Charger Daytona

1969 Dodge Charger Daytona

Offered by Mecum | Kissimmee, Florida | January 2-12, 2020

Photo – Mecum

Before the mighty Plymouth Superbird debuted in 1970, there was the 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona. Based on the Charger, the car featured a sheet metal nose cone and a big rear spoiler. These modifications were intended to help Dodge win some big NASCAR races. And it worked.

Two engines were offered: a 440 and the Hemi. While we previously featured a Hemi variant, this is our chance to showcase the “base” version, as we did a few weeks ago with the Superbird.

The standard 7.2-liter V8 made 375 horsepower. Only 543 Charger Daytonas were built in total, which makes them rarer than their Mopar cousin. This car is one of only two 440-powered cars with an automatic transmission that were finished in white. You can read more about it here and see more from this sale here.

Brabham BT26A

1968 Brabham-Cosworth BT26A

Offered by Bonhams | Amelia Island, Florida | March 7, 2019

Photo – Bonhams

Motor Racing Developments Ltd. was a Formula One constructor founded by driver Jack Brabham and engineer Ron Tauranac. It is commonly known as “Brabham.” The team competed for 30 years, between 1962 and 1992. Jack won the F1 championship in one of his own cars in 1966 – the only time that’s ever happened.

This chassis began life as a Repco-powered BT26 in 1968 with driver Jochen Rindt. The Repco was an unreliable unit, so the team switched to Cosworth power for 1969. With the new engine and some slight tweaks, the ’68 cars (including this one) were rechristened the BT26A. This car is powered by a 3.0-liter Ford-Cosworth DFV V8. It’s race history includes:

  • 1968 Canadian Grand Prix – 12th (DNF), with Jochen Rindt
  • 1968 United States Grand Prix – 11th (DNF), with Rindt
  • 1968 Mexican Grand Prix – 21st (DNF), with Rindt
  • 1969 Spanish Grand Prix – 6th, with Jacky Ickx
  • 1969 Dutch Grand Prix – 5th, with Ickx
  • 1969 French Grand Prix – 3rd, with Ickx
  • 1969 Canadian Grand Prix – 1st, with Ickx
  • 1969 Mexican Grand Prix – 2nd, with Ickx
  • 1969 Oulton Park Gold Cup – 1st, with Ickx

Not too shabby a record once the Cosworth was installed, which the car retains. It’s an impressive open-wheel car from the glory days of F1. It should bring between $1,100,000-$1,400,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Bonhams.

S/N: BT26-3

Update: Sold $1,105,000.

Alpine A110 1300 S

1969 Alpine A110 1300 S

Offered by Leclere-MDV | Paris, France | October 21, 2018

Photo – Leclere-MDV

The Alpine A110 is perhaps the most well-known car the little French company ever produced. Now part of Renault, the once-independent Alpine always had strong ties to Renault, and they built the A110 in a few different forms for almost two decades, from 1961 through 1977.

This is how they mostly looked, and we’ve previously featured a 1600 S variant. The yellow example above is powered by a 1.3-liter Renault straight-four from a Gordini R8 that makes 120 horsepower. The 1300 S (which was for “Super”) was offered between 1966 and 1971 only.

This example was recently overhauled and is ready to run. These are great-looking, great-sounding little cars. Only 868 were built, and they’re one of the best sports cars that France ever offered. This one should bring between $57,000-$80,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $105,158.

Honda S800 Coupe

1969 Honda S800 Coupe

Offered by H&H Classics | Duxford, U.K. | October 17, 2018

Photo – H&H Classics

The S800 was Honda’s third sports car, after the S500 and S600. It was the second that could be had as a coupe or convertible. We’ve previously featured an S800 Roadster and this is the much rarer coupe variant.

Introduced in 1966, the S800 is powered by a 791cc DOHC straight-four. These cars are screamers, with a tachometer that lets you rev it like it’s a superbike. Along with the Datsun Roadster, these were Japan’s answer to tiny British cars from Austin-Healey, MG, Triumph, and the like.

This 56,000-mile example has had three owners. Apparently, it has a starter issue, so it will need a little work before being roadworthy. Only 11,536 S800s were built, many of them drop-tops. This rare coupe should bring between $14,000-$17,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $17,615.

