Citroen Concept Cars

Citroen Concept Cars

Offered by Leclere | Aulnay sous Bois, France | December 10, 2018


1980 Citroen Xenia Concept

Photo – Leclere

Leclere has been tasked with unloading some extras from Citroen’s private collection. Among the many cars are more than a few concepts, including this 1980 Xenia. First shown at the 1981 Frankfurt Motor Show, this wagonoid design study was what wagons were supposed to look like in the year 2000. Apparently Citroen didn’t see the SUV craze coming.

Presumably unpowered (but hey, it has solar panels to run the air conditioning!), this would make an interesting piece in any collection. It should bring between $17,500-$29,500. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $8,616.


1983 Citroen Eco 2000 SA 109

Photo – Leclere

Warning: this car is MUCH smaller than it appears. It is not mini-van-esque in size as its shape might belie, but (and look at the old cars parked nearby) it’s a miniature version of a compact car. The Eco 2000 program began to see if they could build a car that got great gas mileage and the lowest possible drag coefficient.

That Eco 2000 program lasted from 1981 through 1984 and four prototypes were built. This was the third one and it was built for wind tunnel testing. It should sell for between $3,500-$8,250. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $11,268.


1984 Citroen Eco 2000 SL 10

Photo – Leclere

Here’s another Eco 2000 prototype. This was the final and most sophisticated of the four Eco 2000 cars and it actually looks more like a road car than the wind tunnel model shown above as it was actually shown to the public. It’s a roller, as Citroen is keeping the only example that has an engine.

This car should sell for between $9,500-$14,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $19,222.


1991 Citroen Citela Concept

Photo – Leclere

The Citela was Citroen’s take on the urban EV… back in 1991. This car was first shown at the French Pavilion of the 1992 World Expo in Seville, Spain. It had an electric motor and powers two inboard rear wheels (notice how you can’t seem them from this angle?). It sort of just looks like an over-sized mobility scooter.

The powered version (that Citroen still has) will do 68 mph and makes 26 horsepower. A couple of these prototypes were built in varying body styles and this one is just a roller. It should bring between $11,750-$14,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $17,233.


1999 Citroen Berlingo Flanerie by Sbarro

Photo – Leclere

The Berlingo is a van built sold by Citroen. The first generation was introduced in 1996. Switzerland-based Sbarro got their hands on this one and made it wacky. In all, they did at least three takes on the Berlingo. This one has four rows of seats and looks like an amusement park vehicle, like something that would be used in Jurassic Park.

This is the only one like it and it is currently missing running gear. It shouldn’t be too hard to find a Berlingo power unit and pop it back under hood. This should bring between $10,500-$13,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $12,593.


2010 Citroen Tubyk Concept

Photo – Leclere

No, this is not a panda with wheels. Instead, it is a modern take on Citroen’s TUB light van of 1939-1941. The TUB was the first van ever to feature a sliding side door. This concept van debuted at the 2011 Frankfurt Motor Show. It’s full-on French weird in that they-just-might-build-it kind of way.

This one isn’t powered but it should bring between $23,500-$35,000. Click here for more info and here for the rest of the Citroen’s on offer.

Update: Sold $43,747.

Ligier JS4

1980 Ligier JS4

Offered by Historics at Brooklands | November 25, 2017

Photo – Historics at Brookands

Guy Ligier was a racing driver who got his start in the 1950s after his career as a rugby player ended. From the driver’s seat, Ligier transitioned to Formula One team owner. His Equipe Ligier team made over 300 starts between 1976 and 1996 (it became Prost Grand Prix for 1997). They managed to win a few races in the 70s and 80s.

So I’m sure you’re thinking “This little box on wheels does not look like something that a proper F1 manufacturer should be making.” But Ligier was all over the board. They built mid-engined sports cars and in 1980 they introduced this, the two-seater JS4. It’s powered by a rear-mounted three horsepower 50cc single-cylinder two-stroke engine. Built between 1980 and 1983, the company moved nearly 7,000 of them in 1980 alone.

Equipe Ligier used one as a pit vehicle at F1 races (that car still exists and is currently located at one of America’s greatest car museums in Nashville). Ligier actually still builds and sells microcars… so I guess it turns out this is exactly what kind of road car an F1 team should be making. Who knew? This one is selling at no reserve. You can read more here and see more from this sale here.

