were four “S” cars powered by V6s, and there was the V8S.

The S2, S3, and S4 all shared the same 168-horsepower, 2.9-liter Ford V6. The changes between the series were mostly cosmetic (or emissions-related), and the S3 was launched in 1990. It got a stiffer chassis than earlier cars as well as longer doors and an interior redesign.

Only 887 examples of the S3 were built through 1992, making it the most common of the S cars. But, uh, they are still not common at all. This is a cheap way into TVR ownership (though there is nothing saying that TVR ownership will remain cheap). The pre-sale estimate is just $8,700-$10,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $8,524.

Jaguar XJS Celebration

1995 Jaguar XJS Celebration Convertible

Offered by Historics Auctioneers | Ascot Racecourse, U.K. | April 17, 2021

Photo – Historics Auctioneers

The XJS was Jaguar’s follow-up to the E-Type. Introduced in 1975, variants of the car would remain in production through 1996. The final generation of the XJS launched in 1991, and two different engines were available: a 4.0-liter inline-six or a 5.3-liter V12.

This car, sadly, has the six, which was rated at 237 horsepower when new. I’ve always felt like if you’re going to buy one of these, you might as well get the overly-complicated and still-not-that-much-more-powerful V12. Bragging rights. So why are we featuring this car? Because it’s a wonderful shade of teal. That’s why.

The Celebration edition, I think, was to celebrate that Jaguar had saved on development costs by not completely redesigning this car after 20 years. They built 115,413 XJS cars in 21 years, which is pretty impressive. This one has about 10,000 original miles and should sell for between $34,800-$41,700. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $62,605.

HSV VS GTS-R

1996 Holden HSV VS GTS-R

Offered by Webb’s | Paraparaumu, New Zealand | March 21, 2021

Photo – Webb’s

Body styles of Australian vehicles changed like every three years. It was like how the Americans did it in the 60s. The “VS” was the I-don’t-even-know-what generation of the Holden Commodore, and it was produced between 1995 and 1997 (although the Ute stayed in production through 2000).

HSV – or Holden Special Vehicles – is Holden’s badass car arm, like an Australian SVT or AMG. They produced a few versions of the VS Commodore, including the GTS. Well, they upped that to GTS-R spec in 1996. It’s powered by a 5.7-liter stroker V8 rated at 288 horsepower and mated to a six-speed manual transmission and a limited-slip rear differential. Hot stuff for 1996.

Only 85 were built, 10 of which went to New Zealand. This is one of those. It was first registered in 2008 and is said to be one of four of the 10 New Zealand cars that have remained there. The pre-sale estimate is $165,000-$185,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Honda NSX

1995 Honda NSX

Offered by Bonhams | Paris, France | March 3, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

It’s always weird when manufacturers adorn cars with different branding based on where they are sold. The NSX is an Acura product in North America. But pretty much everywhere else in the world, it’s a Honda. And this Honda NSX is from the middle of the first generation. It was delivered new to France, so it’s left-hand drive, but it’s also 25 years old. That means you can bring it to the U.S.

The first-gen NSX is an appreciating classic. It’s one of the last wonderfully analog cars. In 1995, the NSX was still two years away from a displacement increase and a power bump, and the 3.0-liter V6 in this car was rated at 270 horsepower.

There are more desirable and interesting colors, but you can’t really go wrong with red on a two-door, mid-engine sports car. This 15,000-mile example should sell for between $67,000-$91,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $68,373.