Soviet Microcars

Three Soviet Microcars

Offered by Brightwells | Leominster, U.K. | September 26, 2018


1969 ZAZ-965A

Photo – Brightwells

The Zaporizhia Automobile Plant in Ukraine has been producing cars under the ZAZ brand since 1960. They’ve also built cars from other manufacturers for local sale and built some heavy trucks and buses as well.

Zaporozhets were a series of microcars produced between 1960 and 1994, with the ZAZ-965 built in two series between 1960 and 1969. This car is listed in the catalog as a 1969 965. But the 1969 model was actually the ZAZ-965A. It’s powered by a rear-mounted 887cc V-4 capable of 27 horsepower.

When production ended in 1969, 322,116 examples of all types had been built. This car was imported to the U.K. from Lithuania and is all-original. You can read more here.

Update: Sold $475.


1987 SMZ S-3d

Photo – Brightwells

The SMZ was a microcar built in Russia and between 1970 and 1997 they built a car called the S-3d – this. Based on the ZAZ 695, it features a 346cc single-cylinder engine from an earlier model. Designed as a car for invalids, this car was technically classified as a motorcycle in Russia.

They built 223,051 of these – quite a lot – but they still aren’t that common. This original example was imported into the U.K. from Lithuania in 2016 and will sell at no reserve. Click here for more from Brightwells.

Update: Sold $719.


1967 ZAZ-968A

Photo – Brightwells

Here’s another Lithuanian import into the U.K. from the same collection. It’s another Zaporozhets, but slightly larger than the ZAZ-965. The “second generation” of these cars were introduced in 1966 as the ZAZ-966. It would evolve into the ZAZ-968 in 1971 and this model would last through 1980, while the later 968M would last through 1994.

Power here is from a 1.2-liter V4 capable of 30 horsepower. The 968A was actually built between 1973 and 1980 and had some safety improvements, like a plastic dashboard instead of a metal one designed for maximum carnage. This one is also no reserve. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $719.

Porsche 914/6 Murene Prototype

1969 Porsche 914/6 Murene by Heuliez

Offered by Osenat | Strasbourg, France | May 1, 2018

Photo – Osenat

The Porsche 914 was a sports car designed in collaboration with Volkswagen. It went on sale in 1969 and was built through 1976. It’s mid-engined and came with a flat-four or a flat-six in 914/6 configuration.

This car is unlike any other 914. First of all, it’s a closed coupe and not a targa, as the 914 was from the factory. It was designed by Jacques Cooper (who also designed the original French TGV high-speed train) and he took the design to Heuliez who had a car mocked up and then built.

It debuted at the 1970 Paris Motor Show and still used a 2.0-liter flat-six that makes 109 horsepower. Porsche was working with Karmann to build the cars and didn’t want to split the duties between two coachbuilders. Heuliez bought the car from the firm that Cooper was working for when he designed it and kept it until 2012 when they liquidated most of their collection. Since its recent acquisition, the new owner went through the car mechanically and made it fit to drive. It’s a one-off, coachbuilt Porsche Prototype and it should bring between $225,000-$275,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

1969 Coronet Wagon

1969 Dodge Coronet 500 Wagon

Offered by Mecum | Las Vegas, Nevada | November 16-18, 2017

Photo – Mecum

This style of station wagon was really the last hurrah for the classic, huge American Family Truckster. In another decade or so minivans would be the vehicle of choice for families and behemoths like this were relegated to the scrap heap. Luckily, someone saved this big boxy family hauler.

Dodge’s 1969 four-door model lineup included the Coronet and the Polara/Monaco. Four-door Coronets were available in base Deluxe trim, mid-level 440 trim, or as a top-trim 500. This nine-passenger Coronet 500 Wagon was the best Coronet family carrier you could buy. It’s powered by a 6.3-liter V-8 making 300 horsepower. Only 991 of these were even sold in 1969, making this extremely rare today. The original base price was $3,392. You can read more about it here and see more from Mecum in Vegas here.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $13,000.

Update: Sold, Mecum Kissimmee 2018, $19,800.

Three Decades of American Wagons

Three Decades of American Wagons

Offered by Mecum | Las Vegas, Nevada | November 16-18, 2017


1948 Buick Super Estate Wagon

Photo – Mecum

The Buick Super was first introduced in 1940 and it only lasted a little over a year before the war broke out, though an upgraded 1942 model was brought to market. This model was built through 1948, which makes this car from the final year of manufacture for that series. The Super was Buick’s mid-level model for ’48 and four body styles were offered, with the Wagon you see here being the rarest.

