Bristol 411 Series III

1972 Bristol 411 Series III Coupe

Offered by Historics at Brooklands | July 13, 2019

Photo – Historics at Brooklands

The Bristol 411 was produced in five different series between 1969 and 1976. Series III cars went on sale in 1972 and were succeeded in 1974 by the Series IV. The main difference from the Series II was some revised styling, including a shift to four headlights and that kind of cool front grille treatment.

The 6.3-liter Chrysler V8 also received a lower compression ratio for 1972. Series II features, including a self-leveling suspension, were retained. Still though, after seven years and five different iterations, Bristol only made 287 examples of the 411.

This one was restored in 2012 and purchased by the consignor in 2017. It should sell for between $45,000-$54,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $49,708.

Beauford Series III

1999 Beauford Series III

Offered by H&H Classics | Buxton, U.K. | July 19, 2018

Photo – H&H Classics

Neoclassics were a type of car that first became very popular in the 1970s. But the Beauford is proof that it’s still a viable concept 40 years later. They got their start in Lancashire in the mid-1980s selling Mini-based kits.

Beaufords are designed to look like large 1930s touring cars. And that’s kind of why, especially in the U.K., they’re still around. The “wedding car” industry is sort of unique to Britain where couples want to be toted around in a grand old car on their big day. And this is the perfect car for that. In fact, it’s sort of designed around being able to do that.

The running gear is centered around a 2.0-liter Ford straight-four and a 4-speed manual transmission. The interior is modern with an old-time setup. It’s got the fiberglass body that takes you back in time, but it’s likely much more reliable than a 60 year old Jag. There is an active owners club and you can always make money on the side with it. The price should be in the $18,000-$22,000 range. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Tipo Bocca Astura

1936 Lancia Astura Series III Tipo Bocca Cabriolet by Pinin Farina

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Amelia Island, Florida | March 10, 2017

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Astura was Lancia’s large car, built between 1931 and 1939. While production overlapped with the Dilambda that the Astura was to replace, it was Lancia’s flagship car and the competitor to the big Alfa Romeos, Delehayes (and the like) of the era. Built in three series, this Series III car is one of 1,243 examples built between 1933 and 1937. It was the most popular series.

The Series III was powered by an 82 horsepower 3.0-liter V-8. While power seems a little light (it was), the car was relatively light as well, with Lancia suggesting that external coachbuilders keep the coachwork to a specific weight. Coachbuilt Asturas are pretty cars, this one being no exception. Pinin Farina’s sleek design was every bit as stylish as the cars coming out of France in the mid-1930s. Also, it has a power top. How many cars from 1936 can say that?

This is one of 328 short wheelbase Series III Asturas built. It is also one of six “Tipo Bocca” (as Pinin Farina called them) Cabriolets built for one specific Lancia dealer in Italy (these six were split between short and long wheelbase chassis). The car made its way to America in 1947 and the current owner acquired it in 2011. It was exquisitely restored thereafter and won awards at both Amelia Island and Villa d’Este. And rightfully so – it’s gorgeous. Price when new? A not insignificant $4,200. Price today? An even less insignificant $2,000,000-$2,600,000. Click here for more info and here fore more from this sale.

Update: Sold $2,145,000.

Diamante-bodied Alfa 6C

1942 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 Series III Sport by Diamante

Offered by Bonhams | Francorchamps, Belgium | May 25, 2013

1942 Alfa Romeo 6C 2500 Series III Sport by Diamante

The Alfa Romeo 6C line entered production in 1925 but the 2500 model you see here didn’t come along until the end of 1938. Production ramped up in the face of war, which would seize Europe and disrupt automotive production and design – setting both back by nearly a decade.

But this car is tastefully appointed and used Alfa’s race-bred 2.5-liter straight-six. It wasn’t some last-minute car cobbled together in a warehouse. These were wonderful, well-engineered cars. Power output was 95 horsepower in the Sport model. The cars were bodied by many famed design houses and sold to royalty the world over. Alfa managed to build a few hundred of these before war broke out, with production continuing afterward and ending in 1952.

This chassis originally sported a cabriolet body by Touring but when it was rediscovered in 1998 the body had already been replaced by this sporty roadster body by Diamante (a coachbuilder I know almost nothing about). It was acquired by the most recent owner in 2008 who had it restored further than what was carried out ten years prior. It has competed in a number of historic events and is eligible for even more. It should sell for between $490,000-$690,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Did not sell.

Microcar Mondays Part VI

The Bruce Weiner Microcar Collection

Offered by RM Auctions | Madison, Georgia | February 15-16, 2013

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1957 Biscuter 200-F Pegasin

1957 Biscuter 200-F Pegasin

Gabriel Voisin built some amazing cars in pre-war France. But after the war, the world wasn’t exactly as glitzy as it was prior to it, so he went for something different and designed a tiny microcar called the Biscooter. No one wanted it in France so he licensed it to Spanish manufacturer Autonacional S.A. The body is plastic and the engine is a 197cc single-cylinder making nine horsepower. The Pegasin model seen here was so named because the styling evoked that of the Spanish Pegaso sports car. About 20,000 Spanish Biscuters were built. This one should sell for between $35,000-$45,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $31,625.

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1959 F.G.L.

1959 F.G.L.This tiny Spanish convertible was built by Francisco Gomez Lopez and it was the only one he built. The design is solid and the car is well built – Lopez was a certified engineer who ran a repair shop. It uses a 197cc single-cylinder making 8.5 horsepower. The rest of the car is sourced from other cars of the time. It seems as if he was uninterested in further production, as this was the lone example built. It was restored in 2001 and should sell for between $20,000-$25,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $32,200.

