Zink Z-8

1969 Zink-Volkswagen Z-8 Daytona Prototype

Offered by Gooding & Company | Pebble Beach, California | August 19-20, 2022

Photo – Gooding & Company

Ed Zink is most remembered for his Formula Vee open-wheel race cars, but in the 1960s, it was hard not to get caught up in prototype sports car racing, apparently. The Z-8 featured a space-frame chassis wrapped in fiberglass bodywork.

For power, project cheerleader and idea man Hugh Heishman (a Virginia Volkswagen dealer) turned to VW for their new Type 3E fuel-injected flat-four. The 1.9-liter unit is carbureted now and is estimated to make about 150 horsepower. The car was run in period, including:

  • 1969 24 Hours of Daytona – 18th, 3rd in class (with Bill Scott, Jim McDaniel, and Steve Pieper)
  • 1969 12 Hours of Sebring – 68th, DNF (with Scott, McDaniel, and Pieper)

It went SCCA racing in privateer hands after that, eventually being stored in a disassembled state. A restoration that completed in 2017 brought it to its current condition. Gooding estimates a price of $150,000-$200,000. Click here for more info.

21 Window Samba Bus

1966 Volkswagen Type 2 21-Window Sunroof Deluxe

Offered by Mecum | Denver, Colorado | June 8-9, 2018

Photo – Mecum

The Volkswagen Type 2 is known by many names: Bus, Microbus, Van, Kombi, Samba. The first generation was built from 1950 through 1967 (and on through 1975 in Brazil). It’s the classic 1960s van, with that giant chrome VW logo on the front and two-tone paint. VW buses are often referred to by the number of windows they have.

The standard bus had 11 windows and the Deluxe version had 15 windows. The Samba (or Sunroof Deluxe) was introduced in 1951 and it had 23 windows. In 1964, there was a slight redesign and the 15 and 23-window versions each lost a pair. As this is a 1966 model, it is a 21-window Samba. Eight of the windows on this vehicle are in the roof, thus the Sunroof designation.

This Microbus is powered by a 1.8-liter flat-four, which is likely not the original engine as first gen Type 2s never had engines that large. This is a well restored car and it is also well equipped. VW buses have shot up in value over the past seven or eight years and perfect condition 23 window Sambas now command about $125,000. We’ll see what this slightly upgraded 21-window version brings next week. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $118,250.