Coachbuilt 230SL

1964 Mercedes-Benz 230SL Coupe Speciale by Pininfarina

Offered by Gooding & Company | Pebble Beach, California | August 19-20, 2022

Photo – Gooding & Company

The W113 was Mercedes-Benz‘s first real SL class, in the terms we think of it today. It was the “replacement” for the 300SL and 190SL, and three models were offered between 1963 and 1971. There was the initial 230SL, which was sold from 1963 through 1966. It was replaced by the short-lived 250SL and then by the 280SL.

The 230SL was powered by a fuel-injected 2.3-liter inline-six rated at 148 horsepower. The W113 was sold with a removable hardtop, which earned the cars the nickname “Pagoda.” They all had that removable hardtop. Except this one.

Pininfarina wanted to design a true coupe version of the car, and Mercedes sent them a 230SL to do just that. Tom Tjaarda styled it. The design is interesting… from the fenders on back. The front end is a little droopy. There were 19,831 230SLs built, and only one coupe. The pre-sale estimate is “in excess of $1,000,000.” Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $1,215,000.

Rene Bonnet Djet II

1964 Rene Bonnet Djet II

Offered by Bonhams | London, U.K. | December 4, 2021

Photo – Bonhams

We’ve featured a Djet before, a later Mk V variant. Those were branded as Matras, as Matra had taken over Rene Bonnet Automobiles in October 1964. By that point Matra was producing the bodies and supplying a factory for the production of the cars anyway.

Rene Bonnet was half of Deutsch-Bonnet before venturing out on his own. The first Djet (“jet”) debuted in 1962. The Djet II came later and featured a Gordini-tuned 1.1-liter inline-four that made 85 horsepower. The mid-engined sports car had a top speed of 111 mph.

This example has been with the same owner since 1992. Production figures vary, as Bonhams reports “181” produced, but I think they mean of all Rene Bonnet-branded Djets. Gordini-powered “II” production was likely less than 40. This one should bring between $47,000-$67,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $32,394.

Mercedes O319 Minibus

1964 Mercedes-Benz O319 Minibus

Offered by Brightwells | Online | February 18, 2021

Photo – Brightwells

Mercedes-Benz has been in the commercial vehicle business for a long time. Longer than just about anyone, in fact. The L319 was a “light” commercial platform produced by the company between 1955 and 1968. It was their first such vehicle, slotting in between a small delivery van and a run-of-the-mill truck.

They were available in a variety of body styles, including vans, flatbed trucks, and more. A minibus variant called the O319 was also available. This would’ve originally had a small, 55-horsepower diesel engine in it, but now it has a replacement 2.0-liter diesel inline-four.

This tiny bus has apparently been in a private Welsh collection for years, being primarily used as a wedding party bus (though the interior still has very bus-like rows of seating). It is expected to sell for between $41,000-$48,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Bid to $34,192… Brightwells doesn’t make it easy to tell if a car sold or not. This one missed its estimate so I’m not sure.

Honda S500

1964 Honda S500

Offered by BH Auction | Osaka, Japan | December 20, 2020

Photo – BH Auction

The S500 was just the second production car from Honda. And it spawned a line of sports cars that has, thus far, culminated in the spectacular S2000 (after quite a long gap). Produced only in 1963 and 1964, the S500 would be replaced by the S600 and then the S800.

Only 1,363 examples were produced, all of which were two-door roadsters. Power is from a 531cc inline-four that routes power to the rear wheels via a four-speed manual transmission and chain drive. That’s right, Honda leaned heavily on its motorcycle experience with this car. It’s got Keihin carburetors and a 9,500-rpm redline.

With just 44 horsepower on tap, it wasn’t blindingly fast. But it’s tiny. Like really tiny. And is a complete “momentum car.” And I’m sure it’s a blast. No estimate is available at this time, but you can read more here and see more from this sale here.

Update: Not sold.

Steyr-Fiat

1964 Steyr-Fiat 1100 D

Offered by Dorotheum | Vosendorf, Austria | August 29, 2020

Photo – Dorotheum

This is a shameless weird-marque grab. I love that the alphabetical list on this site is an amazing collection of different marques, and Steyr-Fiat is a rare one. There isn’t much special about this car other than who made it, and the fact that I turned down featuring a 120-year-old Peugeot to squeeze this in makes me a little naseous.

The Fiat 1100 was a small sedan produced between 1953 and 1969 across a few different models. The base 1100 gave way to the 1100 D in 1962. It was powered by a 50 horsepower, 1.2-liter inline-four.

