Countach Periscopio

1975 Lamborghini Countach LP400

Offered by Artcurial | Le Mans, France | July 7, 2018

Photo – Artcurial

The Countach was the second, what we’ll call, “Mega-Lamborghini.” Originally there was the Miura, the first mid-engined supercar. There were other V-8 and V-12-powered cars in between but they weren’t outrageous. And if there’s one thing that Lamborghini does well, it’s being outrageous.

Originally penned by Marcello Gandini at Bertone, the Countach went on sale in 1974. The LP400 (LP, for the longitudinal mounting of the engine) was powered by a 375 horsepower, 3.9-liter V-12. Top speed was 167 mph. The LP400 was the first model and there would be a few others, as production rambled on through 1990. Lamborghini as a corporate entity changed hands a few times during the Countach’s production run so it was a car made with many “cooks in the kitchen,” if you will.

The other thing that changed between 1974 and 1990 was the preferred styling by customers. The Countach was sort of the torch-bearer for this as they got boxier and boxier with time. But this cool, sleek, original design is really the best-looking of the bunch.

This example was purchased new by a Saudi Prince and by the 1990s it made its way to Italy. An extensive restoration by the third owner followed, with a repaint in the original Giallo Fly. It’s traveled less than 6,000 km since the end of the restoration. Lambo only built 158 examples of the LP400, making it the second rarest variant of the Countach (after the LP400 S). It should sell for between $1,050,000-$1,160,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Artucurial.

Update: Sold $1,141,049.

Lambo 400 GT 2+2

1966 Lamborghini 400 GT 2+2

Offered by Artcurial | Le Mans, France | July 7, 2018

Photo – Artcurial

The first Lamborghini road car was the 350 GT grant tourer. Ferruccio’s followup was the improved 400 GT. The first 400 GTs were just 350 GTs with a bigger engine. Introduced later in 1966, the 400 GT 2+2 featured slight styling changes (thanks to Carrozzeria Touring) as well as the bigger engine.

That bigger engine is a 4.0-liter V-12 making 320 horsepower. This is also a true 2+2 with two seats in the back. Part of the aforementioned styling tweaks include a longer roofline that increased greenhouse space within the car, allowing for a human to sit in the back. This car also featured a Lamborghini-designed transmission.

Built only between 1966 and 1968, the 400 GT was still constructed in very limited numbers. Only 248 were built, with just 224 of those being the restyled 2+2 model. Wearing silver paint when sold new in Switzerland, this car is thought to still sport its original interior (even though its exterior has been repainted). It should sell for between $400,000-$525,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $500,948.

Miura P400

1967 Lamborghini Miura P400

Offered by Coys | Monaco | May 11, 2018

Photo – Coys

The Lamborghini Miura is largely considered to be the first supercar. And rightfully so as it checks most of the supercar boxes: outlandish, racy looks (check!); unreal speed (it was the world’s fastest car upon introduction… so… check!); a mid-engined layout with a V-12 (check!) and a very exotic name (check!).

Miuras were built between 1966 and 1973 and the first model offered was the P400. Produced between 1966 and 1969, when it was replaced by the P400 S, the base P400 is powered by a 4.0-liter V-12 producing 350 horsepower. These cars were capable of about 170 mph, making them quicker than anything else on the road at the time.

This example, one of just 275 produced, was sold new to a rich Texan via Lambo’s London dealership. He kept the car until 1987 when he donated it to a museum in San Antonio. From there, it was purchased by a German owner in 1994. Another German had it until it was purchased by its current owner in 1999. A rare, well-maintained survivor, this 26,000 mile car will likely break the bank if it finds a new owner this weekend in Monaco. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

November/December 2017 Auction Highlights

We’re winding up 2017 and we’re starting with Historics at Brooklands at Mercedes-Benz World. Two cars here shared the “top sale” honors. They were this 1972 BMW 3.0 CSL:

Photo – Historics at Brooklands

And this 1994 Lamborghini Diablo VT. Both brought $182,216.

Photo – Historics at Brooklands

The Peugeot van we featured failed to sell, but the Ligier microcar went for just $2,987 -a steal for a true oddity. Click here for complete results.

Brightwells sort of snuck a sale in under our radar in late November and we didn’t get to feature anything from it. The top sale was $89,965 for this 1963 Jaguar E-Type Series I 3.8 Roadster. Click here for more results.

Photo – Brightwells

Next up, Bonhams’ first of two December sales held in London. This, the Bond Street Sale, appropriately saw this very Bond-esque ex-Paul McCartney 1964 Aston Martin DB5 bring the most money of any car in the sale: $1,811,994.

Photo – Bonhams

That means that the Ferrari 288 GTO (and the Bristol 411) failed to sell. Click here for more from this sale.

RM Sotheby’s held their “Icons” sale in New York City and this 1959 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider Competizione blew everything else away, selling for $17,990,000.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The three cars we featured from this sale all sold, with the Pagani bringing the most at $1,850,000. The Marmon sold for $962,000 and the Chrysler Special $885,000. Click here for the rest of the big dollar cars (and they were all big dollar cars).

