Bond Equipe GT 4S

1965 Bond Equipe GT 4S

Offered by H&H Classics | Buxton, U.K. | July 19, 2018

Photo – H&H Classics

We recently featured the ultimate iteration of the Bond Equipe, the 2-Litre GT. This, the GT 4S, was the second version of the car introduced. Originally, the Equipe went on sale in 1963 and the GT 4S hit the market in September of the following year. It was built through January of 1967.

It’s powered by a 1.1-liter straight-four from a Triumph Herald, tuned to make 67 horsepower here. When the GT 4S was replaced in 1967, it was replaced by a 1.3-liter variant, the 1300. The fastback body is fiberglass.

This 82,000 mile example is one of just 1,934 units product – the most of any Equipe model. It’s described as being in good overall condition, with perhaps the paint needing some attention. It should sell for between $3,000-$4,500. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Bond Equipe

1970 Bond Equipe 2-Litre GT Mk II

Offered by Oldtimer Galerie | Toffen, Switzerland | April 21, 2018

Photo – Oldtimer Galerie

Bond Cars Ltd was a British manufacturer primarily known for their three-wheeled vehicles, namely the Bond Minicar and the Bond Bug. The Equipe, which was introduced in 1963, was their first foray into the world of four-wheeled vehicles.

The Equipe was built through 1970 when Reliant, who had acquired Bond, shuttered Bond’s Preston, England, factory. There were five different Equipe models with this, the 2-Litre being available from 1967 through the end of production in 1970. A two-door Saloon and Convertible were offered. This is obviously the saloon. It’s powered by a 2.0-liter Triumph straight-four that made 95 horsepower (or 105 as the catalog states).

Styling on the 2-Litre differed rather dramatically from earlier cars and it was the final iteration of the model. In all, 591 examples of the two-door saloon were built, which makes it rarer than its convertible counterpart. This 48,000km example looks nice and will go under the hammer in Switzerland later this month. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

November 2016 Auction Highlights

The top seller from Mecum’s Dallas sale was this 1965 Shelby GT350 that went for $410,000, which means the Porsche 911 GT2 Evo we featured failed to meet its reserve.

Photo - Mecum

Photo – Mecum

But the Graham Hollywood did manage to sell, for $47,000. Click here for complete results.

Auctions America’s Hilton Head sale saw our featured Porsche Carrera GT sell for $800,000, which was more than any other car there. The Ruf RGT brought $73,700. We’ll give Most Interesting – or at least Well Bought – to this 1928 Buick Six Coupe that went for $10,450. Click here for the rest of the results.

Photo - Auctions America

Photo – Auctions America

The Delahaye we featured from Osenat’s sale blew past the upper end of its estimate, bringing $261,352. Most interesting goes to this 1959 Bond Minicar Mk F which sold for $5,880. Click here for all of the results.

Photo - Osenat

Photo – Osenat

November was the first time we featured a car from an Aguttes auction. It was a Venturi Atlantique that ended up not meeting its reserve and therefore not finding a new owner. The top sale was this 2004 Porsche Carrera GT that brought $604,737. Click here for more results.

Photo - Aguttes

Photo – Aguttes

And finally, Silverstone Auctions’ NEC Classic Motor Show Sale where the top sale was yet another Porsche, this time a 1957 Porsche 356A Speedster that was hammered away for $328,706.

Photo - Silverstone Auctions

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

The Noble M12 brought $32,568 and complete results can be found here.

Microcar Mondays Pt VIII

The Bruce Weiner Microcar Collection

Offered by RM Auctions | Madison, Georgia | February 15-16, 2013

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1958 Burgfalke FB250

1958 Burgfalke FB250

Photo – RM Auctions

The Brütsch Spatz went into production in revised form as the Victoria 250. When production ceased on that car, the head of Burgfalke (an airplane and glider manufacturer in Germany) bought the rights to the car and put it into production as the Burgfalke FB250. They used a 248cc single-cylinder making 14 horsepower. In all, 60 were built and two of those were shipped to the U.S. This car is one of those two and it is completely original. It should sell for between $25,000-$35,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $20,700.

