B53 Aurelia

1952 Lancia Aurelia B53 Cabriolet by Pinin Farina

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Berkshire, U.K. | June 2024

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Lancia Aurelia was the first production car with a V6 engine. It was offered between 1950 and 1958, and during that time, the company produced more than a dozen different chassis codes across six series. There are a whole lot of different Aurelias.

This is a B53 chassis, which were only produced in 1952. In fact, only 86 B53s were made. The B53 was powered by a 2.0-liter V6 that made 70 horsepower. It was a chassis for coachbuilders, and this one was bodied by Pinin Farina.

The restoration was completed between 2006 and 2008, and it now has an estimate of $85,000-$110,000. More info can be found here.

Aurelia B20 GT

1957 Lancia Aurelia B20 GT Coupe Series VI

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | London, U.K. | November 4, 2023

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Designer extraordinaire Vittorio Jano oversaw the development of the Lancia Aurelia, which was the first production car powered by a V6 engine. It debuted in 1950, and the two-door B20 GT Coupe arrived a year later, with a body designed be Felice Boano at Ghia. The bodies were actually built by Pinin Farina.

The car was produced in six different series. This car is from the last of them and was produced in the Aurelia’s penultimate model year. Power is from a 2.5-liter V6 rated at about 110 horsepower.

Just 2,650 examples of the B20 GT with the 2.5-liter engine were built across six years. This one was sold new in the U.K. and was restored in Italy. Only 25 Series VI cars went to the U.K., making this a rare subspecies. Anyway, it has an estimate of $100,000-$120,000. Click here for more info.

Lancia Theta

1915 Lancia Theta Hydroplane Runabout

Offered by H&H Classics | Duxford, U.K. | June 14, 2023

Photo – H&H Classics

Lancia has long had a thing for the Greek alphabet. In 1913, when the Theta was introduced, the company also had the smaller Zeta and larger Eta on sale – all four-cylinder cars. The Theta would remain available through 1918. About 1,700 were made.

Power is from a 4.9-liter inline-four that made 70 horsepower. It was a powerful car for its day – and a fast one. The top speed was up to 75 mph. This was also the first European car to be fitted with an electric starter.

This car was sold new in the U.S. and is believed to retain its original American-supplied coachwork. It later resided in the Harrah collection. It returned to the U.K. in 1981 and later received a decades-long refurb that started in the 1990s. It now has an estimate of $150,000-$175,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold.

Lancia Dilambda

1930 Lancia Dilambda Cabriolet by Carlton

Offered by Bring a Trailer Auctions | March 2023

Photo – Bring a Trailer Auctions

The Lambda was a car produced by Lancia between 1922 and 1931, and it was powered by a V4 engine. The short-lived Trikappa of 1922-1925 was the first Lancia powered by a narrow-angle V8. It’s successor, the V8-powered Dilambda, is what we have here. It’s like “two Lambdas” in terms of engine capacity. It was sold from 1928 through 1935.

The engine is a 4.0-liter V8 that made about 100 horsepower. Just 1,104 were built in the first series through 1931. This was Lancia’s halo car during its run. And this particular one was bodied by the Carlton Carriage Company in London. The result is very English and very good looking.

The history of the car includes being stored during WWII, refurbished about 5-6 years ago, and then driven across the U.S. on its way to Pebble Beach. The dealer selling this car has dropped some pretty fantastic photos of the car on its cross-continent journey. You can take a look at them here.

Update: Sold $307,000.

Lancia Augusta

1935 Lancia Augusta Sedan

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | December 3, 2022

Photo – Brightwells

The Lancia Augusta was a small car produced by the company between 1933 and 1936. Offered mainly as a four-door sedan, the car was also built at Lancia’s French factory. French-built cars were called the Belna and could be had with fancy coachbuilt bodies.

Power is from a 1.2-liter V4 rated at 35 horsepower. In all, 17,217 Augustas were built before the model was replaced by the Ardea. Despite its entry-level-ness, the Augusta never really took off in Italy, and it’s sales numbers were dwarfed by the Fiat 508 Balilla.

This one was restored in the 1970s and has known history dating back to the ’60s. Another mechanical refresh was carried out in 2012, though the car is said to need a little recommissioning before use. It has an estimate of $14,000-$17,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $15,946.

Lancia Stratos

1975 Lancia Stratos HF

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | St. Moritz, Switzerland | September 9, 2022

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Lancia Stratos HF, or commonly just the Stratos, was produced from 1973 through 1975 with just 492 examples were completed in that time. The car was intended for rally competition and succeeded wildly, winning the World Rally Championship in 1974, 1975, and 1976. A Stratos also won the Targa Florio.

