’68 Hemi Charger

1968 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi

Offered by Russo & Steele | Scottsdale, Arizona | January 27-31, 2016

Photo - Russo & Steele

Photo – Russo & Steele

There’s three generations of classic Hemi Dodge Chargers that are really collectible. First is the 1966-1967 model. Then came this one. And finally, the 1971-1974 model. This is the most famous body style of the original Dodge Chargers. It is the one that Bo and Luke Duke tore around in.

This is a Hemi, meaning it is powered by a 7.0-liter V-8 rated at 425 horsepower. This is also an R/T car, meaning is has the “road and track package” which adds dual exhaust and heavy duty brakes, among other things (including the standard 440 engine or the optional Hemi).

This car has a rare 4-speed transmission and is the only such example with this color paint, which is actually quite nice. It’s been exceptionally restored. Only 467 1968 Chargers were equipped with the 426 Hemi and this is one of the nicest. Click here for more info and here for more from Russo & Steele.

Update: Sold $242,000.

Shelby Charger

1983 Dodge Shelby Charger Hatchback

Offered by Auctions America | Ft. Lauderdale, Florida | March 27, 2015

Photo - Auctions America

Photo – Auctions America

This was the first car that Shelby got his hands on at Chrysler. They went on sale in 1983 and lasted through the 1987 model year. The engine is a 2.2-liter turbocharged straight-four making 175 horsepower (the Shelby standard while at Chrysler). This model was much more common than some of the other Chrysler Shelbys, with 8,251 built in 1983 alone. Still, it should bring between $12,000-$16,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $11,000.

Chrysler Shelbys

Chrysler Shelbys

Offered by Auctions America | Ft. Lauderdale, Florida | March 27, 2015


 1989 Shelby CSX Hatchback

Photo - Auctions America

Photo – Auctions America

The Shelby CSX was built between 1987 and 1989 and was based on the Dodge Shadow. Available as a two or four-door hatchback, they were all powered by a 2.2-liter turbocharged straight-four making 175 horsepower. It offered serious performance for only $13,495. This car is essentially brand new – it still has the plastic on the seats. Only 500 were built and this has to be the nicest one around. It is expected to bring between $20,000-$30,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $17,600.


1986 Shelby Omni GLHS Hatchback

Photo - Auctions America

Photo – Auctions America

This might be the most-famous car that Carroll Shelby’s name was put on during his collaboration with Chrysler in the 1980s. The Dodge Omni was a subcompact car that has essentially disappeared from America’s roads. There was the Dodge Omni GLH (“Goes Like Hell”) which was a Shelby special sold by Dodge. But then there was this, the GLHS (“Goes Like Hell S’more”). This car uses a turbocharged 2.2-liter straight-four making 175 horsepower. That’s a lot as the base Corvette from 1986 only made 230. Only 500 of these were built and this one could bring between $20,000-$30,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $15,400.


1983 Dodge Shelby Charger Hatchback

Photo - Auctions America

Photo – Auctions America

This was the first car that Shelby got his hands on at Chrysler. They went on sale in 1983 and lasted through the 1987 model year. The engine is a 2.2-liter turbocharged straight-four making 175 horsepower (the Shelby standard while at Chrysler). This model was much more common than some of the other Chrysler Shelbys, with 8,251 built in 1983 alone. Still, it should bring between $12,000-$16,000. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $11,000.


1987 Shelby Lancer Hatchback

Photo - Auctions America

Photo – Auctions America

This was the third product of the Chrysler/Shelby collaboration. The 1987 Shelby Lancer was actually built by Shelby. The 1988 and 1989 cars were built by Dodge. Shelby only built 800 in 1987 – half came with an automatic and the other half had a 5-speed manual (this car included). All were powered by the ubiquitous 2.2-liter turbocharged straight-four making 175 horsepower. The Dodge-built cars are actually rarer than the Shelby-assembled ones, but this is more collectible. It could bring between $20,000-$30,000 as it is essentially brand new. Click here for more info.

Update: Sold $16,500.


1989 Shelby Dakota

Photo - Auctions America

Photo – Auctions America

This was the only rear-wheel-drive Chrysler product that Shelby put his name on. They were built in 1989 only and this one is fresh – only 23 miles on the odometer. Luckily, it had something other than the 2.2-liter turbo unit used on the other cars. This truck has a 5.2-liter V-8 making… the same 175 horsepower that the little turbo four makes. In all, 1,475 were built, 995 of those were this red you see here (the rest were white). They cost $15,813 when new and this one should bring between $20,000-$30,000. Click here for more info and here for the rest of Auctions America’s Ft. Lauderdale lineup.

Update: Sold $24,200.

’71 Hemi Charger

1971 Dodge Charger R/T Hemi

Offered by Mecum | Kissimmee, Florida | January 23, 2015

Photo - Mecum

Photo – Mecum

This Charger is from the first year of production of the third generation body style, which would be built through 1974. It was the last “real” two-door Charger that wasn’t badge-engineered and that was a capable of anything resembling performance.

What makes this car even better is that it has a Hemi. 1971 was the final year for the 426 Hemi – the 425 horsepower 7.0-liter monster V-8. This is the highest-optioned Charger known to exist from this year – it is one of very few cars with a powered sunroof and is one of only 63 built in ’71 with a Hemi.

The original base price of a 1971 Charger was almost doubled when the finally option tally was finished. The High Impact Hemi Orange is set off by the R/T package of graphics. The car is correct and has 35,638 original miles on it. It has everything and Mecum actually has an estimate on it: $450,000-$550,000. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum.