Steyr, of Austria, produced the 1100 under license, along with some other Fiats. In some cases, they fitted their own engines instead of Fiat’s, along with other mechanical modifications. And they were sold as “Steyr-Fiats” for a period of time (with a unique front badge listing both names). This is the type of car you will only ever find in Central Europe. This one should bring between $7,000-$11,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $8,174.

Glas 1300 GT

1964 Glas 1300 GT Coupe

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Essen, Germany | March 26-27, 2020

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Here is another Hans Glas rarity. The 1300 GT debuted at the 1963 Frankfurt Motor Show and was updated to 1700 GT specification in late 1965. Most of the cars were coupes, but a limited number of cabriolets were also produced. BMW bought Glas in 1966, and in 1967, they launched the BMW 1600 GT, a BMW-badged version of this car with a bigger engine.

This 1300 GT is powered by a 1.3-liter inline-four rated at 74 horsepower. That enabled a top speed of 106 mph. Styling was actually by Frua, and only 5,013 coupe examples were built between the 1300 and 1700 models.

Finished in blue over black, this car is sold at no reserve with a spare engine. It’s a rare coupe that will stand out wherever it goes. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $17,892.

Glas S 1004

1964 Glas S 1004 Coupe

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Essen, Germany | March 26-27, 2020

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Hans Glas GmbH was an independent automobile manufacturer based in Dingolfing, Germany. The company was about a century old when it built the Goggomobil before releasing its first Glas-branded car in the late 1950s. The Glas “04” was built between 1962 and 1968, and Glas was purchased by BMW in 1966.

Three different engine levels were offered, with this car carrying the smallest available: a 992cc inline-four making 41 horsepower. The S 104 featured a steel monocoque and was offered as a two-door coupe, cabriolet, and four-door sedan.

This coupe has been restored and is one of 40,703 produced across all engine sizes. It will sell at no reserve. Click here for more info and here for more from RM in Germany.

Update: Sold $13,573.

Panhard 24 Coupe

1964 Panhard 24 Coupe

Offered by Historics Auctioneers | Ascot Racecourse, U.K. | March 7, 2020

Photo – Historics Auctioneers

Panhard et Levassor was one of the world’s earliest major automotive manufacturers. Their contributions to the design of the modern automobile were massive, but by the 1960s, time had taken its toll. Panhard, having dropped “et Levassor,” stopped car production in 1967. They continued to build military vehicles until the brand was merged into Arquus in 2018.

The final Panhard model was the 24. Built between 1964 and 1967, the 24 was offered as a two-door coupe or sedan. This coupe is powered by a front-mounted 848cc flat-twin that made 50 horsepower in its more aggressive form.

This car looks great in two-tone maroon and white. It’s a rare car today, especially in this shape, and it should sell for between $15,000-$19,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold.

Siata 1500 TS

1964 Siata 1500 TS

Offered by Aste Bolaffi | Milan, Italy | May 24, 2019

Photo – Aste Bolaffi

Siata was founded in 1926 and spent their first few decades tuning Fiats. Their first original model debuted in 1948, but it was still Fiat-based. That trend continued into the 1960s, when they introduced the 1500 TS.

Based on Fiat’s 1500, the TS was styled by Giovanni Michelotti and was powered by a Siata-tuned 1.5-liter inline-four producing 94 horsepower. They are attractive, small, and all but forgotten. This is probably the last Siata you would picture if trying to recall all of their models.

Very few were built – and some were even built by Neckar Automobile in Germany. Even fewer survive today. This one should bring between $28,000-$34,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $25,774.

The First 275 GTB

1964 Ferrari 275 GTB Prototype

Offered by Gooding & Company | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 19, 2019

Photo – Gooding & Company

The Ferrari 250 series of cars went on sale in the early-1950s. Ferrari iterated on them for over a decade, but by 1964 they were pretty long-in-the-tooth. So when the 275 GTB was introduced, it was a revelation.

This was the first example they built, and it – like all of the other examples that followed – used technology brought about by Ferrari’s 275P Le Mans program. Power is from a 3.3-liter V-12 making 265 horsepower.

Ferrari kept the car through 1965, using it as a workhorse and revising it until they got it where they liked. Even the coachwork changed from its initial debut. It now wears a long-nose body style.

The car was entered by its first owner in the 1966 Monte Carlo Rally. Ferrari provided support, which is why this car is equipped with front rally lighting, three windshield wipers, and more. It’s had a string of known owners since and was acquired by the current collection in 1994.

It hasn’t been shown publicly in 25 years and is said to be in need of some serious service before use. Still, it should bring between $6,000,000-$8,000,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Gooding & Company.

Update: Not sold.