Four Cars From RM in Auburn

Four Cars From RM in Auburn

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Auburn, Indiana | August 30-September 2, 2018


1913 Maxwell Model 25 Touring

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Maxwell was founded in 1905 by Jonathan Dixon Maxwell and Benjamin Briscoe in Tarrytown, New York. It was the only surviving marque of Briscoe’s disastrous United States Motor Company conglomerate and would become known as Chrysler in 1925.

The Model 25 was actually sold in 1914 through 1924 but this car is apparently titled as a 1913. Power came from a 21 horsepower straight-four backed by a 3-speed manual transmission. This car is unrestored and would make a great driver. It should bring between $20,000-$30,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $13,200.


1914 White Model Thirty G.A.H. Touring

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The White Motor Company was around for 80 years, but only produced passenger cars for the first 18 of those. And the earliest examples were powered by steam before they focused on gasoline power (and ultimately diesel trucks).

White had a very strange model naming system going from about 1910 through 1916. Take for instance, this Model G.E.D. Touring. The 1914 model range consisted of the Model Thirty, the Model Forty, and Model Sixty. The Model Thirty was broken down as the G.A.F. Touring, Roadster, and Coupe. G.A.H. cars were actually built in 1916 so it’s hard telling why this is titled as a 1914. At any rate, it should bring between $45,000-$65,000 and you can read more here.

Update: Sold $29,700.


1919 Cole Aero Eight Sportster

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

The Cole Motor Car Company was founded by Joseph Cole in Indianapolis in 1909. Their claim to fame was that they were one of the first companies to offer a V8 engine in their cars. It debuted in 1915 for the 1916 model year and would last through the end of Cole production in 1925.

1919 Coles were dubbed the Series 870 and featured a 39 horsepower version of the company’s V8. In 1920, the “Aero Eight” moniker was introduced and the $2,750 4-passenger Sportster would’ve featured an upgraded 80 horsepower version of the engine. If this is a true Sportster, it’s going to have the big engine. It should bring between $20,000-$30,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $28,600.


1920 Buick Model K Roadster

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Buick only offered six-cylinder cars between 1919 and 1921. 1919’s Model H would become 1920’s Model K. For 1921 Buick moved to the Series 21 and would continue with numerical sequencing through 1924.

A 4.0-liter straight-six created 27 horsepower in the Model K and this 2-door, 3-passenger Roadster was the cheapest model offered at $1,495. About 19,000 of them were made in 1920 and this one should bring between $15,000-$25,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $14,300.

Maxwell Model LC

1908 Maxwell Model LC

Offered by Mecum | Dallas, Texas | September 3-6, 2014

Photo - Mecum

Photo – Mecum

Maxwell is an interesting (and important) early American automobile manufacturer. It was founded in 1904 by Jonathan Maxwell and Benjamin Briscoe (who had another car company named after himself). Maxwell was independent until 1910, when Briscoe formed the United States Motor Company, which brought 11 car companies under one umbrella (much like General Motors).

USMC failed in 1912 and Maxwell was the only company to come out if it alive. But by 1920, things were dire and a man named Walter P. Chrysler took control of Maxwell. Shortly thereafter, it essentially became the Chrysler we know today.

This Model LC was the entry-level Maxwell for 1908 and it was only called the “LC” for this model year. It uses a two-cylinder engine making 14 horsepower and was one of the first cars made primarily of steel. The car came in one body style, but it was reliable and a major success (Maxwell was #3 in sales for 1908, behind Ford and Buick).

This car sold in June, 2012 for $19,000. The market has gone up a little, but it shouldn’t break the bank for anyone looking to acquire a 100+ year old car to have a little fun with. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum in Dallas.

Update: Sold $13,500.

More Awesome Classic Commercial Vehicles

The Michael Banfield Collection

Offered by Bonhams | Staplehurst, U.K. | June 14, 2014


 1922 AEC S-Type Open Top Double Deck Bus

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

AEC is known as the double-decker bus company. Their Routemaster double-decker is one of the most famous of the type. But their double-deckers go back to before WWI. The S-Type was built between 1920 and 1927, with 849 (double-deckers) built for the London General Omnibus Company – for which this example was built.

The engine is a 35 horsepower 5.1-liter straight-four and it is said that this was as good as public transport got in London back in the day. It can transport up to 54 people – 26 inside and 28 up top in the weather.

This is thought to be one of only two S-Type double-deckers in existence. And it had a really cool story, which you can read more of here. The price? $130,000-$150,000.

Update: Sold $477,481.


1914 Hallford WD

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

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Maxwell Van

1917 Maxwell Commercial Delivery Car

Offered by Bonhams | Staplehurst, U.K. | June 14, 2014

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

Maxwell was founded by Jonathan Maxwell and Benjamin Briscoe. They mainly built cars during their existence between 1904 and 1925. They weren’t just some small company – at its height, Maxwell was selling over 10,000 cars a year. Which was a lot for the 1910s. Maxwell lives on today under its new name: “Chrysler.”

Although less well-known, Maxwell did build commercial vehicles their entire existence. The engine is a 3.0-liter straight-four. It’s a nice delivery vehicle that can be yours for between $34,000-$42,000. Click here for more info. And here for the rest of this awesome auction lineup.

Update: Sold $37,062.