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1949 Voisin Biscooter Prototype

1949 Voisin Biscooter Prototype

Photo – RM Auctions

We’ve talked of Gabriel Voisin and his attempt to manufacture a microcar after World War II. When he designed the Biscooter, he built approximately 15 prototypes that he shopped around. Eventually, two of them were given to Voisin to take home. This is one of those two cars. It is completely original. The Biscuter was made in Spain, but this Biscooter was made by Voisin. It’s a pretty big deal. The engine is a six horsepower 125cc single-cylinder. It should sell for between $60,000-$80,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $66,125.

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1946 Larmar

1946 Larmar

Photo – RM Auctions

Larmar built invalid carriages in Essex, England. When this model hit the scene, they were quick to point out all of its positive, road car-like characteristics in order to drum up as many sales as possible. It was about the smallest road car you could buy and perhaps the narrowest ever built, at just two feet four inches wide. The engine is a 246cc single-cylinder making 7.5 horsepower. This one has not been restored (obviously) and is missing a door, the convertible top and the folding windshield. It honestly resembles an airplane tug more than a car, but it is what it is. It can be yours for the rock-bottom price of $3,000-$5,000. Click here for more.

Update: Sold $4,600.

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1963 Vespa Ape Model C

1963 Vespa Ape

Photo – RM Auctions

The iconic Vespa scooter was introduced by Piaggio in 1946. It was great for transporting people cheaply around the windy streets of Italy. It was not so great for transporting things. So Piaggio sent their designers back to the drawing board and in 1948 the Ape came to market. This Model C has an enclosed metal box at the rear and a bench seat up front. Payload was 770 pounds – about all the 5.8 horsepower 145.5cc single-cylinder can handle. The controls are still scooter-like and the rear box actually tips. It’s a useful little commercial vehicle. It should bring between $5,000-$10,000. Click here for more.

Update: Sold $25,300.

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1948 Mochet Type K

1948 Mochet Type K

Photo – RM Auctions

This Mochet is a little sportier than the commercial Camionette we featured a month or two ago. It uses a single-cylinder engine of 125cc making a paltry 3.5 horsepower. The car is actually a little bigger than it looks, at almost eight feet long. This was the first Mochet cyclecar not to actually be fitted with pedals (what progress!). Everything else was still crude – no front suspension and an external handbrake to slow the rear wheels. And everything comes together at some kind of sharp angle. Only 650 were built. There are two in this sale, this being the nicer. It should sell for between $30,000-$40,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $35,650.

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1957 Messerschmitt KR 201 Roadster

1957 Messerschmitt KR 201 Roadster

Photo – RM Auctions

Another Messerschmitt? Look closely, this isn’t a KR 175 or a KR 200. It’s a very rare KR 201. Closed-top cars had an occupant baking problem, as they were essentially in a glass oven. Solution? Cut the top off. They gave it a heavily-raked windshield and a cloth top that goes back most of the way. It was a special edition model with other bits of nice trim and they were only built for two years (1957 and 1958) but it was available by special order until KR 200 production finally stopped. It uses the same 191cc single-cylinder engine making 9.5 horsepower. Only 300 were made. This one should bring between $60,000-$70,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $103,500.

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1972 Bond Bug 700E

1972 Bond Bug 700E

Photo – RM Auctions

The futuristic Bond Bug was exactly what a futurist would drive in 1972. It’s a three-wheeler with a pop-forward canopy for a door. The interior is now dated but was probably modern then. The engine is a 701cc straight-four making 30 horsepower. Bond had actually been acquired by Reliant in 1969 and you can see some of the Reliant Robin-type architecture in this car. Every one of the 2,276 cars built was painted in this god-awful 1970s orange color, which must have helped Bond reach their young consumer target market, or something. This one should sell for between $15,000-$20,000. Click here for more.

Update: Sold $17,250.

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1942 Peugeot VLV

1942 Peugeot VLV

Photo – RM Auctions

You might be thinking “Just what in the hell did Peugeot think they were doing trying to build a production car in 1942, under German occupation.” While the first part of that sentence – right up to the qualifier of “trying to build a production car…” is fair game at any point in their history, Peugeot actually had an interesting idea with this car. Gasoline was forbidden once Germany took over unless you had a special permission slip to drive. Literal cyclecars (without engines) were popular. Peugeot went with electricity. They were the only one of France’s large automakers to take a shot with building electric cars. The VLV was interesting – there was a single brake drum for the two rear wheels and the batteries up front made up half the weight of the car. It had a top speed of 22 mph and a range of 50 miles. It got around the fuel-restrictions but was banned by the occupying government after 377 were built. It’s cool, it’s rare. It should sell for $30,000-$40,000. Click here for more.