Finally, for 2017, Leclere auctioned off some of Citroen’s private reserve. The top sale was the Tubyk Concept we featured for $43,747. The 1980 Xenia Concept missed its estimate, bringing just $8,616. Most Interesting goes to this semi-bizarre 2007 Citroen Jumpy “Snow Atlantic” by Sbarro which sold for $21,210.

Photo – Leclere

The other Sbarro creation was the topless Berlingo and it sold for $12,593. The two Eco 2000 prototypes both sold with the 1983 version bringing $11,268, while the 1984  version brought $19,222. And the Citela Concept sold for $17,233. Click here for complete results.

June 2017 Auction Highlights, Pt. III

First up in the third auction rundown for June’s sales is Brightwells’ Bicester Classic & Vintage sale. The top sale was this 1976 Ferrari 308 GTB that brought $110,000.

Photo – Brightwells

The Delage we featured didn’t meet its reserve but the Willys-Knight we featured a few months ago did, bringing $11,645 this time around. Check out more from Brightwells here.

The first of Bonhams’ two annual Goodwood sales was held at the end of June. Only one of our feature cars failed to sell (the Bugatti Brescia) while a previously-featured, post-war Talbot-Lago did sell: for $176,371. The other Bugatti we featured sold for $365,332. Top sale went to this 1957 Porsche 356A Carrera Speedster for $1,193,852.

Photo – Bonhams

The Hotchkiss sold for $212,710 while the 1911 Mercedes brought $467,080. Click here for more results from this sale.

Artcurial was the auction house that held this year’s Monaco sale, which had a rough sell-through rate, with three of our featured cars failing to meet their reserves: the Arrows F1 car, the Ruf CTR, and the Bentley Arnage wagon. The top sale was this 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR that brought $2,009,990.

Photo – Artcurial

The two cars from this sale that we featured that did sell were the Lombardi and the OSI Cabriolet. They brought $27,247 each. To see what else sold (or didn’t), click here.

Historics at Brooklands had their July sale and the AC Buckland we featured failed to sell. The top seller was this 1989 Lamborghini Countach 25th Anniversary that brought $257,580 – almost three times what these cars were bringing 15 years ago.

Photo – Historics at Brooklands

The three other cars we featured from this sale all sold with the Lotus Cortina bringing the most at $56,976. Next was the Jensen GT for $20,194 and the Lambretta Mink one-off prototype brought up the rear with a sale price of $15,866. Click here for complete results from this sale.

Finally, Mecum’s Denver sale, which was actually held in late July. The AMC Rebel Machine we featured brought $50,000 and the overall top seller was this 2016 Ferrari California T Convertible for $165,000. Everything else from this sale can be found here.

Photo – Mecum

The “Base” Diablo

1991 Lamborghini Diablo

Offered by Auctions America | Ft. Lauderdale, Florida | April 1, 2017

Photo – Auctions America

The Lamborghini Diablo kicked off the craziness that was the supercar world in the 1990s. Introduced in 1990, the car’s development goes back to 1985 when Lambo was under Mimran Brothers ownership. When Chrysler bought the company, they ensured the new car’s success and put it into production.

The original Diablo, of which this is a wonderful example, was rear-wheel drive and powered by a 5.7-liter V-12 making 485 horsepower. Top speed was 202 mph, the first Lamborghini to top 200. The body was designed by Marcello Gandini and it was clearly of a different generation than the lame duck Countach it replaced. This car sports the optional factory rear wing.

The Diablo VT brought four-wheel drive to the Diablo line in 1993 and the original RWD version was discontinued in 1996. In total, 873 were built making it the most popular of all Diablo variants. Recently serviced, this prime example from the dawn of modern supercars should sell for between $155,000-$165,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Lamborghini Jalpa

1988 Lamborghini Jalpa

Offered by Auctions America | Ft. Lauderdale, Florida | April 1, 2017

Photo – Auctions America

Lamborghini went bankrupt in 1978 and was acquired by the Mimran brothers in 1980. They updated the Countach, killed off the Urraco and the Silhouette, and introduced the Jalpa (and later the LM002) before selling the brand to Chrysler in 1988.

The Jalpa was based on the earlier Silhouette and was supposed to be Lambo’s “entry-level” model. It’s powered by a 3.5-liter V-8 making 255 horsepower. It was easier to drive than the full-on exotic Countach and the styling, which is by Bertone, is much more restrained. The V-8 was good for a six second sprint to 60 and top speed was 145 mph. All Jalpas were Targas.

This model was introduced in 1981 and 410 were produced before Chrysler killed it off in 1988. They’re around, but they aren’t plentiful – and they’re very 1980s (in a good way). This one should bring between $85,000-$100,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

November 2016 Auction Highlights, Part II

We’ll start it off with H&H Classics’ Donington Park sale. We didn’t get to feature anything, but this 1973 BMW 3.0 CSi was the top sale at $60,880. Click here for complete results.