Update: Sold $2,987.

Buehrig Carriage-Roof Coupe

1980 Buehrig Carriage-Roof Coupe

Offered by Auctions America | Auburn, Indiana | September 2, 2017

Photo – Auctions America

Gordon Buehrig was one of America’s great automotive designers. He worked for Packard, Stutz, and GM but is mostly remembered as E.L. Cord’s go-to man for some of America’s greatest cars. He designed the Auburn Boattail Speedster and the Cord 810, both for Cord’s little empire. Later successes included the Continental Mk II.

In 1979 – at age 75 – Buehrig was sort of honored by Detroit-area businessman and mega-collector Richard Kughn who decided to go into business with Mr. Buehrig to build this, the Carriage-Roof Coupe. Neo-classics were just becoming really popular and why not have one of the designers of one of the original-classics pen one?

This car is bodied in fiberglass and is powered by a 5.7-liter V-8. The design is decidedly Cord-like, which makes sense given their shared origins. Only three of these were built as the $130,000 price was deemed prohibitive. The first example is now in the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg Museum. Richard Kughn still retains the other two, this being one of them. Interestingly, Auctions America originally had a photo of the other car posted. Apparently Kughn changed his mind and wanted to keep that one because now this is the one in the catalog.

No estimate is available for this car, so we’ll just have to wait and see, but it is the first Buehrig Carriage-Roof Coupe to ever be offered for sale publicly. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $25,850.

Update: Not sold, Mecum Kissimmee 2018, high bid of $35,000.

Ferrari 312 T5

1980 Ferrari 312 T5

Offered by Bonhams | Carmel, California | August 18, 2017

Photo – Bonhams

Bravo on the photo, Bonhams. This shot was clearly captured with a car drifting around Sonoma Raceway in the background. Anyway… Ferrari’s 312T line of Formula One racing cars competed in F1 between 1975 and 1980. This car was the last of the series.

Ferrari’s driver lineup for 1980 was the same as 1979: Gilles Villeneuve and Jody Scheckter. This was Scheckter’s car for much of the 1980 season (even though it has Villeneuve’s name by the driver’s compartment). This car was the fastest of all the 312Ts: it’s powered by a 515 horsepower 3.0-liter V-12. The race history of this car includes:

  • 1980 South African Grand Prix – 21st, DNF (with Scheckter)
  • 1980 U.S. Grand Prix West – 5th (with Scheckter)
  • 1980 Belgian Grand Prix – 8th (with Scheckter)
  • 1980 Monaco Grand Prix – 14th, DNF (with Scheckter)
  • 1980 French Grand Prix – 12th (with Scheckter)
  • 1980 British Grand Prix – 10th (with Scheckter)
  • 1980 German Grand Prix – 13th (with Scheckter)

Defending World Champion Scheckter retired at the end of the 1980 season and when he went, so did this series of Ferrari F1 cars, as they moved forward into the turbo era. Bonhams is not publishing a pre-sale estimate with this car, but the T3 we featured a few years ago sold for $2,310,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

The Speed Camel

1980 Citroen Méhari

Offered by Coys | Essen, Germany | April 9, 2016

Photo - Coys

Photo – Coys

I feel like trying to explain the Citroen Méhari to someone who has never seen one would be a very amusing conversation:

So is it a car or an SUV? Yes. It’s low like a car, but it has stamped lines down the side of it to make it look rugged and to imply off-roadiness.
Does it have four wheel drive? Three years worth of them do. It’s made of plastic.
Well at least it’s light. Is it powerful? No, it has a two-cylinder engine. But it is implied that it is fast because it is named after a fast camel.
That’s weird. Does it look cool? Is it functional? Well, uh, sorta? It only has two seats and a kind of flat space behind them. And it has kind of a tarp for a roof, and windows. So it’s technically a convertible, so that’s cool, right?
I guess. Who made it? The French.
Oh, now I get it. Yep.

The Méhari could have only come from a French factory. Featuring a 602cc flat-twin, the car was introduced in 1968 and stayed in production for the next 20 years. 4WD cars were only built between 1980 and 1983, with about 13,000 of them made. In total, 144,953 Méharis were built.

This one has been well restored and I can’t tell from the information provided whether or not this is a front or four driver. I’d guess the former as the expected price is listed between $16,860-$22,500. Click here for more info and here for more from Coys.