Update: Sold $20,125.

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1949 Crosley Farm-O-Road Prototype

1949 Crosley Farm-O-Road Prototype

Photo – RM Auctions

Powell Crosley’s cars are all really tiny and all really cool. The Farm-O-Road is one of the stranger cars the he built. It looks like a miniature version of the Jeep that helped America win the war that had just ended. But its purpose was that of a utility tractor, as Crosley “had an interest in farming.” There were all sorts of attachments for this thing: plows, mowers, skis. It was also intended for road use. They were available for three model years: 1950-1952. About 600 were made. This is one of two factory prototypes and the one that was used in factory sales literature. It uses the 724cc COBRA straight-four making 26.5 horsepower. It should sell for between $20,000-$30,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $32,775.

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1957 Iso Isettacarro 500

1957 Iso Isettacarro

Photo – RM Auctions

The Isetta was originally built by Iso. They licensed the design out all over the place and used the proceeds to build some wicked sports cars. To make the tiny bubble-car even more appealing, Iso built the Autocarro, a commercial variant available in a variety of bodystyles. This one has a wooden pickup box. It uses a 236cc single-cylinder making 9.5 horsepower. It was built in Madrid by the Spanish arm of Iso (but it’s still an Iso). The only difference is that the Autocarro was renamed Isettacarro 500 in Spain. It is one of 4,900 built and is mostly original. It should sell for between $45,000-$55,000. Click here for more info and here for the rest of the lineup, as this is the final Microcar Monday.

Update: Sold $97,750.

Bond Bug

1972 Bond Bug 700E

Offered by RM Auctions | Madison, Georgia | February 15-16, 2013

1972 Bond Bug 700E

Photo – RM Auctions

The futuristic Bond Bug was exactly what a futurist would drive in 1972. It’s a three-wheeler with a pop-forward canopy for a door. The interior is now dated but was probably modern then. The engine is a 701cc straight-four making 30 horsepower. Bond had actually been acquired by Reliant in 1969 and you can see some of the Reliant Robin-type architecture in this car. Every one of the 2,276 cars built was painted in this god-awful 1970s orange color, which must have helped Bond reach their young consumer target market, or something. This one should sell for between $15,000-$20,000. Click here for more.

Update: Sold $17,250.

Bond Minicar Mk C

1953 Bond Minicar Mk C

Offered by RM Auctions | Madison, Georgia | February 15-16, 2013

1953 Bond Minicar Mk C

Photo – RM Auctions

Only the Mark F version of the Bond Minicar outsold the Mark C – and it was by less than 100 units. In total, 6,399 Mark Cs were built between 1952 and 1956. The Mark C was a marked improvement in design and quality over the earlier Mark Bs – it looked more like a car from the front – and less like a rolling coffin. The style really fit in with the times. It used a 197cc single-cylinder making nine horsepower. There were various trim levels available – which also helped make this seem more like a real car. This one should bring between $10,000-$15,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $13,800.

Microcar Mondays Part VII

The Bruce Weiner Microcar Collection

Offered by RM Auctions | Madison, Georgia | February 15-16, 2013

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1959 King S-7

1959 King S-7

This King S-7 was not manufactured by the same “King” company we talked about last week. This one was built in Sweden. The S-7 was originally built as a Fuldamobil in Germany but they were licensed all over and some licensed versions were exported. Sweden received some NWF cars but later they built there own S-7 version of the Fuldamobil and called it the Fram-King-Fulda. When that factory burned down, the assets were purchased and production restarted in 1958 or 1959 and it was called the King S-7. It was built until 1962 and 411 were made. It uses a 9.5 horsepower 191cc single-cylinder and should sell for between $35,000-$45,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $47,150.

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1956 B.A.G. Spatz

1956 B.A.G. Spatz

Egon Brütsch built a small two-seat convertible called the 200 or “Spatz.” He allowed prospective licensees to drive it and one, Harald Friedrich, liked it but realized Brütsch’s car was essentially crap. He hired an engineer to fix the issues with it and then put it into production under the name of a new company he formed, Bayerische Autowerke GmbH – or B.A.G. It was powered by the ubiquitous 9.5 horsepower 191cc single-cylinder Sachs motor that really got around in those days. Brütsch was not amused and threatened to take Friedrich to court (he eventually took the next group of people to court, and lost because the design was significantly improved over his original and therefore not an infringement) and Friedrich left the company – but not before 859 could be built and sold. This one should sell for between $30,000-$40,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $32,200.