Photo - H&H Classics

Photo – H&H Classics

Next up, Mecum in Anaheim, California. The top sale was a car perfectly at home in Los Angeles, a 2015 Porsche 918 Spyder that brought $1,475,000.

Photo - Mecum

Photo – Mecum

The Studebaker Stake Bed pickup truck we featured sold for $14,000. Click here for more results.

Hopping back across the Atlantic, we have Brightwells’ Classic & Vintage Cars sale for November. The top sale was this 2002 Ferrari 360 Modena for $80,836. The Middlebridge Scimitar was featured brought $6,218. All the results can be found here.

Photo - Brightwells

Photo – Brightwells

Another Ferrari top sale was this 1966 Ferrari 275 GTB/6C Alloy for $3,655,120 at RM Sotheby’s Duemila Route sale in Milan, Italy.

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby's

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Porsche 959 sold for $1,078,560 and the Alfa Romeo 6C blew past its estimate selling for $167,776. The Alpine A110 went for $119,840 and the Innocenti Mini $15,579. Go here to see all of the results of this insane sale.

To keep with the Italian exotic theme, Historics at Brooklands had this 1990 Lamborghini Countach 25th Anniversary sell as the top sale for $296,320.

Photo - Historics at Brooklands

Photo – Historics at Brooklands

We featured a number of cars from this sale, including a slew of microcars. The Tourette Supreme was the most expensive at $38,938. The Bamby and the Berkeley were downright cheap, bringing $5,006 and $5,284 respectively. The Zagato Zele fell somewhere in between at $16,687.

There were also some sports cars like the TVR Cerbera which was hammered for $28,508. The oddball Carver sold for $36,852 and, going back in time, one of the first Dellow cars built sold for $20,859. Click here for complete results.

June 2016 Auction Highlights

We move into June, but not before flashing back to April for Coys’ Ascot sale. We didn’t feature anything from this sale, but the top seller was this 1932 Bentley 4-Litre Saloon by Thrupp & Maberly for about $205,000. Click here for full results.

Photo - Coys

Photo – Coys

Next up, Bonhams in Connecticut where a previously featured Templar Touring failed to sell (as did the Frick Special). The top sale was this 2005 Ford GT for $291,500.

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Two of the cars we featured brought an identical amount: $24,200 (the Car-Nation and the K-R-I-T), while the Jowett sold for $34,100. Click here for complete results.

Now on to Russo & Steele’s Newport Beach sale. We didn’t get to feature anything from this sale either, but the top seller was another Ford GT, this time a 2006 for $292,600. Click here for more results.

Photo - Russo & Steele

Photo – Russo & Steele

Onward then, to The Finest and their inaugural sale held in Hershey. Our featured Delage Shooting Brake failed to sell, but this 1968 Lamborghini 400GT 2+2 was the top sale at $577,500. Click here for more results.

Photo - The Finest

Photo – The Finest

And the final auction for this rundown, Mecum’s Portland sale. The top sale here was this 1965 Shelby GT350 that went for $305,000. Our featured Chandler brought a very affordable $13,000. Click here for full results.

Photo - Mecum

Photo – Mecum

May 2016 Auction Highlights, Pt. II

We’re back with more from May, but as has been the case recently, we backtrack, this time to March for results from Coys’ Spring Classics sale in London. A previously-featured Delin Voiturette sold for $93,610. The top sale was this 1984 Lamborghini Countach 5000 S for $368,200.

Photo - Coys

Photo – Coys

The one-off supercar, the Aspira F620, went for $126,110. Complete results can be found here. Moving on, we end up at Bonhams Aston Martin Works sale, where our featured Lagonda wagon failed to sell. What did sell, and for the most money, was this 1963 Aston Martin DB4 Series 5 Vantage Convertible for $1,470,701.

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Our other two feature cars both sold with the V600 Vantage bringing an impressive $654,859 and the Project Vantage Concept Car $127,825. Click here for full results.

Mecum’s annual trek to Indy had a lot of cars cross the block. None were sold for more than this 1967 Shelby Cobra 427 Roadster for $1,100,000.

Photo - Mecum

Photo – Mecum

The Stoddard-Dayton we featured didn’t sell – neither did the Devon GTX or a previously-featured Locomobile. The Corvette Z06 brought $210,000 and the Buick GS Convertible went for $185,000. Click here for more results.

On to Silverstone Auctions’ Classic Race Aarhus Auction where our featured Reo Royale failed to sell. The top sale was this this 2010 Mercedes-Benz 300SLR Recreation that brought about $363,500. Click here for more results.

Photo - Silverstone Auctions

Photo – Silverstone Auctions

And finally (into June), results from Historics at Brooklands’ June sale where this 1991 Ferrari Testarossa was the top sale at $226,140.

Photo - Historics at Brooklands

Photo – Historics at Brooklands

A previously-featured Victor Electric brought $54,145. Our other two feature cars both sold, with the Elva bringing $124,215 and the Lea-Francis $47,775. Click here for further results.