Update: Sold $26,250.

Mustang Enduro Prototype

1980 Ford Mustang GT Enduro Prototype

Offered by Auctions America | Hilton Head, South Carolina | October 31, 2015

Photo - Auctions America

Photo – Auctions America

The third-generation “Fox body” Mustang was built between 1979 and 1993. Ford actually took them racing int the 1980s. In the early 80s, these racing IMSA Mustangs were very boxy and wide. So Ford had three road-going prototypes built in 1982 to “resemble” these boxy racing cars. This is one of them (the other two are red).

The engine is a 5.0-liter V-8 that has been modified to something that more resembles a race engine than the Fox body’s dorky 2.3-liter straight-four base powerplant. Horsepower is generously “more than stock.” Everything else – from the shifter, transmission, drivetrain and suspension – has been customized.

This 14,000-mile car is a very rare prototype and one of the coolest Mustangs built in the 1980s – which, let’s be honest, wasn’t the nameplate’s high point. It should bring between $45,000-$60,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $40,700.

1980 Tyrrell

1980 Tyrrell 010

Offered by RM Auctions | Monaco | May 10, 2014

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

Ken Tyrrell’s Tyrrell Racing was active in Formula One from 1968 through 1998. That’s a pretty solid run, lined with streaks of fame, including the much-loved, six-wheeled P34. This car isn’t quite as exciting.

Candy Team Tyrrell ran cars for Jean-Pierre Jarier and Derek Daly for the complete 1980 season. The 010 debuted at the 1980 South African Grand Prix. This car, chassis 003 was first used by Daly at the 1980 Monaco Grand Prix. The engine is a 475 horsepower 3.0-liter Ford-Cosworth V-8.

This car competed in 17 races over two seasons and was driven by Daly, Jarier, Eddie Cheever, and Michele Alboreto. Its top finish was 5th (four times). It should sell for between $295,000-$390,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $246,597.

Five Classic F1 Racers

Classic F1 Racers

Offered by RM Auctions | Monaco | May 10, 2014

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1974 Hesketh 308

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

The recent film Rush really put the spotlight back on James Hunt – one of F1s legendary personalities. It also shined a light on the Hesketh team – the coolest team in F1 history. The Hesketh 308 was the team’s first car designed in-house. And this is the first (of three) examples built.

If you were to believe the movie, this car was designed in a barn by Harvey Postlewaite (it was actually desienged by Postlewaite, location unconfirmed). The engine is a 3.0-liter Ford-Cosworth V-8 making 485 horsepower. This car was quick from the outset – shocking Hesketh’s rivals. This car was entered in two non-F1 races before the team moved to another car. It was driven in period by James Hunt and Alan Jones. This is an incredible opportunity to acquire a race car from one of the most storied F1 teams in history. It should sell for between $480,000-$890,000. Yes, that’s a big range. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $385,308.

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1980 Tyrrell 010

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

Ken Tyrrell’s Tyrrell Racing was active in Formula One from 1968 through 1998. That’s a pretty solid run, lined with streaks of fame, including the much-loved, six-wheeled P34. This car isn’t quite as exciting.

Candy Team Tyrrell ran cars for Jean-Pierre Jarier and Derek Daly for the complete 1980 season. The 010 debuted at the 1980 South African Grand Prix. This car, chassis 003 was first used by Daly at the 1980 Monaco Grand Prix. The engine is a 475 horsepower 3.0-liter Ford-Cosworth V-8.

This car competed in 17 races over two seasons and was driven by Daly, Jarier, Eddie Cheever, and Michele Alboreto. Its top finish was 5th (four times). It should sell for between $295,000-$390,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $246,597.

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1966 Brabham-Repco BT20

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

Driver Jack Brabham founded the Brabham Racing Organisation with designer Ron Tauranac in 1960. The team was commonly referred to as Brabham throughout its life. 1992 was the final season for the team that started as Brabham and had undergone a few name changes over the years.

Brabham fielded cars for Jack Brabham and Denny Hulme for 1966. The BT20 used a Repco 3.0-liter V-8 making 300 horsepower. Denny Hulme drove this car on his way to winning the 1967 Championship. Hulme won the 1967 Monaco Grand Prix in this very machine. In my opinion, this is the second-coolest car F1 car of this sale, behind the Hesketh – although it is the coolest looking. It should sell for between $795,000-$985,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $1,502,701.

