Five Old Convertibles from Bonhams

Five Old Cars from Bonhams

Offered by Bonhams | Paris, France | February 7, 2019


1908 Clement-Bayard AC4I Tourer

Photo – Bonhams

Bonhams has a great number of interesting, early cars in their Retromobile catalog this year. We’ll be featuring five of the most interesting pre-WWI tourers (okay four, and one landaulette). Clement-Bayard was founded by Adolphe Clement, whose career is worthy of its own post.

I usually picture smaller cars, or very early cars, when thinking of Clement-Bayard, but this car proves that they also built quite large, expensive tourers as well. This car is powered by a 2.4-liter straight-four. It is said to be original and unrestored, which is pretty impressive. It should sell for between $86,000-$110,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold.


1911 Renault Type CC Torpedo

Photo – Bonhams

The Type CC was a mid-sized Renault built in 1911 and 1912. It is sometimes referred to as the 14CV and is powered by a 3.6-liter straight-four making 16 horsepower. I’ve seen one of these in person (or a model very similar) and they’re a little smaller than you might think. But they make great old car noises.

This one carries a body from Million-Guiet that has some nice details. Check out the shape of the lower part of the windshield, for instance. Good luck finding replacement glass. Partially-restored, this car should bring between $69,000-$100,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold.


1912 Hupmobile Model 32 Tourer

Photo – Bonhams

In a sea of old French cars offered by Bonhams in Paris, here’s an American one. The Hupp Motor Car Company of Detroit built cars from 1909 through 1940. They didn’t make it to the other side of WWII, but their cars were well-known and respected for many years prior.

The Model 32 went on sale in 1912 and is powered by a 32 horsepower straight-four engine. Production continued through 1915. This one was exported to Ireland in 1990 and was restored there in 2009. It’s a perfect example of an early American touring car and should sell for between $17,000-$23,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $18,267.


1913 FN Type 2700 Tourer

Photo – Bonhams

Gotta love the lighting assistant standing to the side in the photo above (though I’d gladly take that job). FN was a Belgian company, and quite a few of them have been sold from this very collection. Here’s a smaller Model 2000 version, for example.

While that car may physically look larger, it has a smaller engine. The car you see here is powered by a 2.7-liter straight-four. The 2700 was introduced shortly before WWI broke out, and it is thought that only 16 examples were produced before the company’s focus shifted to the war. This one doesn’t wear its original body (it was used as a fire engine at one point) but should still bring between $29,000-$40,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $22,181.


1912 Berliet Type AM 15HP Brougham de Ville

Photo – Bonhams

And finally, we have a Berliet – another French car. Not a full convertible, this car is described as a Brougham de Ville, which means the owner got to ride in the covered section out back while the chauffeur sat up front, exposed to the elements.

This car is powered by a 15 horsepower straight-four engine and was acquired by the collection from which it is being sold in 1963. The body was fitted during this time but is pretty accurate to what a car would’ve looked like in 1912. This one should command between $52,000-$63,000. More can be found here, and more from this sale can be found here.

Update: Sold $43,058.

Berliet Torpedo

1926 Berliet Type VI Torpedo

Offered by Osenat | Lyon, France | November 8, 2015

Photo - Osenat

Photo – Osenat

Marius Berliet began selling cars in 1900 and his company’s range quickly expanded. In the 1920s, they were building cheap versions of the Dodge in France and it ran the company into the ground. Somehow, they emerged from bankruptcy in 1929 (of all years) and survived the 1930s, ceasing passenger car production in 1939. After the war, they continued to build commercial vehicles up through 1978, when new owner Renault phased out the marque.

The Type VI was offered in a couple of body styles, including this slab-sided torpedo. The engine is a 1.2-liter straight-four making seven to 10 horsepower. The model was new for 1924.

This car was acquired by its present owner in 1977 and stored. He restored it in the early 2000s. It’s got four new tires and is ready to run and should sell for between $12,000-$14,500. Click here for more info and here for more from this sale.

Update: Sold $11,300.

Artcurial Monaco Sale Highlights (7/27/12)

His Serene Highness The Sovereign Prince of Monaco, Albert II, must have come to the conclusion at some point that, perhaps, he doesn’t really need all of the cars stored away in his family’s collection. Many were purchased by his father, Prince Rainer. In any case, Artcurial was called in to thin the herd a little bit. Thirty-eight cars in all were available at the auction and all of them sold. The top sale went to this 1987 Mercedes-Benz 500 SEC AMG for $149,787.

Interesting sales was the name of the game and they don’t get any more interesting than this 1987 Fleur de Lys Newark Minibus. It looks old, but it is built around modern mechanicals. I’ve never seen one. It sold for $50,991.

This 1942 Dodge 4×4 Command Car brought the highest price of the four World War II-era American military vehicles offered at this sale at $71,706.

This 1913 Panhard & Levassor X19 Roadster is a very interesting pre-WWI car with a 10 horsepower four-cylinder engine. It sold for $103,576.

If 10 horsepower is too much for you to handle, you could’ve bought this five horsepower 1925 Citroen Cabriolet for $26,292.

Another very early car was this 1907 Berliet C2 Double-Phaeton. This is a museum-quality piece with a very aerodynamic windscreen. It sold for $90,031.

And finally, this 1969 Siata Spring. It’s based on a Fiat, but looks like an MG… kind of. You here more about these things than do you see them. It would’ve been an interesting acquisition for $31,870.

For complete results (sans photos), click here. To view the full lot list in PDF form with pictures, click here.