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1957 Voisin Biscooter C31

1957 Voisin Biscooter C31

Gabriel Voisin’s post-war fortunes were not quite as bright as those leading up to war. He designed the tiny Biscooter but, because he no longer controlled his own company, could not get it into production. In fact, no one wanted it – even though he racked up close to 1,000 orders for it. He sold the rights to the Spanish and moved on – sort of. At some point, he went back and designed another Biscooter, an enhanced version – the C31. Some things were different, but it was largely the same. The Spanish were not interested in this model (the one you see here). It uses a 197cc single-cylinder engine making nine horsepower. Still, 16 were built and this one should bring $60,000-$80,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $80,500.

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1961 Taylor-Dunn Model R Trident

1961 Taylor-Dunn Trident

If you weren’t aware, California was a weird place in the 1960s. Still is, really. But this was their idea of a car. Originally introduced as a glorified grocery kart in 1955, the three-wheeled electric runabout was called the Taylor-Dunn PG. In 1959, the Trident was introduced. It still used a one horsepower electric motor – but it also had road-going capability. In today’s world of SUVs, you would need a death-wish to drive this down the street in suburban L.A. But 1961 was a different time – and you could always just hop up onto the sidewalk to get away from traffic – no one would be able to tell where you belonged anyway. This should sell for between $15,000-$20,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $29,900.

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1947 Rovin D2

1947 Rovin D2

Hard work pays off – the brothers Rovin showed their first cyclecar in 1927 and when France was occupied during the war, the continued to work and design on a new car, knowing that the war and its restrictions would eventually end. They had a prototype done in 1945 and were ready to go once France began to get back on its feet. The production version was called the D2 and it uses a 10 horsepower 425cc two-cylinder engine. Their products were quality and they were able to stick around for a while – until about 1959, producing different models. The D2 was short-lived and only 200 were made. This one should bring between $30,000-$40,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $43,700

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1953 Manocar Prototype

1953 Manocar Prototype

This rough-looking tiny car was one of two prototypes built by Établissements Manom in Saint Ouen, France between 1952 and 1953. It uses a four horsepower 125cc single-cylinder and was supposed to set the microcar world on fire due to its ease of access and “roomy” interior. Needless to say, this was as far as the project got. It’s all-original and should sell for between $5,000-$10,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $6,900.

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1963 Goggomobil TL-250 Transporter

1963 Goggomobil T-250 Transporter

We’ve already featured the even-rarer pickup variant of the Goggomobil Transporter. This is the van version. It’s also a TL-250 model, which means it uses the smaller 245cc two-cylinder engine making 14 horsepower. These vans actually had a useful load-carrying capacity for their size and the German postal service used them – in fact, they were more or less responsible for their production, buying up about 2/3 of all vans built. This one (of 3,665 built) has been painted up in Double Bubble Gum colors. All of the Goggomobil Transporters in this sale have some “cute” paint scheme. The price isn’t as cute: $80,000-$100,000. click here for more info.

Update: Sold $132,250.

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1953 Bond Minicar Mk C

1953 Bond Minicar Mk C

Only the Mark F version of the Bond Minicar outsold the Mark C – and it was by less than 100 units. In total, 6,399 Mark Cs were built between 1952 and 1956. The Mark C was a marked improvement in design and quality over the earlier Mark Bs – it looked more like a car from the front – and less like a rolling coffin. The style really fit in with the times. It used a 197cc single-cylinder making nine horsepower. There were various trim levels available – which also helped make this seem more like a real car. This one should bring between $10,000-$15,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $13,800.

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1958 Solyto

1958 Solyto

New-Map, the motorcycle manufacturer (who also built a few cars called the “Baby”), shifted focus to small three-wheeled commercial delivery vehicles in the late-1950s. They were sold under the “Solyto” name. What separated them from their competitors is the two-seat closed cab design that gives it a more car-like appearance than the obviously-scooter-based Vespa delivery trucks and the like. This one uses a 125cc single-cylinder making 4.5 horsepower. These were also sold under license in Spain as the Delfín. This one should sell for between $15,000-$20,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $25,300.