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1989 Ferrari F1-89

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

For 1989, Ferrari’s F1 car was the F1-89 – also known as the Ferrari 640. It was the first Ferrari F1 car for the new, non-turbo era. The engine is a 600 horsepower 3.5-liter V-12. and it was Gerhard Berger’s ride for part of the 1989 season. Unfortunately, F1-89 was plagued with reliability issues and this car DNF’d every race it was in. Which isn’t really a ringing endorsement – but then again, this is a Ferrari Formula One car you can own – and it will cost you between $825,000-$1,250,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $847,678.

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1982 Renault RE30B

Photo - RM Auctions

Photo – RM Auctions

The RE30B was an updated version of – you guessed it – the RE30. The RE30 won three races with Alain Prost in 1981 and the RE30B combined for four wins between Prost and Rene Arnoux in 1982. This was Arnoux’s car for eight races in 1982 – including three pole runs – Monaco, Imola, and Zandvoort. It was a great qualifier but never raced all that well. Its best finish was 10th at the 1982 Detroit Grand Prix. The engine in this car was a 560 horsepower twin-turbocharged 1.5-liter V-6. It is a relative bargain between $175,000-$220,000. Click here for more info and here for more from RM’s Monaco sale.

Update: Sold $315,953.

BMW’s Supercar

1980 BMW M1

Offered by RM Auctions | Fort Worth, Texas | April 27, 2013

1980 BMW M1

The BMW M1 is the most awesome and supercar-y BMW ever built (I guess the 507 would count too, but its sporting intentions don’t quite match those of this car. And it was built in the pre-modern supercar era). It is the only mid-engined BMW built in quantities to this point.

In fact, it is so revered that when BMW’s M-Power in-house tuning division created their version of the 1-Series, BMW forwent their conventional naming system that would have pegged the car as the “M1” and went with the obtuse “1 Series M Coupe” instead. It’s nice to see a company value their legacy so much.

This car is one of 456 hand-built by BMW between 1978 and 1981. There were competition versions and art cars, but the road-going M1 is a thing to behold. It uses a mid-mounted 3.5-liter straight six making 273 horsepower – which doesn’t sound like a lot now, but this was 1980 when big-power engines were being choked out of existence. It could do 160 mph.

The M1 was the first serious performance car built by BMW. It retained halo status for some time and has never really been equaled (the Z8, maybe). They’ve always been valuable and sought after. This one is expected to bring between $150,000-$250,000. Click here for more info and here for more from the Don Davis Collection.

Update: Sold $242,000.

1980 Ferrari Sedan

1980 Ferrari Pinin

Offered by Bonhams | Monaco | May 11, 2012

Ferrari’s new FF two-door shooting brake seemed to rile some purists when first revealed – for why would their beloved car company build a wagon? Well, the same thing happened when Porsche built, first the Cayenne and then the Panamera. Lamborghini has taken the wraps off it’s new SUV concept – as have Bentley and Maserati. But for Ferrari to think beyond two doors, I fear, would be too much for most purists to handle.

Enter Pininfarina, possibly the most famed of all Italian design houses – and the one most closely associated with Ferrari. In 1980, Pininfarina celebrated 50 years of coachbuilding and they did it by building this four-door Ferrari – and Bonhams claims it is the only Ferrari sedan in existence (the Sultan of Brunei has a few Ferrari four-door wagons, but no sedan that anyone is aware of).

The car was introduced at the 1980 Turin Motor Show with a 5.0-liter V12 out of a Berlinetta Boxer. Only in this case, the engine was in the front instead of the rear. The car appeared at a few more auto shows in 1980 and 1981 and then Ferrari removed the mechanicals and the display car was eventually sold to the Belgian Ferrari importer, who showed the car in 2005 for the 75th anniversary of Pininfarina.

The car was sold in 2008 and the new owner commissioned Ferrari to re-install the drivetrain so the car could be driven. Another 360 horsepower 5.0-liter V12 was installed and the car was finally driven in 2010.

If you’ve always dreamed of owning a Ferrari sedan, this is bound to be your only chance. The current owner paid €176,000 for it at an RM Auction in 2008 and then paid God-knows-how-much to get it running. The pre-sale estimate this time around is $660,000-$790,000. For the complete catalog description, click here and for more on Bonhams in Monaco, click here.

Update: did not sell.