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1961 Isetta 300 Pickup

1961 Isetta 300 Pickup

The Isetta was licensed all over the place in the 1950s and 1960s. In 1957, the license made its way to the U.K.: Isetta of Great Britain Ltd licensed the car from BMW. These cars wear BMW badges, but were sold simply as “Isetta”s. Production lasted through 1962 but the four-wheeled versions were not popular because three-wheelers avoided automobile taxes, as they were classified as motorcycles. This one is the only factory pickup built by Isetta of Great Britain. It has a 13 horsepower 295cc single-cylinder and should bring between $35,000-$45,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $63,250.

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1955 Kroboth Allwetter-Roller

1955 Kroboth Allwetter-Roller

After the Second World War, Gustav Kroboth relocated to Germany to build scooters. But when the rainy season arrived in 1953, it never left. This left a big hole in the scooter industry and Kroboth turned to three-wheelers to fill the void. The Allwetter-Roller (“All Weather Scooter) had a convertible top to provide an, albeit weak, defense against the rain. Production began in 1954 and ended a year later. In total, 55 were built and they used a 175cc single-cylinder engine making nine horsepower. This one should bring between $40,000-$50,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $80,500.

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1935 Velocar Camionette Motoriseé

1935 Velocar Camionette Motorisee

The Mochet name has long been associated with cyclecars and microcars. Georges Mochet built cars under the Mochet name in the 1940s and 1950s. But before him, his father, Charles Mochet, built cyclecars in the 1930s up to the outbreak of war. He only built about 6,000 Velocars and bicycles in total. This Camionette model has such extravagances as a floor. How luxurious! The engine was added (yes, this was a four-wheeled bicycle at some point. Cyclecars weren’t always cars) at some point and is a meager 30cc two-cylinder (!) making 1.8 horsepower. The body is “moleskin” (leather). This is one strange car and you’ll be the only person you know who has one. It should sell for between $25,000-$35,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $14,950.

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1956 NWF 200

1954 NWF 200

Fuldamobil had a brand new design in 1953 called the S-1 and they contracted a company called VGM to build the rounded aluminium bodies. It cost more than Fuldamobil was willing to pay and they ended the deal after only three cars were built. VGM contacted NWF, a coachbuilder also in Germany (they built bus bodies) and NWF decided to put it into production. It was identical to the Fuldamobil, but with a different engine – this one being a 197cc single-cylinder making 9.5 horsepower. Only 701 were built and quite a number of those were sold back to Fuldamobil to cover licensing costs. This one is all original and needs some work, but is still expected to fetch between $15,000-$20,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $16,100.

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1958 Rollera

1958 Rollera

This is a French-built licensed version of the Brütsch Mopetta. It’s slightly larger than the Mopetta, but it’s still quite tiny. It uses a 98cc single-cylinder making 5.2 horsepower (how accurate these decimals are getting!). It was built by Société Rollera Francaise and it is unknown how many were built but there are at least three survivors. It should sell for between $40,000-$50,000. You can read more about it here.

Update: Sold $63,250.

 

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1958 Lloyd LP 600 Alexander

1958 Lloyd LP 600 Alexander

There is a guy who lives around here who owns a Lloyd LT 600 Minibus and there is a sticker on a back window that reads, in German, “He who is not afraid of death drives a Lloyd.” These cars were small, but they aren’t as micro as something like… well, anything above. You could actually drive a Lloyd and not fear as much about dying as you would in a Rollera. There was even power to be had – 19 horses to be exact, pumping furiously out of the 596cc Borgward twin. The Lloyd 600 was introduced in 1955 but production stopped in 1957 because the cars were too basic. A revamped model appeared in 1958 with the “Alexander” tag attached – it was nice enough to come with a headliner, windows and a trunk lid! This car is a survivor among the 176,516 built. It should sell for between $15,000-$20,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $13,800.

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1965 King Midget Series III

1965 King Midget Series III

The Series II King Midget was the final series of King Midgets. It was introduced in 1957 and lasted until production stopped in 1970. King Midgets were offered fully assembled or as a kit (there’s actually a green one just like this on Craigslist on the other side of town for less than half of the estimate on this car. I really should go buy it). The estimate is $10,000-$15,000. The engine is a 9.5 horsepower 380cc single-cylinder. Of the Series III, 3,400 were built in (or sold as kits from) the Athens, Ohio, factory. I had to describe what one of these looked like the other day and the best I could come up with was “mini Willys Jeepster.” Read more here.

Update: Sold $9,200.

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1957 Bond Minicar Mk D

1957 Bond Minicar Mk D

The Mark D Bond Minicar was produced from 1956 through 1958. In total, 3,761 were made. They used a 197cc single-cylinder from Villiers making nine horsepower. A number of different models within the Mark D range were available featuring a small range of seating configurations and trim. This one should sell for between $10,000-$15,000. Read more here. And check out more little cars here.

Update: Sold $11,500.

King Midget

1965 King Midget Series III

Offered by RM Auctions | Madison, Georgia | February 15-16, 2013

1965 King Midget Series III

Photo – RM Auctions

The Series II King Midget was the final series of King Midgets. It was introduced in 1957 and lasted until production stopped in 1970. King Midgets were offered fully assembled or as a kit (there’s actually a green one just like this on Craigslist on the other side of town for less than half of the estimate on this car. I really should go buy it). The estimate is $10,000-$15,000. The engine is a 9.5 horsepower 380cc single-cylinder. Of the Series III, 3,400 were built in (or sold as kits from) the Athens, Ohio, factory. I had to describe what one of these looked like the other day and the best I could come up with was “mini Willys Jeepster.” Read more here.

Update: Sold $9,200.