Kuzma-Offenhauser

1961 Kuzma-Offenhauser

Offered by Barrett-Jackson | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 11-19, 2020

Photo – Barrett-Jackson

Eddie Kuzma built Indy roadsters in the 1950s and early 1960s. Kuzma won the 500 in 1952 with driver Troy Ruttman, the youngest person to ever win the race. Ruttman actually ran this very car at Indy in 1963, where he finished 12th.

This is a “lay-down” Indy roadster, meaning the 4.2-liter Offenhauser engine is laid on its side, protruding from the bodywork. This both reduced drag and increased the left-side weight bias, making it faster around ovals. The car was not used in USAC after 1963 (the rear-engined cars had arrived). Instead, it went east, where it was used as a super modified.

Unfortunately, Ruttman’s son, Troy Jr., was killed driving this car in an accident at Pocono in 1969. The car was purchased by Bob McConnell in 1980 and was restored by a later owner in 2004. The catalog lists this as a 1963 but also states it was built in 1961. Not really sure which is correct. Anyway, it is selling at no reserve. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Ferrari 126 C2

1982 Ferrari 126 C2

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Abu Dhabi, U.A.E. | November 30, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The 126C was Ferrari’s 1981 Formula One car. It replaced the 312T series of cars that dated back to 1975. For 1982, the chassis was heavily updated to C2 specification, and it was iterated upon thereafter through 1984.

Power is from a turbocharged 1.5-liter V6 that made about 600 horsepower in race trim. Driving duties for 1982 were split between Gilles Villeneuve (who died mid-season), Didier Pironi, Patrick Tambay, and Mario Andretti. No single driver competed in every race. The competition history for this chassis includes:

  • 1982 British Grand Prix – 3rd (with Patrick Tambay)
  • 1982 French Grand Prix – 4th (with Tambay)
  • 1982 German Grand Prix – 1st (with Tambay)
  • 1982 Italian Grand Prix – 3rd (with Mario Andretti)
  • 1982 Caesars Palace Grand Prix (Las Vegas) – 19th, DNF (with Andretti)

The car left Ferrari’s private collection in 2000 and has been used in events since. This race-winning F1 car from the Scuderia is the only survivor of seven examples of the type built. It should sell for between $2,000,000-$2,500,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $2,143,750.

FXX-K

2015 Ferrari FXX-K

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Abu Dhabi, U.A.E. | November 30, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The “XX” series of Ferrari cars began with the Ferrari FXX, which was an Enzo-based track day car offered to select clients. It was later Evolution-ized and followed up with a 599-based XX car. Then the LaFerrari came about, giving Ferrari an entirely new canvas to create a monster track car.

And that’s what the FXX-K is. Power is from a 6.3-liter V12 paired with an F1-style KERS electric motor, all of which is good for a combined system output of 1,036 horsepower. It’ll top out at 217 mph. An Evo version was introduced in late 2017 and is even quicker.

Only 40 were built between 2015 and 2017. When they were introduced, like the other XX cars before it, they were “owned” by an owner, but retained by Ferrari for the owner’s use at tracks all over the world. It’s unclear if that is still the case or if you get to take this home with you. Regardless, it is expected to fetch between $4,000,000-$4,500,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this auction.

Update: Sold $4,281,250.

Arrows A21

2000 Arrows A21

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | London, U.K. | October 24, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Arrows Grand Prix International was an active F1 team between 1978 and 2002. They never won a race, and by 2000 they weren’t in the best position on the grid, literally and figuratively. Drivers Jos Verstappen and Pedro de la Rosa managed a best result of 4th all season.

The A21 was their car for 2000. Originally, it was powered by a 3.0-liter V10 from Supertec. Now it has a 3.0-liter Cosworth AC V8, which is probably much more reliable, even if it was built 25 years ago. The AC carried a rating of about 500 horsepower when new. The competition history for this chassis includes:

  • 2000 Belgian Grand Prix – 16th (with Pedro de la Rosa)
  • 2000 Italian Grand Prix – 21st, DNF (with de la Rosa)

And that was it for A21 chassis no. 05. It was later rebuilt after the accident at Monza and is now being offered alongside another A21 at RM’s sale. It’s like a turn-key F1 team from 20 years ago. Get after it! Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $92,194.

Fiat-Daniela

1950 Fiat-Daniela 750 Testa d’Oro

Offered by Bonhams | Philadelphia, Pennsylvania | October 7, 2019

Photo – Bonhams

Small Fiats were the basis for many Italian sports cars after WWII. What quite a few enterprising individuals did was take a Fiat 500, bore it out to 750cc, replace some other internals, and go racing.

Daniela built five or six cars powered by 750cc Fiat engines. This car’s original engine went missing, and it’s now powered by a 105 horsepower, 1.1-liter Fiat inline-four. It hasn’t really been used much since the 1990s and is begging for restoration.

A previous owner had the car from 1958 through 1990, during which time it was raced in Nassau, Watkins Glen, Bridgehampton, and Lime Rock. It’s a pretty cool little thing and should sell for between $35,000-$45,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $106,400.

Impreza WRC

2003 Subaru Impreza WRC2003

For Sale at Girardo & Co.

Photo – Girardo & Co.

Yes, I know. The lead photo for this should be the car flying through the air on a rally stage in the middle of the forest. Want to know why that is not the case? Because this car has been very nicely restored and is now worth a lot of money (though Girardo & Co. do have some cool period competition photos for this car on their website, link below).

Creatively-named, the WRC2003 was Subaru’s 2003 entrant in the World Rally Championship. This car was built by WRC experts Prodrive, and the “standard” WRC2003 was powered by a turbocharged 2.0-liter flat-four capable of about 300 horsepower in competition form.

