Falcon Competition

1963 Falcon Competition Mk III

Offered by Russo & Steele | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 18-22, 2017

Photo - Russo & Steele

Photo – Russo & Steele

Peter Pellandine’s Falcon Shells (later, Falcon Cars) built kit cars and body shells for cars in England between 1956 and 1964. The first two models they offered were called the Mark 1 and Mark 2. The third car was called the Competition and the fourth car was introduced as the Mark III but sold as the Caribbean. What we have here is a Competition model, sometimes referred to as a Mark III because it was the third model the company built.

This sports racer was originally fitted with running gear from an MG A which has since been swapped out for a Ford Cortina’s 1.3-liter straight-four. The kit cost £560 when new and both a Ford engine and a chassis were included in that price. Or you could just buy the body shell.

This particular example has been active off and on in historic racing since 1994. It’s been recently prepped and is ready to run. It is described as the “last known” Falcon Competition “known to exist.” Either that means it is the only one left or it was the last one built… I’d lean toward the last one left. Either way, you can read more about it here and see more from Russo & Steele here.

Update: Not sold.

Elva Mk III

1959 Elva Mk III

Offered by Historics at Brooklands | June 11, 2016

Photo - Historics at Brooklands

Photo – Historics at Brooklands

Elva was a manufacturer of automobiles – most of which were race cars – founded in 1955 by Frank Nichols in Sussex. There were sports racing cars, single seaters, and even a few road cars sprinkled in for good measure. Production ended in 1968.

The Mk III Elva was an evolution of the Mk II racer (most cars just evolved from earlier ones). This car went to the U.S. when new and is powered by a Coventry Climax 1.5-liter straight-four. The body is all auminium and it has race history going back to 1959 at the hands of Carroll Shelby’s mechanic.

The current owner acquired the car in 2009, bringing it back to the U.K. and restoring it. I don’t have an exact number of how many were built, but based on serial numbers, it is probably between 15-25 examples total. It should sell for between $110,000-$125,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $124,215.

AAR-Toyota Eagle GTP

1992 AAR-Toyota Eagle Mk III GTP

Offered by Gooding & Company | Pebble Beach, California | August 15-17, 2014

Photo - Gooding & Company

Photo – Gooding & Company

We’ve featured some of Dan Gurney’s Eagles – mostly open-wheel cars. Well here is a GTP prototype AAR Eagle. It’s powered by a turbocharged Toyota 2.1-liter straight-four making 700-750 horsepower, depending on configuration. AAR and Toyota teamed up in the 80s for sports car racing and the Eagle Mk III dominated the 1992 IMSA GTP season. Between 1991 and 1993, they won 21 of 27 races. This is chassis #004 and its major wins are:

  • 1992 12 Hours of Sebring – 1st (with Juan Manuel Fangio II and Andy Wallace)
  • 1993 12 Hours of Sebring – 1st (with Fangio II and Wallace)

It also had 12 other victories and has been owned by Fangio II since it stopped racing. It is being offered for sale for the first time and should sell for between $700,000-$1,000,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $1,045,000.

Jensen CV8

1966 Jensen CV8 Mk III

Offered by H&H Auctions | Buxton, U.K. | July 24, 2013

1966 Jensen CV8 Mk III

The Jensen CV8 was a four-seat sports car – or Grand Tourer – introduced in 1962. I’m not 100% sure what the CV8 name stands for, but the car did use a Chrysler V-8 (Chrysler V8 – maybe?). Namely, this car uses a 6.3-liter V-8 (known as a 383 in the States). It makes 330 horsepower – which makes this car pretty powerful if you think about it.

The styling, love it or hate it, has a distinct look with the four headlights that can be viewed as either looking at you or giving you a really weird stare. Even if it’s slightly odd looking, I really like it. And it was one of the fastest GT cars of the period, with a top speed of around 136 mph and a big V8 (most British cars of the era used itty-bitty four-cylinder engines or straight-sixes).

Only 500 CV8s were built in total. This one was in storage from 1988 until last year when it was freshened and put into running condition. It is also one of the last 10 examples of the model built making it a very late car. And it’s rather pleasant looking in California Sage paint. It is expected to sell for between $42,000-$48,500. Click here for more info and here for the rest of H&H’s Pavilion Gardens auction lineup.

Update: Not Sold.