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1962 Motobécane KM 2U

1962 Motobécane

Another mini commercial vehicle to round out our second-to-last edition of Microcar Mondays. This has everything a big truck would have – except smaller – even a spare tire underneath. Motobécane was a major motorcycle and bicycle manufacturer in France from 1923 until 1981. In 1962, they introduced a small car prototype called the KM 2 that never made it to production. There was also a utility version produced (KM 2U) – a lone prototype example. It is believed that this is that truck. It uses a 125cc single-cylinder engine making six horsepower. This unrestored mini-truck should sell for between $5,000-$10,000. Click here for more info. And click here to check out more microcars.

Update: Sold $16,100.

Bond Minicar Mk D

1957 Bond Minicar Mk D

Offered by RM Auctions | Madison, Georgia | February 15-16, 2013

1957 Bond Minicar Mk D

Photo – RM Auctions

The Mark D Bond Minicar was produced from 1956 through 1958. In total, 3,761 were made. They used a 197cc single-cylinder from Villiers making nine horsepower. A number of different models within the Mark D range were available featuring a small range of seating configurations and trim. This one should sell for between $10,000-$15,000. Read more here. And check out more little cars here.

Update: Sold $11,500.

Microcar Mondays Part VI

The Bruce Weiner Microcar Collection

Offered by RM Auctions | Madison, Georgia | February 15-16, 2013

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1957 Biscuter 200-F Pegasin

1957 Biscuter 200-F Pegasin

Gabriel Voisin built some amazing cars in pre-war France. But after the war, the world wasn’t exactly as glitzy as it was prior to it, so he went for something different and designed a tiny microcar called the Biscooter. No one wanted it in France so he licensed it to Spanish manufacturer Autonacional S.A. The body is plastic and the engine is a 197cc single-cylinder making nine horsepower. The Pegasin model seen here was so named because the styling evoked that of the Spanish Pegaso sports car. About 20,000 Spanish Biscuters were built. This one should sell for between $35,000-$45,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $31,625.

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1959 F.G.L.

1959 F.G.L.This tiny Spanish convertible was built by Francisco Gomez Lopez and it was the only one he built. The design is solid and the car is well built – Lopez was a certified engineer who ran a repair shop. It uses a 197cc single-cylinder making 8.5 horsepower. The rest of the car is sourced from other cars of the time. It seems as if he was uninterested in further production, as this was the lone example built. It was restored in 2001 and should sell for between $20,000-$25,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $32,200.

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1961 Isetta 300 Pickup

1961 Isetta 300 Pickup

The Isetta was licensed all over the place in the 1950s and 1960s. In 1957, the license made its way to the U.K.: Isetta of Great Britain Ltd licensed the car from BMW. These cars wear BMW badges, but were sold simply as “Isetta”s. Production lasted through 1962 but the four-wheeled versions were not popular because three-wheelers avoided automobile taxes, as they were classified as motorcycles. This one is the only factory pickup built by Isetta of Great Britain. It has a 13 horsepower 295cc single-cylinder and should bring between $35,000-$45,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $63,250.

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1955 Kroboth Allwetter-Roller

1955 Kroboth Allwetter-Roller

After the Second World War, Gustav Kroboth relocated to Germany to build scooters. But when the rainy season arrived in 1953, it never left. This left a big hole in the scooter industry and Kroboth turned to three-wheelers to fill the void. The Allwetter-Roller (“All Weather Scooter) had a convertible top to provide an, albeit weak, defense against the rain. Production began in 1954 and ended a year later. In total, 55 were built and they used a 175cc single-cylinder engine making nine horsepower. This one should bring between $40,000-$50,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $80,500.

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1935 Velocar Camionette Motoriseé

1935 Velocar Camionette Motorisee

The Mochet name has long been associated with cyclecars and microcars. Georges Mochet built cars under the Mochet name in the 1940s and 1950s. But before him, his father, Charles Mochet, built cyclecars in the 1930s up to the outbreak of war. He only built about 6,000 Velocars and bicycles in total. This Camionette model has such extravagances as a floor. How luxurious! The engine was added (yes, this was a four-wheeled bicycle at some point. Cyclecars weren’t always cars) at some point and is a meager 30cc two-cylinder (!) making 1.8 horsepower. The body is “moleskin” (leather). This is one strange car and you’ll be the only person you know who has one. It should sell for between $25,000-$35,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $14,950.

