Erskine Panel Delivery

1928 Erskine 51B Panel Truck

Offered by Mecum | Davenport, Iowa | November 7, 2019

Photo – Mecum

Erskine was introduced by Studebaker in 1927 as a low-priced brand and was named for company president Albert Erskine. It lasted through the 1930 model year when Studebaker dumped the idea and absorbed the line into its own.

What Erskine didn’t really do was commercial vehicles. Yet here we are. This is believed to be the only example of the Erskine Panel Truck produced, and it was built in 1928 as part of the Model 51 line, which was powered by a 43 horsepower 2.6-liter inline-six.

The truck was discovered in a warehouse in 1962 and later restored. It’s now being offered as part of Mecum’s “Antique Trucks” day at their massive tractor auction in Iowa. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $19,000.

American Austin Panel Truck

1935 American Austin Panel Truck

Offered by Bonhams | Greenwich, Connecticut | June 2, 2013

1935 American Austin Panel Truck

Photo – Bonhams

The Great Depression put a lot of American automobile manufacturers out of business – but they weren’t all glamorous marques like Auburn and Pierce-Arrow. American Austin went into the red big time in 1935 and the company had to be re-organized, this time as American Bantam (production would cease in 1941). This car was produced shortly before the company became American Bantam.

Much like the pickup featured above, this Panel Truck (with “truck” being used very loosely) is a very rare variant of the American Austin. It uses the same 747cc straight-four. The lot description lists it as “rated” at 15 horsepower. The life of this car is known since 1959 and it had a full restoration in the 1970s. It’s one of only a handful of panel van American Austins that survive. It should sell for between $20,000-$25,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $9,350.

A Pair of American Austins

1933 American Austin Pickup

Offered by Bonhams | Greenwich, Connecticut | June 2, 2013

1933 American Austin Pickup

Maybe I’m slow, but it wasn’t until I really looked at this little pickup that it dawned on me that American Austins really were just Austin Sevens (don’t judge me). Most of the convertibles that you see have two-tone “Sweep Panel” faux-Duesenberg paint job. It makes them look way fancier than the “British Model T” that the Austin Seven really is.

Anyway, this pickup is probably my favorite American Austin/Bantam that I’ve ever seen. Part of that is the weathered paint (okay, a lot of it is the weathered paint) – but there’s just something about the proportions of this truck that really appeals to me. The pickup variant was made in very small numbers and only a few survive today. It uses the same 747cc straight-four that all American Austins were blessed with. It made almost 14 horsepower. It is being sold “as is, no reserve” with an estimate between $15,000-$20,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $9,350.

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1935 American Austin Panel Truck

Offered by Bonhams | Greenwich, Connecticut | June 2, 2013

1935 American Austin Panel Truck

The Great Depression put a lot of American automobile manufacturers out of business – but they weren’t all glamorous marques like Auburn and Pierce-Arrow. American Austin went into the red big time in 1935 and the company had to be re-organized, this time as American Bantam (production would cease in 1941). This car was produced shortly before the company became American Bantam.

Much like the pickup featured above, this Panel Truck (with “truck” being used very loosely) is a very rare variant of the American Austin. It uses the same 747cc straight-four. The lot description lists it as “rated” at 15 horsepower. The life of this car is known since 1959 and it had a full restoration in the 1970s. It’s one of only a handful of panel van American Austins that survive. It should sell for between $20,000-$25,000. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $9,350.