The Model 59 was actually the “Estate Wagon” and it featured this beautiful woodwork from Ionia. It’s powered by a 5.2-liter V-8 making 115 horsepower. It’s a wonderful car sporting a 20+ year old restoration and a prime example of functional post-war Americana: a V-8 woody wagon. Only 2,018 of these were built. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $26,000.

Update: Sold, Mecum Kissimmee 2018, $29,700.


1953 Chrysler New Yorker Town & Country

Photo – Mecum

The first two generations of the Chrysler Town & Country were woodies. The last year for those was 1950 and for the 1951 model year, the name was applied to Chrysler’s station wagons (and would continue on their wagons through 1988 before becoming a minivan in 1990).

Chrysler’s 1953 model offerings included the six-cylinder Windsor and the eight-cylinder New Yorker. This car is powered by the New Yorker’s 5.4-liter V-8 making 180 horsepower. Only 1,399 of these were built in 1953 and they cost $4,077 when new. Read more about this one here.

Update: Sold $48,000


1969 Dodge Coronet 500 Wagon

Photo – Mecum

This style of station wagon was really the last hurrah for the classic, huge American Family Truckster. In another decade or so minivans would be the vehicle of choice for families and behemoths like this were relegated to the scrap heap. Luckily, someone saved this big boxy family hauler.

Dodge’s 1969 four-door model lineup included the Coronet and the Polara/Monaco. Four-door Coronets were available in base Deluxe trim, mid-level 440 trim, or as a top-trim 500. This nine-passenger Coronet 500 Wagon was the best Coronet family carrier you could buy. It’s powered by a 6.3-liter V-8 making 300 horsepower. Only 991 of these were even sold in 1969, making this extremely rare today. The original base price was $3,392. You can read more about it here and see more from Mecum in Vegas here.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $13,000.

Update: Sold, Mecum Kissimmee 2018, $19,800.

Torino Talladega

1969 Ford Torino Talladega

Offered by Barrett-Jackson | Palm Beach, Florida | April 6-8, 2017

Photo – Barrett-Jackson

The 1969 Ford Torino was actually the last Torino produced as a sub series of the Ford Fairlane. It would become a model in its own right for 1970. So, I guess, this is technically a 1969 Ford Fairlane Torino Talladega. The Torino was the top trim for the Fairlane, above the 500. The Talladega was a limited edition fastback produced by Ford for 1969 only.

The point of the car, of which Ford only built in the first few weeks of 1969, was to homologate their new NASCAR racer. The sloping fastback was named for the high speed racetrack of the same name (that also opened in 1969). It is powered by a 335 horsepower 7.0-liter 428 Cobra Jet V-8.

This is a classic, super rare muscle car. It’s a factory racing special and while most would mistake it for just another 1960s sports coupe, it’s that big fastback that gives it away as something much more unique. Ford only built 750 of these and this was the second-to-last completed. Mercury had a version, too. Click here for more info and here for more from Barrett-Jackson in Palm Beach.

Update: Sold $41,800.

AMC AMX/3

1969 AMC AMX/3

Offered by Gooding & Company | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 21, 2017

Photo – Gooding & Company

The AMX was American Motors’ foray into the muscle and sports car arena. The AMX was among the coolest cars AMC ever built and it was also the basis for a series of concept cars that the company funded. The third such car was dubbed the AMX/3 and it was nothing like the front-engine, rear-wheel drive coupe it shared its name with.

One of the designers of this mid-engined car was Giotto Bizzarrini and the body was done by ItalDesign. AMC was quite taken with the result and initially thought they could sell 1,000 examples, but reality sank in pretty quickly and the final order was for 26 cars to be constructed in Italy by Bizzarrini. But only five were ever built (though Bizzarrini did built one more from spare parts after the fact).

Power comes from a 340 horsepower 6.4-liter V-8 and it was quick. This particular example was tested at Monza and it exceeded 160 mph. It was sold just two years later to a native of Indianapolis. The second restoration was performed at the expense of the current European owner in 2014. This is one of the rarest, most exotic American cars ever built – and it came from a company known primarily for the Gremlin. It should sell for between $900,000-$1,300,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $891,000.