Update: Not sold, high bid of $375,000.

Hemi Charger Daytona

1969 Dodge Charger Daytona Hemi

Offered by Mecum | Kissimmee, Florida | January 16-25, 2015

Photo - Mecum

Photo – Mecum

Chrysler was serious about NASCAR at the end of the 1960s. They were designing purpose-built specials to compete in NASCAR and win on the big ovals of Daytona and Talladega. The Plymouth Superbird would come in 1970, but for ’69 there was the Charger Daytona, which was a modified Dodge Charger (specifically, the Charger 500 model).

The changes were mostly aerodynamic: a pointed nose cone that was attached at the front to cut through the air and a 23-inch mega-spoiler out back. There were smaller trim bits as well and the standard engine was the 440 V-8. But this example has the Hemi option – a 425 horsepower 7.0-liter V-8.

Only 503 Charger Daytonas were built and only 70 have a Hemi. This is the lowest-mileage Hemi Daytona known to exist, having only 6,435 original miles and was once part of the Otis Chandler Collection. It is an easy six-figure car. Click here for more info and here for more from Mecum in Kissimmee next January.

Update: Sold $900,000.

Hemi Charger Fastback

1966 Dodge Hemi Charger

Offered by Mecum | Anaheim, California | November 23, 2013

1966 Dodge Hemi Charger

Of the six generations of Dodge Chargers, I think this one might be my favorite. It was the first gen model and it was only sold for 1966 and 1967. It was essentially a fastback version of the B-body Coronet.

The base engine was a 5.2-liter V-8. But you could definitely up your car’s power if you wanted. And the owner of this car did. This particular Charger carries a 426 cubic inch (7.0-liter) Hemi V-8 under the hood. Horsepower was listed at 425 – which is a lot for a car that I would essentially qualify as a sleeper (it looks pretty mundane. I mean, check out those wheels and luxury-barge-esque grille).

What makes this car even better is that it is almost entirely original – even the paint is as it was from the factory. The engine was rebuilt in the late-90s after sitting for over 10 years. It has some rare equipment too: it is one of 257 launch-year Hemi Chargers with a four-speed manual transmission. This is about a $100,000 car. Click here for more info and here for the rest of Mecum’s Anaheim lineup.

Update: Failed to sell (high bid of $40,000).

Mecum Spring Classic 2012 Highlights

Dana Mecum’s 25th Original Spring Classic Auction held May 15-20, 2012, sold a ton of cars. I mean, it has seriously taken me two days to go through the results and my mind has melted from staring at the computer screen. The top sale was this gorgeous 1968 Chevrolet Corvette L88 Convertible, one of 18, that sold for $600,000.

Muscle cars were the stars of the show. Numerous Hemi Mopars and big-block Chevys went across the block and brought big numbers. One of my favorite Hemi cars to sell was a 1966 Dodge Charger – my favorite Charger bodystyle. It sold for $190,000 – and it’s all original and unrestored.

Another wonderfully rare muscle car brought the second-highest price paid for a car at this sale. It’s a 1969 Yenko Nova and it’s one awesome looking car. It sold for an eye-popping $475,000.

Our featured car, the Baldwin Motion Manta Ray GT failed to sell. Interesting sales of note included this 1978 Jeep J10 Honcho 4×4 that looks great and would’ve only cost you $7,000.

Carroll Shelby’s recent passing put a spotlight on all Shelby-badged vehicles. One of the more obscure models with the Shelby name on it is this 1989 Dodge Shelby Dakota. It’s one of 1,500 built and sold for $9,500.

And finally, there was the 1964 Voisin Biscuter microcar – and it’s about as cheap as you can go on the Voisin scale. It sold for $13,000 – less than half of what it was priced at a month ago at Hyman Ltd.

There are countless – literally – other cars that sold at this sale. Check out the complete results at Mecum’s website.

Russo & Steele Scottsdale Highlights

This is our final Scottsdale auction recap. It’s been weeks since it happened but we finally caught up. Russo & Steele sold a wide variety of cars from the affordable (the lowest seller was a 1978 Triumph Spitfire 1500 Convertible that sold for $4,675) to the super expensive – the top sale was this 1968 Chevrolet Corvette L88 Roadster that sold for $687,500. It was one of only 216 built during three years of production.

The second top seller was a 1965 Shelby GT350 that was once used as a race car at the Carroll Shelby School of High Performance Driving. It has a fresh restoration and looks amazing. I could easily imagine myself tearing around a racetrack in this car. But for $467,500, it’s a little out of my range.

Our two featured cars from this auction, a 1973 Mercury Cougar XR7 Convertible and a Ketchup & Mustard-liveried ’96 RT/10 Viper both sold. The Cougar brought $17,600 and the Viper $39,050.

Other highlights included a pair of rare Mopar’s: this 1969 Dodge Charger Daytona:

sold for $118,800. And a blue 1970 Plymouth Hemi Cuda sold for $115,500. And finally, probably the rarest car in this sale was this 1984 Knudsen Baroque Cabriolet – 1 of 2 such cars built. Knudsen built 11 total Baroques in Nebraska in the late 70s and early 80s in a variety of bodystyles. When new, these cars cost between $80,000 and $225,000. According to the consignor, this car cost $86,000 in 1984. It sold for only $12,100.

For complete results, click here.