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1956 NWF 200

1954 NWF 200

Fuldamobil had a brand new design in 1953 called the S-1 and they contracted a company called VGM to build the rounded aluminium bodies. It cost more than Fuldamobil was willing to pay and they ended the deal after only three cars were built. VGM contacted NWF, a coachbuilder also in Germany (they built bus bodies) and NWF decided to put it into production. It was identical to the Fuldamobil, but with a different engine – this one being a 197cc single-cylinder making 9.5 horsepower. Only 701 were built and quite a number of those were sold back to Fuldamobil to cover licensing costs. This one is all original and needs some work, but is still expected to fetch between $15,000-$20,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $16,100.

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1958 Rollera

1958 Rollera

This is a French-built licensed version of the Brütsch Mopetta. It’s slightly larger than the Mopetta, but it’s still quite tiny. It uses a 98cc single-cylinder making 5.2 horsepower (how accurate these decimals are getting!). It was built by Société Rollera Francaise and it is unknown how many were built but there are at least three survivors. It should sell for between $40,000-$50,000. You can read more about it here.

Update: Sold $63,250.

 

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1958 Lloyd LP 600 Alexander

1958 Lloyd LP 600 Alexander

There is a guy who lives around here who owns a Lloyd LT 600 Minibus and there is a sticker on a back window that reads, in German, “He who is not afraid of death drives a Lloyd.” These cars were small, but they aren’t as micro as something like… well, anything above. You could actually drive a Lloyd and not fear as much about dying as you would in a Rollera. There was even power to be had – 19 horses to be exact, pumping furiously out of the 596cc Borgward twin. The Lloyd 600 was introduced in 1955 but production stopped in 1957 because the cars were too basic. A revamped model appeared in 1958 with the “Alexander” tag attached – it was nice enough to come with a headliner, windows and a trunk lid! This car is a survivor among the 176,516 built. It should sell for between $15,000-$20,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $13,800.

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1965 King Midget Series III

1965 King Midget Series III

The Series II King Midget was the final series of King Midgets. It was introduced in 1957 and lasted until production stopped in 1970. King Midgets were offered fully assembled or as a kit (there’s actually a green one just like this on Craigslist on the other side of town for less than half of the estimate on this car. I really should go buy it). The estimate is $10,000-$15,000. The engine is a 9.5 horsepower 380cc single-cylinder. Of the Series III, 3,400 were built in (or sold as kits from) the Athens, Ohio, factory. I had to describe what one of these looked like the other day and the best I could come up with was “mini Willys Jeepster.” Read more here.

Update: Sold $9,200.

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1957 Bond Minicar Mk D

1957 Bond Minicar Mk D

The Mark D Bond Minicar was produced from 1956 through 1958. In total, 3,761 were made. They used a 197cc single-cylinder from Villiers making nine horsepower. A number of different models within the Mark D range were available featuring a small range of seating configurations and trim. This one should sell for between $10,000-$15,000. Read more here. And check out more little cars here.

Update: Sold $11,500.

Microcar Mondays Pt V

The Bruce Weiner Microcar Collection

Offered by RM Auctions | Madison, Georgia | February 15-16, 2013

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1953 Ardex

1953 Ardex

Ardex was originally founded in France in 1934 but by the time war broke out in 1939, production stopped. But in 1952, it sprang back up out of nowhere, producing two (as seen here) or four seat microcars using single-cylinder engines of 100cc or 125cc. Production lasted until 1955 and only a few were built. This one should sell for between $15,000-$25,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $13,800.

 

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1953 Messerschmitt KR 175

Messerschmitt KR 175

We already featured a Messerschmitt KR 200, which was the successor to this car, the original Kabinenroller, the KR 175. Introduced for 1953, the Fend Flitzer offshoot used a rear-mounted 174cc single-cylinder making nine horsepower. Top speed was 50 mph and the bubble canopy was used instead of a door. As production only lasted through 1955, total output was much smaller than the KR 200, with about 15,000 KR 175s built. They cost 2,100 DM back in 1953 but today should sell for $35,000-$45,000 USD. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $23,000.

