Ford Falcon Clan

1963 Ford Falcon Clan by Ghia

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Online | September 16-25, 2020

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Here is another coachbuilt example of something American you wouldn’t expect to have landed in the hands of an Italian design house. Ford and Ghia have partnered on quite a few show cars over the years, and Ford has actually had a stake in Ghia since 1970. But in the 1950s, Ghia was Chrysler’s turf. That all started to change about the time that this fastback Falcon appeared in 1964.

The car was built on a 1963 Ford Falcon Sprint chassis. It retained the Sprint’s 164-horsepower, 4.3-liter (260ci) V8. Ghia added the fastback body style that RM correctly notes as sort of predicting the upcoming Plymouth Barracuda.

It’s a neat-looking thing, but it somehow makes the relatively ho-hum Falcon appear just as ho-hum, yet even more of the period. I would have totally believed this was a factory body style if I didn’t already know it was a one-off. It’s expected to fetch $40,000-$75,000 (in other words, they have no idea what it’s worth). Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Falcon F7

2012 Falcon F7

Offered by Barrett-Jackson | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 14-22, 2017

Photo - Barrett-Jackson

Photo – Barrett-Jackson

You may have never heard of the Falcon F7 or Holly, Michigan, based Falcon Motorsports, but they’ve done what a lot of start up supercar manufacturers struggle to do: actually build and sell a complete automobile. Founded by Jeff Lemke in 2009, Falcon showed the F7 for the first time at the 2012 Detroit Auto Show. That’s a pretty quick development process. It’s not a kit car either, this is a full on, hand-assembled supercar.

And, like most other start up supercar manufacturers that actually manage to get off the ground, the F7 uses parts and technology that other manufacturers have perfected. For instance, the engine is a 7.0-liter GM motor that has been fitted with a few Lingenfelter performance parts to generate 640 horsepower. That’s good enough for a sprint to 60 in 3.3 seconds and a top speed of about 190 mph.

The body is made of carbon fiber and Kevlar and they are wrapped around an aluminium and carbon fiber chassis. The thing certainly has supercar looks – and supercar rarity. As of 2015, the company has only built nine examples of the F7 (though it looks like they will still build you a new one if you want it). Total production is unlikely to ever surpass 25 units. When new, this car would’ve cost the owner about $250,000. Barrett-Jackson sold the first-ever F7 last year for $198,000. The car you see here is the second F7 built and should bring a similar amount. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $148,500.

Falcon Competition

1963 Falcon Competition Mk III

Offered by Russo & Steele | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 18-22, 2017

Photo - Russo & Steele

Photo – Russo & Steele

Peter Pellandine’s Falcon Shells (later, Falcon Cars) built kit cars and body shells for cars in England between 1956 and 1964. The first two models they offered were called the Mark 1 and Mark 2. The third car was called the Competition and the fourth car was introduced as the Mark III but sold as the Caribbean. What we have here is a Competition model, sometimes referred to as a Mark III because it was the third model the company built.

This sports racer was originally fitted with running gear from an MG A which has since been swapped out for a Ford Cortina’s 1.3-liter straight-four. The kit cost £560 when new and both a Ford engine and a chassis were included in that price. Or you could just buy the body shell.

This particular example has been active off and on in historic racing since 1994. It’s been recently prepped and is ready to run. It is described as the “last known” Falcon Competition “known to exist.” Either that means it is the only one left or it was the last one built… I’d lean toward the last one left. Either way, you can read more about it here and see more from Russo & Steele here.

Update: Not sold.

Falcon Caribbean

1963 Falcon Caribbean

Offered by H&H Auctions | Buxton, U.K. | July 23, 2014

Photo - H&H Auctions

Photo – H&H Auctions

Peter Pellandine was involved in the design and manufacture of three separate automobile marques: Pelland/Pellandine, Ashley, and Falcon. The latter two were British special (or kit car) constructors. Essentially, the company built bodies to replace the less sporty bodies that their customers’ cars originally came with.

Pellandine founded Falcon Shells after he left Ashley Laminates in 1956. The company produced fiberglass cars – seven different models in all. The Caribbean was manufactured in kit (body-only) form between 1959 and 1963 with more than 2,000 sold. They were designed to fit on the pre-war chassis of the British Ford Ten. I’m unsure as to the chassis of this car, but the engine is a 1.3-liter straight-four.

The Caribbean was Falcon’s most popular model and it would be a fun, easy-to-maintain, and cheap-to-buy starter collector car. This one should sell for between $10,300-$13,700. Click here for more info and here for the rest of H&H’s Pavilion Gardens lineup.

Update: Not sold.