It has a steel space frame wrapped in a Bertone-designed fiberglass body and features a 2.4-liter Dino V6 mounted transversely behind the driver. There’s also a mini-car-like 85.8″ wheelbase with very little rear overhang. The car is small and compact and, with just 188 horsepower, can still pack a punch.

The true era of the supercar wouldn’t dawn until the 1980s, but this car certainly deserves mention in the “early supercar” conversation. This particular example was mostly totaled by its first owner and rebuilt at a Lancia dealer with a replacement chassis. With that in mind, it is still estimated at $610,000-$715,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold.

Lancia Epsilon

1912 Lancia Epsilon Victoria by Quinby

Offered by Gooding & Company | London, U.K. | September 3, 2022

Photo – Gooding & Company

Lancia followed a pretty straightforward naming convention in its early years. They started with the “Alfa” and followed the Greek alphabet straight down to Epsilon for their fifth model (not counting the Dialfa).

The Epsilon was offered in 1911 and 1912, and just 357 were made. They were likely not cheap, either. This one was imported to the U.S. when new and bodied locally by J.M. Quinby. Power is from a 4.1-liter inline-four that was rated at 60 horsepower. Three wheelbases were offered, with different body styles for each. A lot of options for such low production.

This car has been on static museum duty for some time and is not currently running. Despite this, the Epsilon was such a solid, well-built car for its day that it remains sought after today. The estimate is $150,000-$215,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold.

Flavia Sport Zagato

1965 Lancia Flavia 1800 Sport Zagato

Offered by Bonhams | Online | November 19-29, 2021

Offered by Bonhams

Lancia, once one of the world’s foremost manufacturers of interesting cars, is now reduced to a single hatchback. The Flavia was introduced in 1961 and was offered in sedan, coupe, and cabriolet form at different times throughout its production run, which wrapped in 1971, at which time the model transitioned to the 2000.

For 1963, Lancia upped the Flavia’s engine from 1.5 to 1.8 liters. The flat-four was mounted way out ahead of the front axle and produced 104 horsepower in the dual-carburetor Sport model. Alloy bodywork here is by Zagato, and this car is one of just 670 bodied by the firm.

A restoration was carried out on this car in the Netherlands in the 2000s, and it’s been in France since 2006. The pre-sale estimate is $57,000-$69,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Entire auction disappeared from Bonhams’ website.

Lancia Fulvia HF Competizione

1969 Lancia Fulvia 1600 HF Competizione

For Sale by RM Sotheby’s | Chobham, U.K.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

This prototype is about as far from a base Lancia Fulvia as you can get, style-wise. Various versions of the Fulvia were built between 1963 and 1976, including a very boxy sedan, a sporty coupe, and a Zagato-bodied Sport model.

This car actually began as a Rallye 1.6 HF model that was later modified, with updated styling by Tom Tjaarda at Ghia. It exists, apparently, by Alejandro de Tomaso wanted Ford to buy Lancia so that de Tomaso could become Lancia’s CEO. In order to do this, he needed to convince Ford that Lancia could be a Ferrari competitor.

No one was going to mistake this car’s 1.6-liter V4 for a Ferrari V12, however. Its modest 113 horsepower was not going to set any speed records, although that didn’t stop the project from setting its eyes on taking this car to Le Mans. But none of that ever happened, as Fiat heard about the plan and scooped up Lancia before anyone else had a chance.

So now this car exists as a one-off “what if” sort of thing. It is being sold through RM’s private sales, with an asking price of about $168,000. Click here for more info.

Lancia 2000 Sedan

1972 Lancia 2000 Sedan

Offered by Anglia Car Auctions | Online | Feburary 27-28, 2021

Photo – Anglia Car Auctions

Today, the barely-alive Lancia only produces badge-engineered versions of cars from other manufacturers, namely, Fiat (they’ve only made one model since 2016). You might think that this car was the start of it all, but it isn’t. It was actually designed by Lancia before they were taken over by Fiat.

The car was production-ready in 1969, the same year Fiat took control of the brand. It was never supposed to go on sale because it was expensive to build, but once Fiat realized Lancia had nothing else in the hopper, they launched it anyway in 1971. Production would continue through 1974. Both sedans and coupes were offered.

I actually quite like the look of the sedan, which is powered by a 2.0-liter flat-four (weird, right?) that made 126 horsepower when fuel injected. The injected engine, which this car has, also got an extra speed in the gearbox for a total of five. Only 14,319 sedans were built, and this 66,000-mile example should sell for between $11,000-$14,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $34,378.