 

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1956 Paul Vallée Chantecler

1956 Paul Vallée Chantecler

SICRAF (Société Industrielle de Construction et de Racherches Automobiles de France) – yeah, that’s one hell of an acronym – produced scooters in Aubervillers, France, from 1947 through 1953. In 1955, Paul Vallée, the head of SICRAF, introduced a three-wheeled micro-bubble of a car using a frame from one of his scooters as a base. Engines were either 125cc or 175cc. Not many were made. This one should sell for between $45,000-$55,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $98,900.

 

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1950 Rolux Baby

1950 Rolux Baby

The Rolux Baby was identical to the New-Map Baby. New-Map reintroduced their pre-war “Baby” design in 1946 but the following year the company relocated and was renamed Société Rolux. The model remained unchanged from the pre-war design. It uses a rear-mounted 125cc single-cylinder engine. Rolux lasted until 1952 and about 300 cars were made. Three of them are offered in this sale. This is the nicest one and it should bring between $35,000-$45,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $48,875.

 

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1959 Nobel 200

1959 Nobel 200

The Nobel 200 was a licensed copy of the Fuldamobil. While the Fuldamobil was built in Germany, the Nobel was built in the U.K. – Northern Ireland to be exact. They were available from 1958 to 1962 and it uses a 191cc single-cylinder making 10 horsepower (the same one used the Messerschmitt KR 200). It could do 55 mph. This one is obviously in need of a restoration – but it is in better condition than the other Nobel 200 offered in this sale. This one is estimated to bring somewhere between $10,000-$15,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $10,350.

 

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1955 Inter 175A Berline

1955 Inter 175A Berline

The Inter was built by S.N.C.A.N. of Lyons, France from 1953 to 1956. As its name suggests, it uses a 175cc engine. Only about 300 were built. What I like about it is the boat-ness of it. It has that one headlight poking out the front and that lone windshield wiper that comes down from the roof of the car. That and how the body is narrow with a chrome belt line (or water line) and the wheels are located outboard – it kind of looks like the Reyonnah we featured a few weeks ago. It should sell for between $40,000-$50,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $161,000.

 

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1953 Champion 400H

1953 Champion 400H

If this looks like the Maico MC 400 we featured a month or two ago, that’s because it is pretty much the same car. Champion Automobil presented the 400 in 1951. It was a two-door saloon with a folding canvas roof – not a complete convertible, but more like a giant cloth sunroof. In 1953, the 400 became the 400H. The engine was a two-cylinder of about 400cc making 16 horsepower, an increase of two horses over the 400. Only 1,941 were built in 1953 before the company collapsed and was purchased by Maico. This one should sell for between $40,000-$50,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $57,500.

 

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1958 Brütsch Mopetta

1958 Brütsch Mopetta

Egon Brütsch founded the company that bore his name in 1950. By 1958, he had designed and produced 11 different models of microcars, perhaps none more “micro” than this Mopetta. It rocks a single seat and a 50cc engine but it’s actually (a little) bigger than it looks. While I don’t think I’d fit comfortably in this thing, I might be able to actually squeeze into it. Its only about five feet long, so maybe I couldn’t. Maybe Germans in 1958 were just tiny. Only 14 were built. This one should bring $25,000-$35,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $66,125.

 

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1950 Bond Minicar Mk A

1950 Bond Minicar Mk A

The Bond Minicar (retroactively given the “Mk A” identifier) was introduced in 1949 and was sold through 1951. The body, as you can see in this unpainted example, is aluminium and the whole car weighed in at 308 pounds. This non-Deluxe model uses a 122cc single-cylinder making five horsepower. In total, 1,973 were made and it was deemed successful enough to spawn six successors with a total combined production of over 20,000 cars. This was the one that started it all for Bond. It should sell for between $10,000-$15,000, much more than the about £260 it originally cost. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $10,350.

 

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1953 BMA Hazelcar

1953 BMA Hazelcar

The BMA Hazelcar was constructed by the Battery Manufacturing Association, a company located in Hove, England. They introduced the Hazelcar in 1952 and made them into 1954. It’s an electric car, powered by a 1.5 horsepower electric engine. It has a range of 60 miles and a top speed of 20 mph. The price was rather steep for 1953, at £535 and only about 25 were built. This one should go for between $5,000-$10,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $9,200.