1911 De Dion-Bouton

1911 De Dion-Bouton DE1 Two-Seat Tourer

Offered by Brightwells | Bicester, U.K. | April 11, 2017

Photo – Brightwells

De Dion-Bouton was the first automotive giant. By 1900 they were producing 400 cars a year and over 3,000 engines that were used by car makers all over the world. Single-cylinder De Dion engines were ubiquitous in the early days of the automobile.

In 1911, the DE1 was the entry-level De Dion-Bouton offering and it’s powered by one of those legendary single-cylinder engines. In this case, a 720cc unit capable of six horsepower. It was among the final cars to carry their famous single-cylinder as the company moved toward larger cars. Ultimately the company ceased car production in 1932.

The history of this model is known back only a few decades. Within the last ten years the car has been repainted and the engine rebuilt. It’s well-optioned for a car of its age, carrying many period accessories. Brightwells took this car to auction a few months ago and we regrettably failed to feature it. Lucky for us it didn’t meet its reserve and it’s back for us to oogle. It should bring $35,000-$40,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Not sold.

1911 EMF Race Car

1911 EMF Model 30 Two-Seat Racer

Offered by Bonhams | Amelia Island, Florida | March 12, 2015

Photo - Bonhams

Photo – Bonhams

This is a race car that was built the same year the first Indianapolis 500 was held. It didn’t race there, but it looks just like the cars that did. These were stripped down versions of road cars with two seats and light body work.

EMF was the abbreviation of Everitt-Metzger-Flanders – three men who had been around the booming auto industry for years. They built cars together for a few years between 1908 and 1912. Studebaker acquired them and shut them down because their quality wasn’t exactly great.

This car was entered in the 1911 Tiedeman Trophy Race in Savannah, Georgia. It was a big event – bigger than that new event held way back in Indiana. EMF entered three cars in the race and they finished 1-2-3. This car was driven by Jack Tower, who would race at Indy twice (in 1911 and 1913).

It is powered by a straight-four that makes 30 horsepower. It was discovered by the current owned in the 1970s and was restored then and restored again in the 2000s. It is the only surviving EMF racing car and it is thought to be the only surviving car that competed in the Tiedeman Trophy Race.

Pre-WWI race cars are extremely rare but they are incredible machines. This car has never been offered for public sale before. Now’s your chance if you have between $150,000-$200,000. to spend. Click here for more info and here for the rest of Bonhams’ lineup.

Update: Sold $242,000.