Lone Star Touring

1920 Lone Star Beauty Four 5-Passenger Touring

Offered by RM Sotheby’s | Phoenix, Arizona | January 17-18, 2019

Photo Courtesy of RM Sotheby’s

Lone Star was a short-lived brand of automobile that was, in one very specific way, ahead of its time. Sold by the Lone Star Motor Truck and Tractor Association of San Antonio, Texas, the Lone Star was actually just a Piedmont (built in Virginia) with a different badge. You know, kind of like how the Chevy Tahoe and GMC Yukon are the exact same truck with different badges and marketing?

The Lone Star was sold from 1919 through 1922, and it’s thought that only 12 examples were produced (maybe shoppers in 1920 were able to see through the “buy Texas-made stuff” B.S. that people today so readily jump at?).

The Beauty Four is powered by a Lycoming inline-four making 35 horsepower. The 5-Passenger Tourer was the only body style offered. Restored, this is the only Lone Star thought to survive. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $44,800.

Knox Touring

1910 Knox Type O 5-Passenger Touring

Offered by Bonhams | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 18, 2018

Photo – Bonhams

Ever heard the saying “right place, right time?” Well Harry Knox lived it. He lived next door to automotive pioneer Frank Duryea who told him he should get into the auto business himself. So Knox set up the Knox Automobile Company in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1900.

When I think of Knox cars, this is what I picture. But what we have here is a large touring car. Knox started moving this direction around 1905, but their cars really started getting big in 1908. The Type O (which I show to be a 1909 model, though this one is listed as a 1910) was offered in two different wheelbases. This is the longer of the two.

It’s powered by a 45 horsepower, 6.1-liter straight-four. The Five-Passenger Touring body style was one of four offered in this chassis configuration and it cost $3,000 when new. The restoration of this example was completed in 2011. These later Knox cars don’t show up often, and the price of this one reflects that: it carries a pre-sale estimate between $175,000-$225,000. Click here for more info and here for the rest of Bonhams’ Scottsdale lineup.

Update: Sold $145,000.

Pathfinder Touring Car

1913 Pathfinder Series XIII A Five-Passenger Touring

Offered by RM Auctions | Phoenix, Arizona | January 19-20, 2012

This 40 horsepower Pathfinder is described as “the only one of its kind in existence,” meaning it is the only 1913 Pathfinder in existence – making it sound rarer than it is. It’s a Series XIII Five-Passenger Touring model with attractive, but average for the time, styling.

This model was originally spec’d with all available electrical equipment – but as you can see, there is a hand crank hanging out the front of the car. At this time, the electric starter had only been on Cadillacs for a year. While this car is quite interesting and worthy of being collected, it is not a Cadillac.

Pathfinder was in production for five short years, from 1912 until 1917, as a sub-marque of the Parry Automobile Company of Indianapolis, Indiana. Later cars became more luxurious with V-12 engines, but this early model has a 281 cubic inch L-head 4-cylinder.

This particular car sold this past summer at an RM Auction for $115,500. You have to wonder when a car pops up at auction twice in a year. Either the new buyer wanted to hurry and try and flip it for a quick profit and that plan went south and they needed to just get rid of it. Or there is something wrong with it. I’m guessing the former. With only six months since it’s last sale, I doubt the market for 1913 Pathfinder’s has changed all that much. More about it here, with auction info here.

Update: Not Sold.

Update II: Sold, RM Sotheby’s Arizona 2016, $121,000.