Subaru’s drivers in 2003 included the legendary Petter Solberg, who went on to win the drivers’ championship that year in a WRC2003. After the season, this car was sold into private hands, where it spent the next decade competing in England and Barbados, of all places.

It was restored in 2018 and wears its 2003 Monte Carlo Rally livery. It’s for sale in England now – where it is road registered! Imagine someone blasting past you in this. Wait. Imagine blasting past someone else in this. That’s better. Check out more about this car here.

Ferrari 412 T1

1994 Ferrari 412 T1

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | London, U.K. | October 24, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The 412 T1 was Ferrari’s Formula One car for the 1994 season. Mid-way through the season, the cars were heavily updated and were later dubbed 412 T1B. The 412 T2 would replace the car for 1995. Ferrari’s drivers for 1994 were Gerhard Berger and Jean Alesi, the latter of whom would be replaced for two races by Nicola Larini after Alesi had a massive testing crash.

This car is powered by a 3.5-liter V12. It is the second of eight examples built, and it was primarily used as a testing car throughout the season. Its competition history includes:

  • 1994 Brazilian Grand Prix – 3rd (with Jean Alesi)
  • 1994 Italian Grand Prix – 2nd (with Gerhard Berger)

The car has had two private owners since Ferrari sold it into public hands in 2002. It is in running order and will cross the block in London late next month. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

935 K3

1978 Porsche 935 K3

For Sale at Girardo & Co.

Photo – Girardo & Co.

The Porsche 935 was a factory racing version of the 911 Turbo, aka the 930. It was built for competition in the FIA’s Group 5 category, hence the 935 designation. Porsche launched it with the 935/76 in 1976, followed by the 935/77, which included customer cars.

Porsche updated it one more time in 1978 before moving on to other projects. Fortunately, for those still interested in a car that continued to dominate, Kremer Racing was building their own versions of Porsche’s 935 Evolution models. The K2, K3, and K4 versions of the 935 were available from Kremer 1977 through about 1980. A K3 like this one won Le Mans outright in 1979.

This car started life as one of about 24 factory 935s built for customers. It was delivered in the US in 1978 and raced for a few years before being upgraded to Kremer K3 specification later on. K3 spec normally meant a twin-turbocharged 3.2-liter flat-six capable of more than 740 horsepower. The competition history for this chassis includes:

  • 1979 24 Hours of Daytona – 61st, DNF (with Preston Henn)
  • 1979 12 Hours of Sebring – 26th, DNF (with Henn, Hurley Haywood, and Peter Gregg)
  • 1980 24 Hours of Daytona – 2nd (with Henn, John Paul Sr., and Al Holbert)
  • 1980 12 Hours of Sebring – 4th (with Henn, Paul Sr., and Holbert)
  • 1981 24 Hours of Daytona – 64th, DNF (with Henn and Bob Bondurant)
  • 1981 12 Hours of Sebring – 48th, DNF (with Henn, John Gunn, and Gary Belcher)

Henn, who owned the car, sold it in 1982. It then had a lengthy career int he SCCA. It’s eligible for historic racing events the world over, and you can read more about the car here.

Wolverine Can-Am

1965 Wolverine-Chevrolet LD65

Offered by Bonhams | Chichester, U.K. | September 14, 2019

Photo – Bonhams

Can-Am’s debut season was 1966. But it wasn’t a surprise. Driver Jerry Hansen knew it was coming and got together with two engineers from GM to design and build a race car for him for the ’66 season.

Lee Dykstra (for whom the car appears to be named) and George Anderson designed this, the Wolverine. It has a tube spaceframe chassis and a small-block Chevrolet V8. An aluminum body was constructed, but over time the rear section has been replaced with fiberglass.

Hansen entered the car in the first Can-Am race, where he finished 20th. It also ran in SCCA events that year, but for 1967, Hansen upgraded to a McLaren. The Wolverine passed between a few other owners and was entered in Can-Am races through 1970.

They intended to build three of these, but only one was completed. The current owner bought the car in a series of boxes and had it completely rebuilt since 2010. It’s been at the Goodwood Revival and Monterey Motorsports Reunion. It should now sell for between $98,000-$110,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $99,254.

Epperly-Offenhauser Streamliner

1955 Epperly-Offenhauser Streamliner

Offered by Worldwide Auctioneers | Auburn, Indiana | August 31, 2019

Photo – Worldwide Auctioneers

Though not as well-known, Quin Epperly is a name that sits right there with Frank Kurtis, A.J. Watson, Eddie Kuzma, and Lujie Lesovsky when it comes to legendary builders of race cars during the “Roadster” era of the Indianapolis 500. Epperly actually worked for Kurtis before opening his own shop in the mid-1950s. His cars appeared at Indy from 1955 through 1960 and beyond.

The history of this car is interesting. Howard Keck had just won two consecutive 500s with Bill Vukovich driving his cars and was going for number three in 1955. Epperly had designed this streamlined special for Vuky to drive, but it wasn’t completed in time for the race. Instead, Vukovich drove a Kurtis for another owner. He was killed while leading the race.

Epperly completed the car with Keck’s help (money) anyway and installed a 385 horsepower, 4.4-liter Offenhauser inline-four instead of the V8 that was originally planned. IMS president Tony Hulman knew of the car and wanted it in the ’56 race, paying the entry fee for it in advance. But with Vukovich’s death, Keck lost all interest in racing and the car ended up stored in his shop until 1985.

The car became more or less legend until it was purchased and restored in 1990. And now it’s being offered for public sale. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $385,000.